New Army standards

Discussion in 'Jollies Bar' started by The Creature of the Night, Sep 22, 2018.

  1. The Creature of the Night

    The Creature of the Night Member

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  2. westy

    westy Well-Known Member

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    I actually have a copy of this but for the life of me I can’t get it to upload out if iBooks

    May of done it
     

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  3. corvus

    corvus Member

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    Re the zigzags sounds like a recipe for ankle and knee injuries to me. Footballers and tennis players have special footwear designed to lessen the impact of lateral knee pain and ligament damage after a heavy footed impact in an unusual position.
     
  4. corvus

    corvus Member

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  5. The Creature of the Night

    The Creature of the Night Member

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    Hi there, mate:
    Quoted verbatim:

    'For centuries, young soldiers have been “thrashed” in a hell for leather fitness test to prove they were at the peak of physical strength and battle ready. But in a new scientific overhaul of basic training, the British Army revealed yesterday that combat training will become “gender and age neutral” - because the enemy does not care what sex or how old a soldier is.

    For the last three years, the military has worked with scientists from the University of Chichester to produce new “representative military tasks” that will replace a regime that has been used for the last 20 years.

    While previous tests have varied time limits or requirements depending on age and gender, all of the new tests to be rolled out next year will have a set standard, regardless of how old or the sex of the soldier.

    Introducing the new Physical Employment Standards, Field Army Sergeant Major Gavin Paton said: “I don't care if you are a man or a woman, I don't care what you do, and the enemy doesn't either.”

    In a move designed to recreate the challenges of the modern day battlefield, soldiers in the infantry and armoured units will be required to complete six specially designed physical tests.


    Instead of the old focus on aerobic fitness, with gruelling press-ups and sit-ups, the new tests demand a greater mix of stamina, muscular endurance and strength.


    Sgt Maj Paton added: “I've got plenty of combat experience, but I've never done a sit-up on the battlefield.”

    Helping create the new system, the university’s Human Physiology Team spent months analysing the different challenges created in modern soldiering combat situations. They also took account of changes in scientific knowledge about the human body.

    These challenges were adapted to actual physical tasks and then submitted to military judgement panels to be refined.

    Lieutenant Colonel Anne Fieldhouse from the Royal Army Medical Corps, welcomed the gender-neutral nature of the tests.

    “We are moving with society,” she said, adding that the new tests need to “fit with the modern approach,” to sports science. In the modern Army, female soldiers are increasingly engaging with the enemy in combat situations.

    The old tests comprised of two annual requirements. Firstly, a soldier would have to do as many sit-ups and press-ups as possible in two minutes. Then, they would have to run a mile and a half as fast as they could. The second test was an 8-mile march carrying 25kgs in under two hours.


    Sgt Maj Paton said that while the old tests were not bad, modern combat has changed in recent decades and the exams need to reflect that shift.


    “Combat is gritty, hard and tough and we must prepare our people for it,” he said. “The new test is not harder, just different. It will stretch people. It’s demanding, but certainly achievable.”

    The new test starts with a 4km march in full kit, followed by a shorter run and crawl, to simulate fighting through an enemy position. Soldiers then have to drag and lift heavy weights as if casualties have been taken in an attack and need to be moved quickly. Finally, troops have to repeatedly lift and carry weights as if they were building a defensive position. The test takes about three hours to complete.


    Soldiers are expected to be exhausted at the end of the session. This cumulative fatigue element is designed to be more representative of modern combat.

    The risks of musculoskeletal injury, something research has shown women are more likley to suffer, has been factored into the new exams.

    The armies of Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the US have used similar methodologies. However, the British Army will be the first to use such a scientific approach not only for serving soldiers, but eventually also as part of recruitment tests.

    It is possible to join Army at the age of 16 to begin training, but only those over 18 are allowed to engage with the enemy. Meanwhile, new recruits can be aged 33 for soldiers and 29 for officers. Normal length of service is 22 years, which can be extended to 27 years for special circumstances. While officers are expected to retire at 55, very senior Servicemen are allowed to continue.'

    No press ups on it.
     
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  6. KenDoll

    KenDoll New Member

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    It may be a good test to add into along side the gym tests and running tests, but not instead of. It sounds like another way of getting women into certain areas of the armed forces to me.

    I'd be very concerned if this got implemented in Royal Marine selection.
     
  7. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    To me it makes absolute sense to have fitness assessments based around the actual physical demands of the job.

    So far as I'm aware, happy to be corrected, but the fitness tests are about meeting then affirming the continued ability to do the job once you've completed training. As the RSM on the telly said today, "we don't do three mile runs in trainers on the battlefield".

    Time will tell but if it reduces injuries in training and is more vocationally based, then it looks promising.
     
