My running route

Morts

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i'm please with my running route *text deleted*, i have it all mapped out properly, the only thing is i don know whether to go forwards or backwards.

My point being, if i go forwards, ill run about 500 metres and then it a hill for about 1.5k and its steep, then i run down an adjascent hill.

So, im not sure wheter to start off on the hill or finnish off with the hills.

http://www.mapmyrun.com/route/gb/deal/611124656463418676

this is my route.

Mill Hill is a very steep hill, and so is telegraph road. Where i cross the train tracks halfway through is dead on the halfway mark, which is 1.5 miles. From there i can finnish the 3.1 mile run or run into the park and do hill sprints.

I just *text deleted**text deleted** know your verdict, *text deleted* im just really starting training. but cant start properly until im 16, *text deleted* i dont have all the resources available to me :(

Cheers guys :D
 

toffee_colie

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*text deleted* im just really starting training. but cant start properly until im 16, *text deleted* i dont have all the resources available to me :(

What resources exactly?

You only need a pair of running trainers.

You don't need a gym if that's what you mean, you can do circuit training at home to improve your press ups, sit ups and pull ups. You could even do some circuit training outside on a football pitch, throwing some sprints in.

Since you're just starting training, don't push yourself too hard too soon or you could injure yourself. Make sure you warm up properly aswell, it does make a difference.
 
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stokey_14

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why does it have to be one way or the other... variety is the spice of life so they say!

Stokey
 

carrington123

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resources??

anyway the start of the best effort 1.5 on prmc is a slight hill so starting with a hill in your route may help... either way like stokey says vary it up, and like toffie says you really dont need a gym to workout
 

Morts

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yeah but this hill is mega steep, ill give it a go and if its too difficult ill go the other way and try it again after a few weeks

I know i dont NEED a gym but i was reading on another thread about weights and they can help with starting out pullups by doing higher reps of lower than your body weight
 

carrington123

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buy a bar from argos which comes with weights and use that...work on your upper back, rear delts and biceps....although *text deleted* i progressed my pull ups simply by doing them *text deleted*
 

GREGORS

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By going down the gym you'll have access to a lateral pull down machine. You can then change the weight. Also, at a gym you might be lucky and you'll have access to an assisted chin and dip machine therefore you'll be able to do sets of 15 pull ups gradually with your own body weight. Or you can by a strong elastic resistance band put that over the pull up bar then you have assisted pull ups.
 
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stokey_14

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By going down the gym you'll have access to a lateral pull down machine. You can then change the weight. Also, at a gym you might be lucky and you'll have access to an assisted chin and dip machine therefore you'll be able to do sets of 15 pull ups gradually with your own body weight. Or you can by a strong elastic resistance band put that over the pull up bar then you have assisted pull ups.

Personally I?d stay away from machines as a general rule of thumb... lat pull downs are a weaker movement in-comparison to pull ups and I wouldn't waste my time, fair enough if you can't perform a pull up, do negatives, resistance band pull ups etc.


There are very few machines I see the point in using for a healthy non-injured performance based athlete... less stabilisation, fixed plain of motion (often un-natural as the machine can't tend to ones natural biomechanical make up) which can lead to injury, less calories burnt in comparison to there free weight alternative and just all round less skill required etc

Stokey
 

Morts

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whoah this is so confusing, everyone is saying something completely different, im just *text deleted**text deleted** go with the flow and do it.
 

carrington123

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no machines are very important, starting out by just doing free weights is A LOT more dangerous then starting on machines, your body needs to adapt and get used to all the forces you are putting against it in different motions...

to prove my point, next time you go to the gym take a mate who has never done dumbell bench press, give him some light weights and watch how his technique falters all over the place...

you should as a rule of thumb start on machines as a progression toward free weights, and then after one month of good training move on to the lighter free weights, concentrating on form and technique -

however if you cannot get to machine, then use body weights (eg press ups) as progression towards weights
 
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stokey_14

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In my opinion, poor form is poor form, machine or free weight it is dangerous, if the person doing free weights is taught properly from the start then there is no more harm machine or free weight... beginner power lifters don't start by smith machine squatting etc learning form is part of getting stronger, the body has to learn how to bench/ clean etc...... as you said take someone who has never done weights before... give them light dumbbells and they might not bench properly, but when learning form the weight should be so light it can't hurt them, show them/tell them where there going wrong and they will soon be benching properly/safely and making better gains than the fella whose 'building up' by machine pressing.

As I mentioned unless the machine is custom made (or luckily built that way ) to your biomechanical make up then it will be forcing you in a different why than your body should go...

Free weights may have a higher risk factor but taught/done properly they are perfectly safe,

Stokey
 

BobNudd

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Spot on Stokey.

Machines are safer in the short term and easier to use. But they're also rubbish for building strength.

Of the guys at my current and previous gyms I've seen a few use machines in a supplementary role. But free weights rule. Start off light and always use proper form, safety issues solved.
 

carrington123

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i dont think you grasped what i was writing bob...yes stokey is correct in that free weights are a much better option any day of the week over machines...HOWEVER.... when you are new to weights in my opinion you are a lot less likely to avoid injury using machines
 
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stokey_14

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i dont think you grasped what i was writing bob...yes stokey is correct in that free weights are a much better option any day of the week over machines...HOWEVER.... when you are new to weights in my opinion you are a lot less likely to avoid injury using machines

I understand this isn't addressed to me, however I do believe that the point about less likely to avoid injury is null and void when you take into account proper coaching and training when learning form on free weights. Injury is always a possibility and because of this you have to compare the risk to gain.

you will gain far more 'real world' (hate to be so vague just didn't want to use the word functional as I hate that even more) strength with minimal risk of injury compared to machine weights... there may be less risk of injury but there?s also less strength gain.

If you?re will not to injure ones self is much greater than achieving optimal training and there for performance then surely light swimming would be the exercise of choice.

Free weights + good form will achieve injury free strength gains amongst other benefits.

I think I said in a post the other day free weight training is in fact the least injury prone activity according to research.

Stokey
 

luke132

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ahh mate you live in deal i used to live there shame i didnt this before i was down there this weekend and went to a 5 mile run and went along the seafront and passed the castle etc
 
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