Maintaining speed

nebby1303

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I recently ran 1.5 miles in 10 mins dead. I just need to work on 3 miles in 22.5 mins. Does anyone know of any workouts I can to do to maintain and build speed?
Cheers, appreciate it
 

Caversham

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Introduce Fartlek into your run. Once warmed up and running comfortable, try sprinting between lamp posts, then jog to recovery. Then repeat. Do this several times during the run and you will find after several sessions of this that your times will come down.

Alan
 

Illustrious

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Tabata / fartlek as suggested. Throw in a treadmill session of it as it'll force you to maintain a set, uncomfortably, fast speed. Crack the incline to 3% to over simulate road conditions.
 

Rogerst

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I have been doing interval runs to try and better my times as mentioned above.
For example week one I would do 4x600m intervals with a 400m jog inbetween to recover.
I'm now doing 1km intervals still with a 400m recovery jog and I find this very effective! Obviously it' all down to the individual, Arnie's plan has some good recommendations on how to better your bft times
 

Old Man

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Tabata / fartlek as suggested. Throw in a treadmill session of it as it'll force you to maintain a set, uncomfortably, fast speed. Crack the incline to 3% to over simulate road conditions.
That's the first such suggestion I've seen in all the years I've been on the site. I've always thought being able to do over a test standard was a sure sign that you were capable of passing a test.

When I did martial arts and a grading approached, I'd practise doing the necessary at least twice, ensuring that, on the night, I could pass it with maximum effort, knowing that I had enough in the tank to do so.

If I'd been training for a PJFT, I'd always have the gradient set to 3. For a PRMC, I'd extend the time of the max effort required, the day after doing over and above the previous day's tests.

Never mentioned it before as I've no qualification to give fitness advice.

I'd also create a mindset of revelling in physicality rather than stress over some aspect such as running on a treadmill.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Tabata / fartlek as suggested. Throw in a treadmill session of it as it'll force you to maintain a set, uncomfortably, fast speed. Crack the incline to 3% to over simulate road conditions.
Fully agree, also based on best advice from CTC, that hill sprints and interval training (or whatever we're calling it this week) is the way to bring down your run times.

As ever, the PJFT is proof positive that people will always train to meet the minimum standards if we we tell them pass/fail parameters. The target, as we forever preach is to train hard, rest easy. Go beyond the minimum requirements or you will psyche yourself out and struggle to pass. Everyone has a bad training day, but that isn't an accepted excuse for failing the PJFT.

In other words you train beyond the requirement. The PJFT should be seen as a progressive stage to PRMC and yet we forever see people flapping about having to repeat the PJFT and this is because there's a natural aversion to runnning at an uncomfortable pace without the airflow or undulations of running outdoors, so people target minimums to get it out of the way because, for some, the PJFT becomes a mental block, the "dreadmill", if you will.
 

Ballista

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Fully agree, also based on best advice from CTC, that hill sprints and interval training (or whatever we're calling it this week) is the way to bring down your run times.

As ever, the PJFT is proof positive that people will always train to meet the minimum standards if we we tell them pass/fail parameters. The target, as we forever preach is to train hard, rest easy. Go beyond the minimum requirements or you will psyche yourself out and struggle to pass. Everyone has a bad training day, but that isn't an accepted excuse for failing the PJFT.

In other words you train beyond the requirement. The PJFT should be seen as a progressive stage to PRMC and yet we forever see people flapping about having to repeat the PJFT and this is because there's a natural aversion to runnning at an uncomfortable pace without the airflow or undulations of running outdoors, so people target minimums to get it out of the way because, for some, the PJFT becomes a mental block, the "dreadmill", if you will.

If you've got a minute Ninja may I ask why the scores for the gym tests were revealed in the last year or so? The philosophy has always been aim for maximum which is why they didn't spell it out before, but now we know that getting 52 press ups and 60 press ups for example gets you the same number of points. So naturally some candidates are going to just aim for the minimum in the goal of conserving energy.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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If you've got a minute Ninja may I ask why the scores for the gym tests were revealed in the last year or so? The philosophy has always been aim for maximum which is why they didn't spell it out before, but now we know that getting 52 press ups and 60 press ups for example gets you the same number of points. So naturally some candidates are going to just aim for the minimum in the goal of conserving energy.
It's personality driven with regard the release of the current scoring system. That said, after ten years, in which we've witnessed so many changes to PRMC and the points systems, the publication of the detail lasts as long as the ink takes to dry on the laser printer.

There'll always be people who aim for the top and those who will content themselves with mediocrity. Much the same as there are people who cycle or run to/from the gym & those who don't go unless they have a lift. For Royal Marines, we're seeking those who don't always settle for the easy option.

Truth is, a pass is a pass, regardless of grade and arguably the pass/fail line varies depending on supply & demand.

The criteria elements beyond selection, during training itself, will seldom change and to increase the chances of success in training, the fitter you are, the higher the rate of success...but only to a point, some of it is luck or lack of it, when it comes to injuries.
 
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