Medical Standards for Entry

Fibonarchie

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@Ninja_Stoker are those medical conditions mentioned in the original post bars to all entry to service, or are there other roles that wouldn’t have such stringent measures?
Cheers,
Fibo
 

Ninja_Stoker

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@Ninja_Stoker are those medical conditions mentioned in the original post bars to all entry to service, or are there other roles that wouldn’t have such stringent measures?
Cheers,
Fibo
They are generic medical standards across the Naval Service but it's worth bearing in mind standards and regulations do change. The RN & RM sometimes operates single-service policies in some areas so the only way to be certain is to apply to the respective service and see what they declare.

The tri-service medical standards, from which each service derives their entry standards are within Section Four of the Joint Service Publication, JSP 950
 

Viking_axe

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@Ninja_Stoker Do all three services tend to follow the medical standards to the same extent? Or, as a random example, is it the case that the Royal Navy/ Royal Marines are less liberal when judging musculoskeletal injuries than the Army or RAF, despite officially using the same standards.
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Ninja_Stoker

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@Ninja_Stoker Do all three services tend to follow the medical standards to the same extent? Or, as a random example, is it the case that the Royal Navy/ Royal Marines are less liberal when judging musculoskeletal injuries than the Army or RAF, despite officially using the same standards.
Cheers
They are all based on JSP950 but the RN/RM tend to be more risk averse with lower limb issues than say, the Army. ACL reconstruction being a case in point.

My understanding is it's all based on risk & cost to rehabilitate.
 

JT_Welsh

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Nasal deformity ? sufficient to interfere with breathing apparatus and similar devices

Does anyone know if this applies for a deviated septum (I’m assuming it does). Also, would the procedure to fix the deviated septum (due to a physical accident) bar/deny entry?
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Does anyone know if this applies for a deviated septum (I’m assuming it does). Also, would the procedure to fix the deviated septum (due to a physical accident) bar/deny entry?
Hopefully @The guide or @CHUB! can advise.

My initial thoughts are that as long as you can use gas masks (respirators) and firefighting breathing apparatus without issue, it should be OK.
 

Johnny_Anonie

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What's involved in the Beighton Test? And how is it passed/graded?

It’s the test in which you have to duck walk and do all manner of weird movements.

Essentially it is a screening technique for hypermobility. I think it includes about 10 different movements that check elbow and knee movements along with thumb and finger movements.
 

BTILC

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@Ninja_Stoker I’m currently suffering from shin splints, I’ve been to physios etc but no luck. If I go to my doctors and it does eventually get better it will be on my record. Will this cause me to fail my medical even if/when I’m fully recovered.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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@Ninja_Stoker I’m currently suffering from shin splints, I’ve been to physios etc but no luck. If I go to my doctors and it does eventually get better it will be on my record. Will this cause me to fail my medical even if/when I’m fully recovered.
As long as you are fully recovered, treatment free & have a decent training diary on strava or similar to show there's been no recurrence, you should be OK.

No point joining with a niggle because otherwise it'll get worse during training.

Orthotic insoles incidentally, are no longer a bar to entry.
 

MRR46

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Can anyone tell me what would the medical team deem as a high blood pressure? Mine sits around 130/60 normally but that’s after a days work. I did a reading today on an empty stomach and it was actually sitting at 125/65.
 

Johnny_Anonie

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Can anyone tell me what would the medical team deem as a high blood pressure? Mine sits around 130/60 normally but that’s after a days work. I did a reading today on an empty stomach and it was actually sitting at 125/65.

My understanding is high blood pressure is considered to be 140/90mmHg or higher.


Normal blood pressure range is considered to be between 90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg. @The guide may be able to comment more if he spots this.
 

BTILC

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As long as you are fully recovered, treatment free & have a decent training diary on strava or similar to show there's been no recurrence, you should be OK.

No point joining with a niggle because otherwise it'll get worse during training.

Orthotic insoles incidentally, are no longer a bar to entry.
Thanks for the reply,
What do you mean by treatment? I’ve had like massages, hot and cold therapy etc.
 
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