Muscle gain pre-prmc

03hlevitt

New Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Posts
8
Reaction score
4
Hi all,

Although this could fit in the POC thread I feel as if it is more of a general set of q's that could also apply to the prmc so have posted this thread accordingly.

I made a post on here a while ago. I am currently in my last year of uni and training with British triathlon. Since there is (realistically) no money in triathlon I have decided to go for another career path instead (after a large amount of thought and consideration) and, so, last week, I submitted my application to become a royal marines officer. I chatted to the recruiter on the phone and this helped me as it further emphasized how difficult to make the batch to become an officer in the marines and that attention to every single detail was key in the application process.

Whilst training for elite level triathlon, strength and muscular condition is included in our training but it is often neglected (particularly in my case) somewhat. I expressed my concern to the recruiter that despite my calisthenic fitness not being awful, my skinny frame (11 stone at 5 foot 11) was worrying my as i thought it would hold my back when it came to the weight bearing exercises that the application process entails. Should I be worried about putting on a few pounds?

Moreover, I would like to start training slightly away from triathlon and more towards the royal marines application process and although the two compliment each other massively (I can run 3 miles in 15 minutes flat) there are some issues. Firstly, our S + C sessions are only twice a week and one hour long, this might sound ok but since we train 30 hours a week on the three disciplines I doubt it is having that much affect. I was thinking that maybey cutting out some of the cycling, and possibly running and replacing this with gym sessions either focused on bodyweight or lifting exercises. Does this sound like the advisable thing to do?

In addition to this, I have had a look through some of the training methods to get fit for the body weight exercises inlcuding EMOMs, gainers, training to the beep etc. and I was wondering which of those people had found to causes the least amount of DOMs as I do not want it to put too much extra load on my already ridiculous training regime.

Any responses would be greatly appreciated,
Harry
 

Pastafarian

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Posts
11
Reaction score
10
Your current training regime will obviously need to change. You cannot put on mass without getting DOMS - you will need to choose - initial DOMS is to be expected until your nervous system gets used to the workload and movements. Of course you can put on "a few pounds", though the amount you will need to eat will be enormous to make gains in this direction - even if you are 75 kg and low body fat, running 200m with an 80kg bloke on your back with all his kit is bloody hard work. Eat. Eat and eat some more.
 

03hlevitt

New Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Posts
8
Reaction score
4
Your current training regime will obviously need to change. You cannot put on mass without getting DOMS - you will need to choose - initial DOMS is to be expected until your nervous system gets used to the workload and movements. Of course you can put on "a few pounds", though the amount you will need to eat will be enormous to make gains in this direction - even if you are 75 kg and low body fat, running 200m with an 80kg bloke on your back with all his kit is bloody hard work. Eat. Eat and eat some more.
Do you reckon 3 S + C sessions a week is a enough and then push ups, pull ups and sit ups on the days in between to further that? Or heavily reduce my cardio as it is so strong and focus on gaining weight?
 

03hlevitt

New Member
Joined
Oct 27, 2017
Posts
8
Reaction score
4
Considering I have applied 13 months in advance quite probably a long while
 

Pastafarian

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Posts
11
Reaction score
10
Obviously, you will have a very large base of cardio - but this makes it very hard for you to be strong, even more so if you continue your current cardio volume and intensity. Despite what many people might lead you to believe, muscle mass is not always a bad thing - one needn’t come at the cost of the other.

Your problem will be in choosing wether to be truly focused on POC as your number one priority - I might be wrong, but it seems from your initial post that you are a bit half cocked about going about the application - your triathlon will likely have to come a distant second if your strength isn’t up to scratch.

FWIW a large amount of strength and power is neurological: muscle fibre recruitment is important - we have all met the guy who looks weedy but has incredible power; this makes us able to generate power, without putting on a lot of muscle mass, and it can be achieved quickly. I would suggest a program based around developing a foundation of genuine strength for 3 - 6 months or so alongside a reduced cardio program (maintain the cardio as best you can, don’t build it). In order to make these neurological gains, you will also need to eat a lot more than you are likely used to.

A program based on the 5x5 protocol is what you want, simply focusing on squat, deadlift benchpress and weighted pull ups… (Sacrilege!! Benchpress can be useful in your situation, despite it being passed off as a total waste of time). You can look up good 5 x 5 info online, in particular somewhere like tnation.com .

After that, I would just go to Crossfit, smash it a few times a week along with other more specific workouts and build on running specifics, maintaining your 5 x 5 gains - this will result in you being a far more balanced athlete.

The stronger you are (to a point) the more resilient you will be to getting injured - getting those ligaments and what not in condition for loaded carrys and various other shenanigans takes time

How many pull ups and push ups can you do?
 

Pastafarian

Member
Joined
Jul 25, 2019
Posts
11
Reaction score
10
Go through Mark Rippotoes stuff on Youtube; his book is worth getting as well - " Starting Strength" you can get it on Amazon, its pretty much considered the ne plus ultra of getting legit strong in core lifts and is very much centered on refining technique.

