Medical Examination- What's involved?

Discussion in 'Stickies/Frequently Asked Questions' started by Ninja_Stoker, Apr 18, 2013.

  1. Jaykay2343

    Jaykay2343 Active Member

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    I couldn't touch my toes and I passed.
     
  2. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Depends on the apparent flexibility/fitness of the individual. Some people can lay the palms of their hands flat on the floor when bending forward, keeping their legs straight, others can't get anywhere near that but the Doc is looking to see that there are no rigid/inflexible vertebrae sections in the back.

    A good way of increasing and maintaining flexibility is dorsal press-ups, where your pelvis downwards remain in contact with the deck and the other is to lay flay on your back, drawing your knees up to your chest and holding your knees against your chest for a slow count of five. Obviously sit-ups help too.
     
  3. Hubb97

    Hubb97 Member

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    Cheers, a bit late but I appreciate the responses. If anyone was wondering I actually passed first time which I believe is quite rare so feel quite lucky! Cannot stress the importance of getting your medical notes ready enough, I believe simply doing that could have potentially saved me months due to previous doctor appointments. My only issue now is that my knee is still playing up a bit and as a result I'm not quite fit enough for the PJFT yet so probably going to have to give my CA a call to get it deferred whilst I sort my knee out. It's one of them annoying ones that isn't severe but lingers and seems to take a fair bit of physiotherapy to get rid of. Hoping to at least run 3x a week and more physio and hopefully upwards from there. Thanks for the help!
     
  4. posh_punter

    posh_punter New Member

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    Chaps,

    I had a naval medical around 12 months ago for the RNR and passed, although they had to ask my doctor for details of something, which took a month..... I'm now in the process of going into the RMR instead and need to get another medical in time for PRMC in March. I;ve been given a date about one and half weeks before I'm due to go on PRMC.

    Does anyone know it it's the same deal the second time round, or will it be more of a tick box thing? Likewise, if they needed confirmation from my doctor last time about a past ailment, will they need this again?

    Basically just trying to whether I need to pull out all the stops to get an earlier appointment and whether I need to dig out my medical records.
     
  5. Gregor1995

    Gregor1995 New Member

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    Just sifting through all the medical threads as I have mine coming up in March. You talk about taking your medical history notes, I've been TMU for 6 months regrading conditions I was wrongly diagnosed with as a baby. I've had numerous phone calls with Capita and visits to my GP in recent months to get all of it cleared up, heart scans etc.
    Do I need to take stuff with me? I ask because is it not something they will have to hand now that I've already provided them with it? Or do I need to duplicate everything and take it with?

    Also, before I decided to try for the marines I was heavily into weight lifting, I'm a fairly short guy with a naturally stocky build, the weight lifting exaggerated that and I would say I'm out of proportion, despite all the cardio the muscle built hasn't decreased as much as I would have hoped. I would imagine my BMI would be totally out - is it something to be concerned about?
     
  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    The recommendation to take copies of your medical notes is a carry-over from when they used to do the medical first, then render you TMU whilst they obtained your notes to check the background - it isn't actually necessary anymore. That said if it was me, I'd want of copy of whatever your GP discloses so that if you are knocked-back, you have the same information as Capita to hand and can determine whether an appeal is viable. With regard letting a misdiagnosed issue go to Capita first and then trying to resolve it, with the benefit of hindsight, would've been far easier and quicker to address before, rather than after.

    BMI must be under 28, waist less than 94 cms. Whilst we all appreciate the bmi scale has flaws, it's the standard applied for entry due to the fact those carrying extra mass, be it muscle or fat, will be far more susceptible to lower limb injury during the CV elements of recruit training. Best bet? See what the doc advises, I've seen rugby players with a bmi of 32 passed fit....only to bail-out of recruit training within four weeks due to injury. You need to be a lithe racing snake rather than muscle bosun to successfully complete recruit training.
     
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  7. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Just to add, it may not necessarily help those who have already appealed their medical suitability for service but the internal appeals process is under review and a more streamlined approach envisaged.

    From the appellants perspective, the advice as ever, is to do the groundwork before submitting an appeal.

    Make sure you have as much supporting evidence as possible from qualified sources, where necessary and relevant produce evidence of activities which demonstrate a full recovery. ie: a proper training diary in the case of a mechanical injury, not just a list of claimed exercises. A record of physically or mentally demanding arduous work is also useful. A 100% record of attendance in education or work which demonstrates the issue hasn't affected your wellbeing, etc.

    Keep the letter of appeal brief - let the evidence speak. Do not enter into arguing the interpretation of the medical standards for entry - the latest publications aren't in the public domain via any official source so you could well be barking up the wrong tree in any case.

    Whilst the frustration is appreciated never enter into a rambling long-winded tirade, it won't work. Short & polite every time.
     
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  8. borneboy

    borneboy New Member

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    do they check your knees? what if they crack
     
  9. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Lower limbs are closely scrutinised due to the nature of recruit training. The issue is more a case of mobility without pain or restriction. Crepitus is not an automatic bar but the cause of it could bear further investigation.
     
  10. borneboy

    borneboy New Member

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    As long as your knees dont have any pain then you are fine? both of my knees do crack alot when a bend at the joint.

    Thanks for replying sir!
     
  11. Bear4236

    Bear4236 New Member

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    I broke my scaphoid playing football and the cast is still on so I don't know how it's healed yet but is there anyone else who has broken their scaphoid and recovered fine and passed the medical or even how would the operation affect my chances of getting in if I have to have it done?
    Thanks
     
  12. DBenn01

    DBenn01 Active Member

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    How are things?

    Just a quick one. Would having scar tissue effect the medicals outcome? Even if it is extremely minimal and had never caused issues or needed to be looked at again? Would it matter how old the scar is?

    Thank you kindly.
     
  13. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Broken wrist usually means 12 months before you can be passed fit at medical. If plates or pins need to be used, they usually (but not always) require to be removed before you can be declared fit to enter.
    Depends on the origins of the scars. If they are from an operation, they will want to know about the procedure. If they are from an injury or self harm, they will again need to know the history.
     
  14. ry07

    ry07 Member

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    Is that just for the wrist with regards to pins & plates? Only reason I ask is I'm recovering from surgery which was a wrist injury, however I do have pins & a plate but not in the wrist it's my radial that has them?
     
  15. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    It'll be the medical examiner's call. Generally plates & pins need to be removed from any broken bones - not always, but often.
     
  16. ry07

    ry07 Member

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    Ok will have to see what they say regarding it, thanks for the heads up ninja.
     
  17. ry07

    ry07 Member

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    @Ninja_Stoker I've just quickly read your post again, sorry to be picky here & I know the ultimate decision is with the medical staff, but my injury isn't a break. Mine was a slightly different thing. They have cut about 5mm out of my radial and screwed it back together, would that still be classed as a break in regards to the medical standards? As you said they need to be removed from broken bones?
     
  18. DBenn01

    DBenn01 Active Member

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    Thanks for that Ninja, much appreciated!
     
  19. Boplicity

    Boplicity New Member

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    Hi just a quick one. What is the regs on fungal toe nail infection? Apart from being called toe jam of course!
     
  20. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    My guess is it's fairly common amongst recruits but you need to look after your plates and the bits and bobs (to use medical parlance) that are attached.

    Try to get rid of the fungal thing, it'll take time, but don't give up.
     

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