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marathons

Discussion in 'Training Methods and Diet Suggestions' started by Vine, Apr 22, 2016.

  1. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Anybody know the ins and and outs of doing a marathon I really fancy having a crack at one always been something I wanted to do.

    Anyways where would the best place to book one and what's a good price how much would I have to adjust my training, what's a decent time/pace to run. Any decent tips in general.

    Also if any Scottish lads fancy having a go (or anyone willing to come up for one) your welcome to join in.
     
  2. Harsh

    Harsh Member

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    Bournemouth is a good one bath as well I have heard is pretty decent. May sound stupid but one of the guaranteed big city marathons is Paris it's like a £90 entry fee. London is ballot so tough to get into, However you could run for a charity. If you don't reach a fund target though you are liable to cover the rest.
     
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  3. 3344

    3344 Member

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    I ran the London one several years ago and it was one of the coolest experiences I've had. Almost the entire route is packed with spectators cheering you on, bands playing by the side of the road and it all gives an amazing atmosphere to the event which I think is unique to the London marathon. Some runners write their name on their t-shirt and then people cheer on that person the whole way, probably the closest feeling most of us will get to being a professional athlete.
    If you can get a place then I'd highly recommend it. On the down side, after the event the entire bottom of both my feet turned into one big blister and popped off a few toenails and I couldn't walk up and down stairs for a few days.
     
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  4. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    I have run several marathons over the years, London (several), New York, (a blast) and Dartmoor, (brutal). The training programme takes about 16 weeks from scratch and builds up from a starting point of 30 miles a week to around 55 at the peak.

    Not sure if it's relevant, but when I applied to run London, they always asked if you would be willing to donate your entry fee if you were unsuccessful. I was advised to decline and have to say it worked each time.

    Never set the running world alight, but managed 3.31 best and 3.50 worst, (New York; too many doughnuts before the start!)

    As for running schedules, I always found that the best programme I had was to take myself off onto Dartmoor for 7 to 8 hours and walk the ups and run the downs and flats. Built up so much stamina it resulted in my best time.

    Alan
     
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  5. 3344

    3344 Member

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    I'm sure it is a coincidence but the first time I applied I chose to donate my entry fee if I was unsuccessful and I didn't get a place that year, the next year I chose not to and got offered a place!
     
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  6. MadMan48

    MadMan48 Member

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    I've done the Glencoe marathon several times - absolutely superb event. Highly recommend it, especially if you're in Scotland. Expect a lot of hills, hill weather, and 100% off road. It's in October I think so plenty of time to train!
     
  7. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Something I've always thought I need to give that a go. London seems too far purely for convenience I'd need to get a hotel/flight or train down etc. Looked at Fort William and dundee marathons both mid to late July and I could drive up/down that day mind you would probably want a pint after. distance wise I reckon I could finish a half marathon just now so hopefully I should be able to get that extra distance by then is there a reputable site in particular I should use? @Caversham was hoping you'd come along being the resident marathon man thanks for the input, if I get in under 4 hours I'd be very happy.
     
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  8. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Glencoe in October sounds cold will be worth looking into depending on how the July one goes could be ideal training for PRMC hopefully will be on one by around that time.
     
  9. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    Sub 4 hours is respectable. Just get the miles in each week and you will achieve it.

    Alan
     
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  10. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Will keep you posted lads cheers for the help got myself a target now!
     
  11. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Cracked my first half marathon tonight in just over 1.50 Looking for some follow up advice. I felt comfortable at that pace but my legs struggled the last few km would I be better doing say 10 miles for a few weeks and adding slowly or sticking to my current plan of

    Mon 12m
    Tues swim
    Wed 12m
    Thursday swim
    Fri hill sprints
    Sat swim
    Sunday rest add 3-5 miles a week?
     
  12. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    1.50 is a good time for a first half. You are tired because you are not having a rest day, unless I've read your post wrong. Your body needs to recover and you need to allow one day a week for rest. Even in RT you get Sunday off.