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  8. Illustrious

    Illustrious Royal Marines Commando - Moderator

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    I look forward to reading about the Royal Navy's new fitness standards then... One sit up to simulate waking up and two 100m waddles separated by a single floor staircase climb to simulate the run to and from the galley. :D:D
     
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  9. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Just because we elect to go to war in an air conditioned environment with duty free booze and cigarettes, feather pillows and sprung mattresses to sleep upon, satellite telly, chef-prepared meals, hot showers and a sweet shop: The fact we shoot supersonic missiles at over the horizon targets with pinpoint accuracy, whilst drinking Pimms and Lemo doesn't mean we have it easy in the Navy.

    No hang-on....it does. :)
     
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  10. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    The army should Do a BFT in boots then. It’s a basic fitness test. Basics. Then you utilise section battle drills and troop training for combat fitness.

    What an absolute shambles. Who let the bloody good idea fairy out again?! See my bold.

    3 hours to do a BASIC annual fitness test?! What a load of over hyped, over complicated and over though load of pish.
    Standard officer rubbish. Take something simple, over complicate it, take a payrise for it then go and #%^* something else up that doesn’t need changing.
     
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  11. threadpigs

    threadpigs Royal Marines Commando

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    It all reeks to me.
     
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  12. The Creature of the Night

    The Creature of the Night Member

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    I agree with your bolds.
    Terrible and a slippery road. What next? Axe fitness tests entirely to allow anyone to join?
     
  13. The Creature of the Night

    The Creature of the Night Member

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    I was looking at the Army Reserves before I made a firm decision for the RMR

    All I can say is, is that I am glad I chose the RMR above any army regiment and/or unit.
     
  14. Moonduster

    Moonduster Member

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    If it ain’t broke don’t fix it!

    Perhaps the army will benefit from this but I doubt the RM would.
     
  15. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    So far as I'm aware there are no plans to change the RM fitness tests on grounds of gender, however the word is that RM annual fitness tests are changing to become vocationally orientated from next year, as trained ranks will already be aware. One of the new tests includes a 30 foot rope climb, I understand.

    To me, the proposed RM changes look physically more demanding rather than easier and reflect the fact that after Recruit Training, the level achieved to successfully complete the Commando Tests will naturally reduce over time.

    It will be interesting to hear what trained ranks think of the new fitness tests and indeed whether more individuals within the Corps will need to retake under the newer scheme compared to the old.

    The danger, as I think most would agree - is a reduction in fitness standards to accommodate political objectives over operational capability or indeed blaming the wrong people based on unproven assumptions.
     
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  16. Wings

    Wings Parachute Regiment

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    It makes perfect sense some push ups sit ups and a 1.5 mile run isnt specific to the job. You can get men smashing 8.40 pfas but we never do our job in pt kit.

    Doing a short tab and a crawl and a drag/casevac is a lot more specific i dont think it caters to women at all

    But 3 hours to do it i mean cmon.
    Just give them a cft 8 miles 2 hours if you doing army career centre the 1.5 mile should stay
     
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  17. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Do we have a list of the previous elements of the Army annual fitness tests to compare with the new tests?
     
  18. dodgyknees

    dodgyknees Member

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    The PFA has three elements. Press-ups (two minutes as many as you can and not to beep); sit-ups (same rules as press-ups) and 1.5 mile run. Standards to achieve are age, gender and role dependent. This should be done twice per year.

    The idea being was that you can do the test pretty much anywhere with minimum equipment.

    There are other fitness tests which are role dependent - the most common of which is the 8 mile CFT which has to be completed in 2 hours carrying rifle and weight (again, weight dependent on role).
     
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  19. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    It’s not supposed to be “specific to the job” it’s supposed to be a basic test of a base level of fitness.

    And especially the recruiting aspect. You can’t expect lads to crack that without a gauge of the level of fitness.

    If you want to judge people’s “battle fitness” then you conduct battle phys. Or an exercise or section battle drills.

    Bootnecks do the BFT in boots and combats, the army bottled it and went with phys kit.
    Sit-ups are used to help strengthen for rope climbs, which the army don’t do anymore.

    Basically this test is the army realising they screwed it up and trying to claw it back, but in an over complicated, over thought, admin heavy waste of time. With far too many officers discussing it over caviar.


    The admin alone will be hectic. It’s 3 hours to complete. With the military aspect and the limited kit and turn around that’s going to stretch far beyond 3 hours.

    A BFT takes long enough as it is.
     
  20. The Creature of the Night

    The Creature of the Night Member

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    I think this is possibly why the R.M appeals to young lads possibly over and above the Army and/or RAF:
    Themstandsrds are hard, and they are maintained to ensure Marines can fight in any climate with impunity. That’s how I see it.