 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
10,451
Reaction score
12,229
I was thinking that maybey cutting out some of the cycling, and possibly running and replacing this with gym sessions either focused on bodyweight or lifting exercises. Does this sound like the advisable thing to do?
Others here far better qualified than I to comment but to put it bluntly as far as I know you will not be required to cycle anywhere during YO training or Other Rank RT.

I'm a road cyclist myself and I think that cycling does have a place in a recovery regime but running should be a higher priority along with body weight training and swimming.
 

Harry McRunFast

Veteran Contributor
Joined
Dec 1, 2019
Posts
566
Reaction score
524
(I can run 3 miles in 15 minutes flat)
Christ, what’s your 1.5 mile return time!?

I think you should adjust your approach a little bit. The whole push/pull/legs approach is a bodybuilding split, and is not necessarily conducive to peak fitness.

You’re obviously extremely fit being a pro triathlete, but athletes are trained to perform under ideal conditions, sleep, nutrition etc... I am speculating as I’m yet to even get to the start line, but, RM RT is not a place where ideal conditions exist. You may want to look into more rugged, robust types of fitness training; circuit training, in environments you’re not used to such as the beach, on grass etc, not just in the gym.

Full body circuit training is really the way to go in my opinion, a variation of exercises hitting the main body parts each workout, 4-5 times per week, will get you in great shape.

Look to do a lot of burpees, bodyweight squats, squat thrusts, various core exercises, (of course the RMFA exercises)... kettlebells are a brilliant way to use resistance. Dynamic in nature, they offer something that barbells and dumbbells can’t.

Good luck!
 
Last edited:

ODB

Member
Joined
Jun 30, 2020
Posts
45
Reaction score
14
Not going to comment on ideal training for the royal marines, but bodyweight circuit training is not really ideal for building mass if that's what OP is after.

EDIT- My comment sounds really blunt but is not intended to be rude. Also agree that 5x5 would be best to gain some strength if the OP is concerned with strength and injury prevention.
 

Charlesg97

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2020
Posts
32
Reaction score
11
Hi all,

Although this could fit in the POC thread I feel as if it is more of a general set of q's that could also apply to the prmc so have posted this thread accordingly.

I made a post on here a while ago. I am currently in my last year of uni and training with British triathlon. Since there is (realistically) no money in triathlon I have decided to go for another career path instead (after a large amount of thought and consideration) and, so, last week, I submitted my application to become a royal marines officer. I chatted to the recruiter on the phone and this helped me as it further emphasized how difficult to make the batch to become an officer in the marines and that attention to every single detail was key in the application process.

Whilst training for elite level triathlon, strength and muscular condition is included in our training but it is often neglected (particularly in my case) somewhat. I expressed my concern to the recruiter that despite my calisthenic fitness not being awful, my skinny frame (11 stone at 5 foot 11) was worrying my as i thought it would hold my back when it came to the weight bearing exercises that the application process entails. Should I be worried about putting on a few pounds?

Moreover, I would like to start training slightly away from triathlon and more towards the royal marines application process and although the two compliment each other massively (I can run 3 miles in 15 minutes flat) there are some issues. Firstly, our S + C sessions are only twice a week and one hour long, this might sound ok but since we train 30 hours a week on the three disciplines I doubt it is having that much affect. I was thinking that maybey cutting out some of the cycling, and possibly running and replacing this with gym sessions either focused on bodyweight or lifting exercises. Does this sound like the advisable thing to do?

In addition to this, I have had a look through some of the training methods to get fit for the body weight exercises inlcuding EMOMs, gainers, training to the beep etc. and I was wondering which of those people had found to causes the least amount of DOMs as I do not want it to put too much extra load on my already ridiculous training regime.

Any responses would be greatly appreciated,
Harry
I'm coming from a similar background; although i don't train at an 'elite' level i'm a relatively fast runner (16:21 5km etc) compete in triathlons, 70.3's and have, in the past, struggled to put on muscle purely down to the amount of calories i burn. I'd advise following Sean Lerwill on Instagram and purchasing his Muscle Gain and/or Marine Prep book (they aren't expensive) https://www.seanlerwill.com/. I think its generally advised not to share resources that cost on here but i think an exception can be made given he had a hand in creating the ROP and is a former RM PTI.

I'm currently following his VJPFT plan and will shortly move on to German Volume Training plan in preparation for my ROP. All the best.
 

Charlesg97

Member
Joined
Jan 13, 2020
Posts
32
Reaction score
11
If theres anyone who doesn't have the spare money to buy the books drop me a message and i'll email you the PDFs over, i have the following....

Royal Marines Prep
Successful Eating
Guide to Muscle Gain
 
  • Like
Reactions: ODB
Top