Little advice on running?

MasoN

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Some advice


Now that i know i'm injury free and have some real running trainers im going for it, a proper running routine. I tryed a run on a new path yesterday ( a dual carriage way *text deleted* ) and could only make about .7 of a mile altogether, i wasn't out of breath but my legs were just not going to move much longer, it's been about a month since i ran last and was only doing a mile then. My question is, i'm going to run the same distance for a week, then up it a tiny bit each week, slow but sure progress! Today i can really feel the backs of my legs aching and my plan was to do this run 5 times a week, now i don't know if i should start going 5 times a week as i don't want to overtrain(injure myself) any suggestions? thanks guys
 

Shiloh79

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Hiya mate :D

I'm not upto speed with where you're at physically but your thinking along the right lines .... steady progression while your trying to improve your running is a good idea! Though one query mate and i dont meean it as if i'm having a go but surely you should be able to run .7 of mile with no issues :? :?: even if your not a big runner!

As for strengthening your legs mate - if running tires you out big time, get yourself on a treadmill intially and put a fairly stead incline on it and power walk - sounds daft but your feets are actually in contact with the ground more therefore meaning your working your legs harder! Obviously you'll need to progress this to a jog then a run but start of small! Then once your legs are stronger hit the roads again!

Hope that helps!
 

MasoN

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i know it's bad, i put on a bit of weight when i stopped running now im at 16.3 stone, do you think i should get a base level off a tredmill then?
 

Globe-Trotter

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MasoN said:
i know it's bad, i put on a bit of weight when i stopped running now im at 16.3 stone, do you think i should get a base level off a tredmill then?
I would advise lots of outdoor walking/jogging on a soft surface to start off with.You have mentioned you have put some weight on and the worst thing you can do is pound along a hard surface as this will cause problems
 

liam

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liam

my college is about 1 1/2 up the road would it be ok for me to jog that everyday in preperation for the 3mile run?.

from tommorow i am going to jog up there in the mornin and i am going to jog back home when i finish.
 

jamie.english

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Yeh 1 1/2 miles is a good start. just don't try and run too fast at first. Concentrate on distance first.

Work on one thing at once.

If you're really concerned, try walking (at a good pace) for 3 miles each day. Then gradually get faster and faster.
 

Globe-Trotter

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I wouldnt say jogging the didstance to college is not a bad thing but obviously you will have to do more training than that for the PRMC.
 

liam

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hey

thanks for the reply guys

but it is only a starting point while im getting a running program together.

but is it a good start for now?

i hope it is *text deleted*
 

evo360

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I know most of this subject has been covered but the tightening up you can feel in your calves can become a big problem. You really need to strech before and after a run. I encountered massive problems before I joined the Navy because of this. Stretch out your calves and hamstrings , concentrate on each muscle for about ten seconds before a run and about twenty seconds or more after a run. Plus stretch whenever you have the chance during the day. Dont try and rush the whole running thing because you will damage yourself and end up going backwards. Good luck and stay focused
 

Tomm2024

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Just to back up what evo said, there are two main goals of stretching after exercise. One is to offset the effect of the exercise, which tightens muscles. The second is called developmental stretching which is when you want to increase the range of motion of a muscle; with the calf muscle, most people don't do developmental stretching when a lot of runners should be doing so.

Developmental stretches take longer than the other kind of stretching; if you're passive stretching then it normally takes around 30 seconds before that tightness eases off.

Essentially what happens is your central nervous system panics when a muscle is stretched because it thinks it will become damaged; this tightens the muscle in reaction. When you stretch, you stay in a position and your CNS realises that damage is unlikely (as mentioned, normally taking around 30secs), so relaxes the muscle. You can then stretch slightly further until you feel that tightening (which is the CNS engaging again) and wait for it to ease off again.

There are lots of different ways to stretch, but the calf muscle really tends to either be trained through passive stretching or something called PNF.

Great resource for stretching: http://people.bath.ac.uk/masrjb/Stretch/stretching_5.html#SEC38

Cheers,
Tom
 
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