More and more books!

Binary

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So for those of us who like to read factual stuff, this is what i've read in the past few months. I'm not a book critic, so feel free to ask me if you'd like a bit more detail about a particular title and i'll try to get back to you asap.


A short history of th Royal Marines:

As far as i'm aware you might recieve this on arrival to RT. Absolutely must read as it covers the whole history, upto 2006 (in the latest edition), in a brief but well structured manner. Also contains information reagrding the Corp's badge, memorable dates, 3Cdo. Brigade structure and other useful information. Well worth the investment!

The Making of a Royal Marines Commando:
Fantastic light reading and one to hand to your mother to keep her content, well my mum stopped at the artic training bless her. Contains slightly outdated (?) inforrmation about RT and some of the other day to day aspects of the Royal Marines. A good read for general information about the marines.

By Sea by Land:
Absolutely love this book! A bit hefty but is litterally full of stories from marines past and present and their accounts of what was really going on in the trenches, deserts and ice fields of past wars. Slightly more indepth, but for those of us with very little history knowledge it helps to fill in all the gaps.

Illustrated Manual of Sniper Skills:
Couldn't help myself, i'd like to give the course a go when i get the chance so i thought i'd try to swot up a bit. A colourful picture loaded book but doesn't quite make it as a 'field manual' much to my disappointment. Does however cover the whole subject and is very enlightening to those who just think a snipers role is 'slotting' human targets. Personally i'd say save your money and wait for the real thing in training. Mum still thinks we'll get a knock on the door from MI5 anytime now.
If anyone can reccomend a good book about 'sniping techniques' i'd be greatful

1The Sas Tracking & Navigation handbook:
Don't know what a map is? Don't know what Longditude/Latitude are or where they come from? Want map reading techniques and some basics on tracking and evasion? then this is the book for you!
To be honest i'm finding this tough going, as its a little mundane. However it is fantastically well written can could be useful to amatuer and intermediate alike. Ignoring the 'SAS' bulls*text deleted*t on the cover, its actually much like a school book, making it simple to read if not a little stale. I let you know in a month or two when i can be arsed to finish it and whether i can find my way home from the pub drunk.

On Killing:The Psychological Cost of Learning to Kill in War and Society:
Okay serious topic. This is not a light read but is extremely addictive. It is a report on a 5 year study into the emotions and repercussions of killing, published in 1996. Starting with the suject of non-firers it aims to enlighten people about the taboo subject of 'killing'.

Not finished this either yet but finding it fascinating and hard to put down, however i don't agree with the author that computer games are affecting society in a negative way like he claims, otherwise i'd be a steaming psycho, well more of one :weird:

I'll try to keep this up to date with all the random and tenuously related books i'll churn through in the following months of training for my PRMC.
 

Touchstone

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Some good stuff you posted in there, will look into. My only problem is I can sometimes get bored with the factual stuff if it's not written right, I prefer personnel accounts (in graphic detail). I like it to be light and easy to read.

I read a book about Soviet troop movements and high command on the Eastern Front. It made for very dull reading, because of constant and very detailed info about units and more units. So many Soviet armies and divisions where stamped into the dust by the Germans it's unbelievable. Nonetheless a good viewpoint for war on the Eastern Front.

I have always had a fascination with war on the Eastern Front, being the largest, most violent and brutal theatre of war in history which came to end with cataclysmic defeat of Germany at the hands of the Soviet juggernaut.


Armageddon Ost

A good read. Much better and lighter than the aforementioned book, it looks into the crushing defeat of Germany in 1944 - 45, some good pictures in there.

Slims Burma Boys
I just read this, several accounts of British soldiers in the Pacific fighting against the Japanese under General Slim.


Citizen Soldiers

A great read, about the ETO (European Theatre of Operations). It's light reading. It carries on every aspect of the ETO, the major events, strategies, logistics, as well as individual accounts from both sides.

Sniper on the Eastern Front
I recommend you read this, it is very addictive. It looks at the life of a 18 year old German sniper, one of the second best in the Wehrmacht with 257 kills, who managed to survive 3 years on the Eastern Front. It shows the prodigious skill and deadly nerve required to be a sniper in that position, as well as the violence and brutality encountered with the crushing advance of the Red Army.

That's all I'm going to put in there for now. Sorry it's not RM related, but interesting all the same (I hope).
 
S

Sotiris

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Good posts lads, thanks a lot. This is the kind of posting we need more of.