    I would move the Wednesday 12 miler down to Saturday. Sunday would be a rest day and the Monday run I would drop to around 5 to start with at a slow recovery pace. I would also swap one of the midweek swims for a run of 6 to 8 miles.

    Either way, when you can go out and run 10 miles and hold a conversation, either with a friend, or yourself, as you are running, then you are into serious running and things will only improve. Your distance then will be governed by time and not your body.

    Good luck

    Alan
     
  13. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    I can hold a conversation at 10 miles or I'd say almost there was really my legs letting me down aside from that I found it quite easy (i stopped smoking 3/4 months ago and it's really starting to pay off cv wise)

    I am taking rest on a Sunday and the swims are very light (planned roughly 10 lengths various strokes few hypoxic widths) and only for recovery really (i should have added that) I was still a touch tight from Monday (i did 10miles on Monday but felt comfortable so added the two extra miles today then proceeded to struggle the last two ironically.

    So to summarise
    Monday 5 miles
    Tuesday swim
    Wednesday 6-8 miles
    Thursday swim
    Fridayswim
    Saturday 12m
    Sunday rest
    This would be a more realistic programme? What sort of miles should I aim to add each week?
     
  14. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    I can hold a conversation at 10 miles or I'd say almost there was really my legs letting me down aside from that I found it quite easy (i stopped smoking 3/4 months ago and it's really starting to pay off cv wise)

    I am taking rest on a Sunday and the swims are very light (planned roughly 10 lengths various strokes few hypoxic widths) and only for recovery really (i should have added that) I was still a touch tight from Monday (i did 10miles on Monday but felt comfortable so added the two extra miles today then proceeded to struggle the last two ironically.

    So to summarise
    Monday 5 miles
    Tuesday swim
    Wednesday 6-8 miles
    Thursday swim
    Fridayswim
    Saturday 12m
    Sunday rest
    This would be a more realistic programme? What sort of miles should I aim to add each week?
     
  15. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    That looks a good programme. Just remember that your Monday run is recovery.
    For half marathons aim to add a couple of miles per week. There is also nothing wrong with building up your long run in excess of 13 miles over time. That will give you confidence at that distance and you will find that your times will drop as your body gets used to running distance.
    My fastest half was 1.31, but I was sub 70 minutes at 10 miles and going like a train, but run out of legs, so no sub 1.30 unfortunately.
    Alan
     
  16. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Thanks again for the help I'll keep you posted on how it goes if I can get these legs to go the distance I'm hoping I can get my sub 4hours for the full marathon. I'll add to my distance run on the Saturday as often as I'm confident and keep Monday as my recovery.

    I'll keep 1.31 in mind during my training see if I can get close to it.
     
  17. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    The programme I have shown you would be suitable for a half marathon. If you want to move up to a full then you need to be running six days a week, with a long run on a Sunday and rest on Monday. Start off with a base of 25 miles a week and increase by around 3 miles a week up to a max of around 55 to 60 four weeks before the event and then taper down sharply. You should be looking at around 15 miles in your last week.

    What I would point out is that training for a marathon is totally different to training for RT. The two programmes do not mix at all, so I'm not sure where you are in the process, but do not put faith that the above will get you through RT. Look to @arny01 for help in that area. He's definitely your man there.

    What I will say is that by the end of RT you will be able to pitch up at any event and bash out a half with no real preparation; you will be that fit.

    Alan
     
  18. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    I'm at the very early stages of rejoining just got paperwork through and will need to go to my AFCO next week the plan is do a marathon over summer (I've always wanted to do one that and will give me a good mental boost for the EC). Once I've done that I was going to switch to Arnys training plan to build up my aerobic fitness/bodyweight exercises. In an ideal world I'll be ready for RT early next year.
     
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  19. DJANGO

    DJANGO Member

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    Google Hal higdon, there's a website with all sorts of running plans from 5k to marathon with novice, intermediate and expert levels of each
     
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  20. Vine

    Vine Active Member

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    Went and signed up for the fort William marathon, ironically the spean bridge Commando memorial is on the route if anyone fancies coming along its running on July 31st.