MALBORO MARINE.....a Bit sad but worth watching!

Gaz the "Taff"

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NOW...i dont want to be putting off anybody from the Royal Marines (I would never do that!!!) but i came across this video. Its the story of a Us Marine suffering from PTSD. It doesnt happen to everyone but that doesnt mean it dont happen. The guy who posted it is a Marine Veteran who praises the Royal Marines quite a bit :) not the usual Yanker on Youtube who slags us off like its a *text deleted* sport!

http://uk.youtube.com/watch?v=U1hnlBuJZVY

SORRY! I KNOW ITS A LITTLE SAD, BUT BEING THAT THERES A MILITARY CLIPS SECTION, I THAUGHT THIS WAS RIGHTLY DESERVED TO BE HERE.

Take care guys
 

Ty

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Good program mate. It's a sad reality for many people. Being physically fit does not mean you have the mental capacity for surviving a war zone. I've been told by my oldest brother who has been to Iraq, of great soldiers in training that suddenly freeze up and cry when being fired upon.

This is the nature of the job. You must take life. In the end, your doing your job, protecting your nation. What sickens me is when civvies ask soldiers if they have ever killed anyone. The only answer I would give is " I did my job, what I've been trained to do." PTSD hurts a lot of troops, and the sad realization is that you'll never know if it truly will affect you, until your actually there, and have experienced it. Make no mistake, it WILL change you as a person, as will the Royal Marine training.
 

Gaz the "Taff"

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Yeah, i think Jeremy Clarksons charity helps for Guys who come back with PTSD and loss of any limbs ect... "Help For Heores" i think its called.
So whats your Brother in mate?
 

Ty

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My brother is in the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, for the Canadian Forces. He's a infantry sargeant section commander in Afghanistan at the moment. He's on his 3rd tour, so he's seen a lot of action. Remarkably when he comes home, he's the same bro I grew up with. Laughing, playing Playstation and X box and having a few drinks playing cards. It's amazing how war changes certain people that simply can't adjust.

Heres a pic of my bro


 

blocky

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Ty said:
He's a infantry sargeant section commander in Afghanistan at the moment. He's on his 3rd tour, so he's seen a lot of action.
theres your answer taff :)
 

Plummy

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i know i might just be being naive but when you think about it when us potential marines are in training we are bonded together like no other unit can possibly do? if my friends/comrades were getting shot on or if a guy taliban has a gun mayb id hesitate the first time but the second time no way. might be my bringing up? "always look after your own first" and i would stick by that. if i didnt shoot him id worry about him going round the corner nd shooting another marine or maybe a close friend. at the end of the day lads we are protecting our country and the innocent people who want a free life and everyone deserves that? if we dont shoot them there *text deleted* shoot us. rant over *text deleted* but its sad to see people i such a situation and i have reasearched alot of it and it mainly seems to be people without support from family and friends.
 

Gaz the "Taff"

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its not naieve mate :) when we go out to Ghaners and i see one of us go down or see that someone is in trouble, i'll be there to help and get you the *text deleted* out of dodge and know very well that you'd do the same for me or anyone else. Its instilled in you deeply to look after each other. No one outside the Military and marine environment can understand the way in which WE will live in the forces,Prepared to die and look out for each other ect... comes with the job *text deleted*
even when we retire i intend to stay in touch with whomever i know in the Royal Marines. We will be Family :D
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Combat, most definitely, affects us all in different ways without a shadow of a doubt.

Many have suffered from PTSD at various times & to different levels. It's only recently that I've started to realise that I suffer(ed) from it myself after the Falklands conflict. In those days it was called Combat Stress, 90 years ago it was called Shell-Shock.

The only thing I'd advise, is that you should NEVER believe it will never affect you. If in doubt, there's help there- NEVER be afraid to ask for help, it's there, just don't be too proud to ask for it.
 

Gaz the "Taff"

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My dad was in Bosnia with the RAF when the *text deleted* hit the big *text deleted* fan with their Ethnic cleansing. He would say thongs, not much, but little things like when he drove down certain roads to certain locations, on the side of the road would be dozens of crosses where piles of people just *text deleted*ing slaughtered were found. And he would say the smell of a dead body is something you can never duplicate out anywhere else (not that you want to of course) but once you smell it you'll never forget it.

so..with him saying things like that, shows some sort of effect, obviously, on him. He's been to Iraq where he was Mortared continuously. He would say, "you'll see one or two guys die every two months, but theres hundreds who are disabled and limbless from attacks everyday that you never hear about". He went to Bagram airbase in Afghanistan when the *text deleted* kicked off with 9/11. He was working with Chinook CH-47s and was transporting a large group of Royal Marines (told me this when i said im applying the RM :*text deleted*: ) up in the Mountains arround Bagram to flush out Talban that were regularly attacking the Base. It was a 20 minute flight. from the first minute leaving the base to the DZ and back they were shot to *text deleted*!
:*text deleted*: Every Royal Marine and "Chinny" crew member had a wide eyed worried look and their assholes as tight as a cows ass in fly season :*text deleted*:
he said "Ok, if these big bastards are *text deleted* themselves...Im *text deleted* myself" :*text deleted*:

I think its a really important thing to notify guys and ladies in the Forces about PTSD. THANKS FOR THE ADVICE MATE, ABOUT NOT BEING AFFRAID TO SPEAK UP IF THERES SOMETHING BUGGING THEM. I read a book about how WW1 guys who went down with Shellshock were classed as Deserters ect and *text deleted*ing shot at dawn! silly bastards :evil: :*text deleted*:
Dont worry folks....not as bad as that today :*text deleted*:
 

Gaz the "Taff"

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....I farted my message up....."My dad was in Bosnia with the RAF when the *text deleted* hit the big *text deleted* fan with their Ethnic cleansing. He would say T H O N G S, not m......"

Sorry about that :P :wink:
 
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