I have always had a fascination with war on the Eastern Front said:
I totally agree. It has always reeeally pissed me off how ignorant many Brits (and probabaly most other nations) are to how much we owe the Russians. We always sing about 2 World Wars and one world cup...I've always said the Russians won the war and paid the highest price for it.

I'm not sure but I think it's called "The forgotten soldier". About a young German soldier for Poland who gets sent to the Eastern Front. You may like it.
 

Binary

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Afghanistan: Land of Conflict and Beauty
*Cover and title are different to those displayed in the link.

John C. Griffiths has released an update to the previous Afghanistan: Land of Conflict which brings it up to 2008. It is a well informed often first hand, personal account of Afghanistan?s history, culture, politics and geographical make-up. Starting from a brief look at its early history and origins it explains the huge diversity of 'Afghans', paints a detailed picture of the lead up and events of the Soviet Invasion, coups and counter coups before and after. Finishing on a good explanation of the 'Taliban' and the other issues such as the poppy farming issue it also makes light of the various political games played and is quite open and honest about issues of oil pipelines and military funding.

Easy to read in a few days well worth the time for any potential YO, there is a substantial reading list in the back for those who wish to learn more about the various areas the book touches on such as Taliban Ideology and Afghanistan?s war torn history.
 

jm745

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Good posts lads, thanks a lot. This is the kind of posting we need more of.

I have always had a fascination with war on the Eastern Front said:
I totally agree. It has always reeeally *text deleted**text deleted**text deleted* me off how ignorant many Brits (and probabaly most other nations) are to how much we owe the Russians. We always sing about 2 World Wars and one world cup...I've always said the Russians won the war and paid the highest price for it.

I'm not sure but I think it's called "The forgotten soldier". About a young German soldier for Poland who gets sent to the Eastern Front. You may like it.
Although that is very true,
the Russians did commit a lot of war crimes along the way,
they also made deals with Hitler to split up Poland,
so although yes WW2 wouldn't have been won without the Russians,
I like to think countries like Britain and America fought for what was right,
and went about it in the right way.
 

Phoenix

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Heres a list I made awhile back in a previous post, there maybe some books below that maybe of interest :)

bThe Quite Soldier/b - Adam Ballinger - Tells an account of the author trying out for the T.A SAS

For Queen and Country - Nigel "spud" Ely - about the para's and spud in the falklands

Squaddie a soldiers story - Steven McLaughlin - Tells of the authors plight to join the Royal Green Jackets he passed the combat infantrymans course aged 31. Some recruiting SGT found a loop hole that allowed him to join even though he was passed the official joining age. If memory serves me right he joined the marines and at the time Laser eye surgery was new he had this done but did not declare it they found out and he was ejected.

The Making of a Royal Marine Commando - Nigel Foster - explores the training and looks at the type of people that go on to pass out as a marine.

Just another soldier - Jason Christopher Hartley - Tells of his experiences whilst serving in Iraq.

Jarhead - Anthony Swafford - If you have seen Jarhead this goes into a little more depth.

Band Of Brothers - Stephen Ambrose - Tells of easy company's adventures during WW2.

Major d i c k Winters memoires - I dont have this book to hand my wife has tidied it away *text deleted*. This is a great read again about his time in easy company during WW2.

Commando - Chris Terrill - I think most of you know of this book.

Eye of the storm - Peter Ratcliffe - Tells of this man starting life as a para and rising to a Major in the SAS if memory serves me correctly. Covers a little bit about the ill fated Chris Ryan patrol (was it ANdy McNab who commanded this) anyway Peter Ratcliffe has a few interesting things to say about this.

Commando's - John Parker - Explores the history of the marines and commando;s

The Royal Marines From Sea soldiers to a Special force - Julian Thompson - massive book covering the marine history up to a probably a bit past the falklands (cant say as Ive not finished it yet)

To Hell and Back - Audie Murphy - Tells of his life before and during WW2. Its sad he is one of the most or maybe even then most decorated American during WW2 he survived that and a poor child hood only to die in a plane crash in the 60's.

Dusty Warriors - Richard Holmes - An account of his time in Iraq

Boy Soldiers of the Great War - Richard Van Emden - This is about all the under age soldiers who fought in WW1.

A Drop too many - Maj Gen John Frost - An account of his life including his military career and of course his role in OPeration Market garden specifically the bridge at Arnhem.

Royal Marine commando's an inside story of a force for the future - John Parker - AGain similar to commando's it just explores the role and history or the commando's

Barefoot Soldier - Johnson Beharry VC - An autobiography very good read.

