Muscle Fatigue

johnny_sloth

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Hi lads, don’t know if anyone else has
come across this:

I’m at quite an early stage in my training and I find that after performing exercises e.g. press-ups, pull-ups etc, for up to a few days after my muscles are still fatigued and I’m unable to train properly again. This is annoying when I’m trying to stick to a programme, as I know I can do the reps but just physically can’t having done them the previous day.

I’m sure some would suggest improving muscular endurance would help, but my question is how can I do that when I can’t actually perform the exercises for days at a time?

Thanks lads
 

B11

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I’d try doing less reps on the first day, then have fewer days between and build the reps up over time that way
 

mace

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Hi, let me give you a bit of advice as an ex S&C coach and sports therapist:
As you said, you are new to training, therefore, your body is not accustomed to the exercises and loads you are doing that is why you are experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).
To reduce the occurrence of DOMS make sure you do a very thorough warm-up

and stretching lower body:

upper body:

Also, as you are getting more experience you will know how much work you can safely do without getting sore the following days. One of the best advice I was ever given was to make sure you are never sore. When you never sore, you can train almost every day without overtraining yourself. Consequently, it leads to a greater work capacity compared to someone who can only train 3 times a week due to being sore/injured thus requiring a longer time to recover between workouts. That's it in a nutshell.
 

johnny_sloth

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Hi, let me give you a bit of advice as an ex S&C coach and sports therapist:
As you said, you are new to training, therefore, your body is not accustomed to the exercises and loads you are doing that is why you are experiencing delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS).
To reduce the occurrence of DOMS make sure you do a very thorough warm-up

and stretching lower body:

upper body:

Also, as you are getting more experience you will know how much work you can safely do without getting sore the following days. One of the best advice I was ever given was to make sure you are never sore. When you never sore, you can train almost every day without overtraining yourself. Consequently, it leads to a greater work capacity compared to someone who can only train 3 times a week due to being sore/injured thus requiring a longer time to recover between workouts. That's it in a nutshell.
Very helpful, thank you. I probably need to pay a bit more attention to the warm-ups and stretches. Interesting point about not allowing yourself to ache - I guess all I’ve ever heard is you need to ache to know you’ve worked yourself, but what you’re saying makes perfect sense. I’ll try it out!
 

mace

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Very helpful, thank you. I probably need to pay a bit more attention to the warm-ups and stretches. Interesting point about not allowing yourself to ache - I guess all I’ve ever heard is you need to ache to know you’ve worked yourself, but what you’re saying makes perfect sense. I’ll try it out!
There is a difference in training to get fit for RT and being in RT. During RT you just suck up the little niggles and carry on (unless it's something more serious of course that indeed requires medical attention) and hope for the best you won't get injured. If you are well prepared, chances are you won't, unless it's caused by direct trauma which is just bad luck.
 

stumpylegs

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When gyms are open again use sauna’s, doesn’t matter if you over work and are sore a bit because if you stretch in a Sauna you’re good to go the next day, combine that with ice baths an hour after exercise. I recommend sauna after then ice bath a minimum of an hour after sauna because exercise creates good stress and inflammation in the body. It needs the inflammation to create a response to recover. Look at doctor Rhonda Patrick’s work or her interviews on sauna’s on the joe rogan podcast.
 

johnny_sloth

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There is a difference in training to get fit for RT and being in RT. During RT you just suck up the little niggles and carry on (unless it's something more serious of course that indeed requires medical attention) and hope for the best you won't get injured. If you are well prepared, chances are you won't, unless it's caused by direct trauma which is just bad luck.
Yep, not expecting the luxury of much time to rest in RT, just want to get my body to a stage where it can take the battering.
 

johnny_sloth

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When gyms are open again use sauna’s, doesn’t matter if you over work and are sore a bit because if you stretch in a Sauna you’re good to go the next day, combine that with ice baths an hour after exercise. I recommend sauna after then ice bath a minimum of an hour after sauna because exercise creates good stress and inflammation in the body. It needs the inflammation to create a response to recover. Look at doctor Rhonda Patrick’s work or her interviews on sauna’s on the joe rogan podcast.
Thanks mate, something I’ll definitely try when we can get back in the gym.
 
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