And lastly but by no means least our very own the one the only Ste Preece's two books - Amongst the Marines and Always a Marine.
 

AdmiralAwesome

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I'm a bit short for time, so I'll just do one:

'Hell In A Very Small Place - The Siege Of Dien Bien Phu' by Bernard B. Fall.

A very good, detailed account of the siege, from the planning stages of the French 'airland base', the fortification of the valley and the eventual fall of the always doomed fortress. If anyone thinks the French as a nation can't fight, read this book! Algerians, Morrocans, Vietnamese, French and Legion troops fought tooth and nail for every scrap of land, and counterattacked again, and again. Men literally died from exhaustion.

Some of the stories that come from the battle are incredible. 'The Angel Of Dien Bien Phu' who comforted the wounded in the underground hospital, the 'Paratroop Rebellion' (Paratroop Colonels taking control of the defense of the fortress), the indomitable Major Bigeard...

Anyway, brilliant read, a heroic and tragic story.
 

3CdoBrg

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Dr. seuss's Green Eggs and Ham. extremely hard to put down, i deffintly recommend it for those who havent read it
 

ibanez237

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Just finished Sniper One, fantastic book, I strongly recommend it to those who haven't read it, plenty of action to keep you drawn in, and pretty funny too. Just about to crack in to Bravo Two Zero, everyone i've spoken to seems to know about it so I thought i'd be stupid not to read it.
 

Binary

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Just finished Sniper One, fantastic book, I strongly recommend it to those who haven't read it, plenty of action to keep you drawn in, and pretty funny too. Just about to crack in to Bravo Two Zero, everyone i've spoken to seems to know about it so I thought i'd be stupid not to read it.
Totally agree Sniper One was an easily accesible, funny and exhilirating to read. I just wonder if the bit at the end with fighting in flipflops was artistic license?
 

Qwerty123

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Just finished Sniper One, fantastic book, I strongly recommend it to those who haven't read it, plenty of action to keep you drawn in, and pretty funny too. Just about to crack in to Bravo Two Zero, everyone i've spoken to seems to know about it so I thought i'd be stupid not to read it.
Another thumbs up for Sniper One.

Bravo Two Zero - available in pretty much every charity shop in the uk! Good read though!
 

Dansusername

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Cant believe this book's not on here!

The scars of war by Hugh McManners, an ex- royal marine and SBS soldier amongst other things.

This book seriously made me consider joining the forces, and if I get in im sure to be glad I read it.
Its a great read (although shocking at times) and covers the effects of war on soldiers psychologically, or anyone that goes through trauma for that matter, it considers and compares the training that UK forces, US forces, Isreali forces and special forces go through and focuses a lot on the officers in particular.

It contains lots of dialogue and statements from the soldiers, sailors, officers, higher ranks and padres themselves whom he has interviewed, the study is focused on the falklands, vietnam and Iraq, some parts are a complete run through of the falklands war from commando's and para soldiers perspectives which is amazing, makes you see what war is all about and the sheer confusion and unreality of it all.
And of course the after affects that some suffer from, often post traumatic stress disorder which can surface within a few years upto 25+ years after the trauma and how the recognition of this disorder has evolved from having padres deal with men considered weak and having a lack of moral fibre to having psychologists/psychiatrists dealing with the mens issues.
There is a chapter on each of the; Navy sailors, RAF pilots and Ground forces and shows their perspective of the effects.
 

Aron19920

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im going to get that Sniper of the Eastern front and i have read the Making of a Royal Marines Commando, a very intresting book!
 

Salway

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one good read i've read is
3 commando Brigade
its about 3 commando brigades '06-'07 tour of Afghanistan. Its really interesting and a great book to read for anyone :applaus:
 

Adam.126

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i got a book called matt croucher bullet proof
quality read.
he tells us about his experiences on tours he did in iraq and some points it is pretty graphic and goes into a lot of detail. then about a bit of life in commando training which is allways good to read. the main point of the book being how he pinned a grenade to the floor with his day sack saving the lives of a few lads in his troop which he got awarded with by the george cross.
id recommend it
 

westy

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Man Down - Mark Ormrod
An ordinary soldier and task force Helmand - Doug Beattie
First into Action - Duncan Falconer
Black Water - Don Camsell

For fiction, try any by Duncan Falconer but think the Operative is by far the best, also Andy Mcnab and Chris Ryans later work not the older stuff. Pleny of books from soldiers from Afghan though like Attack State red etc
 
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