Night Nav

larmr

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I have just brought an ordinance survey map that includes Woodbury common. I was just wondering if anyone is able to provide me with Eastings and Northings of the area where nav is conducted whilst in training. This is so that I can get to learn a bit about the area before conducting nav there.

Any information welcome!
 

stumpylegs

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It’s mainly from uppems plantation-Woodbury castle and diamond cops, there’s a track you can follow in a big loop on Marshall star, you learn the tracks on quickcover and wont need a map to know where you are
 

mactavish80

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Might sound stupid, but I was wondering if anyone had any advice or tips for doing night nav, or know where I can get a guide or anything? Need to get my skills up for a course I'm doing
 

larmr

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Might sound stupid, but I was wondering if anyone had any advice or tips for doing night nav, or know where I can get a guide or anything? Need to get my skills up for a course I'm doing
13 useful videos here
 

Caversham

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GR SY 03212 87332 This is the Woodbury Castle area and anything south of there is where you'll train.

As for night nav, make sure you're competent in reading a map and compass during daylight. Once you've achieved that, transfer the skills to the night time. Counting paces becomes all the more important at night, so practice those.

If you really want to up your game, then take up orienteering. Kills two birds with one stone, i.e. keeps you fit and your map reading skills will improve beyond belief.

Alan
 

Rover

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As for night nav, make sure you're competent in reading a map and compass during daylight. Once you've achieved that, transfer the skills to the night time. Counting paces becomes all the more important at night, so practice those.
Alan



I would also add that you should also build up a mental picture of the ground you will be moving over. To have the ability and confidence to move at night without recourse to a map and compass is a skill that could serve you well. Not to mention impress those you work with.;)

Be one with the night, bearing in mind that the ‘Dark Side’ operates very happily in such circumstances. :cool:
 

Mr S

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The first bit of advice I'd give is practice, practice, practice. This means getting out on the ground and using all the techniques. I would actually avoid Woodbury Common, unless this is on your doorstep, as it may make you complacent with that area, plus it won't be the only area that you operate in. You want to try as many different types of terrain as possible.

I'm just back from instructing on a WMF / Winter Skills course in the Cairngorms for five days. In addition to the usual pacing, timing, bearings, altitude and developing your map memory, one of the things I get my students to do is to feel what the ground is doing as you move along, eg up, down, steep, flat etc. This includes small dips and rises - normally indicative of a small stream. Snow covers streams so you can't see them, and in a whiteout you'll see even less - a bit like a white dark, if that makes sense, and extremely disorientating. You can actually get very good at this, with practice, and it becomes your eyes, in effect. Using all available clues, just makes life so much easier.

Many years ago, on a call out, we got dropped off by a snowcat in the middle of nowhere, in the middle of a winter night to make our way to a bothy, a number of hours away, for a first light search. I looked at the map maybe twice in that time, the rest was done from map memory and ticking off features in my head as we passed them. It was deep snow as well, so no path to follow.
 

Chelonian

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Really sound advice in the posts above. For anyone that doesn't have easy access to 'wilderness' areas, get a 1:50,000 Ordnance Survey map of your local area and use it to visualise (translate) what is on the map to what you see on the ground.
If you're a skinflint, like what I am, scratch around charity shops and buy one for 50p.
Even if you live in a relatively flat, urban environment you will definitely benefit from being familiar with OS conventional symbols, etc. And the subtlety of relatively flat terrain on a map should not be disregarded in terms of training value.
 

Caversham

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Looking at all the above posts the big message that leaps out is to get out on the ground and familiarise yourselves with a map and the ground in front of you.

I will put my head on the block and say that all of us will have got lost at some point in our lives, but we would have learnt from it and the more experience you gain from being out there in all weathers, the more confident you will become as you progress.

Countless times over the years, myself and others have suggested that guys who have passed PRMC should, apart from keeping their fitness up, get a grip on ironing and learning the basics of map reading. Learning these two elements will save you hours of grief!

Alan
 

Mr S

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I will put my head on the block and say that all of us will have got lost at some point in our lives, but we would have learnt from it and the more experience you gain from being out there in all weathers, the more confident you will become as you progress.

Couldn't agree more, the art of navigation isn't necessarily just the skills of getting from A to B, but more importantly the ability to relocate yourself and get yourself out the poo when you become "geographically challenged" (I've never been lost ;), well, I'm not going to admit to it)

Countless times over the years, myself and others have suggested that guys who have passed PRMC should, apart from keeping their fitness up, get a grip on ironing and learning the basics of map reading. Learning these two elements will save you hours of grief!

I took my son out to featureless moorland as part of his nav training, it helped him immensely, opened his eyes to small features on the ground that most people miss. He had no problems with nav in RT.
 

Chelonian

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(I've never been lost ;), well, I'm not going to admit to it)

I've never been lost either. A story I'll stick to, even if I often can't find my own socks. :) Oh, the shame! Back in the day some patrols were politely escorted back across a border by the Garda Síochána after becoming 'temporarily unfamilar with location'. Which is a euphemism for not having a clue where one is.

The understanding in the 1970s was that such transgressions (common occurrences because of the porous border) were settled by the gift of a crate of Whiskey (Irish, naturally) or Port to the Garda.
It has always struck me as being a civilised way to settle border disputes.
 

Caversham

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I've never been lost either. A story I'll stick to, even if I often can't find my own socks. :) Oh, the shame! Back in the day some patrols were politely escorted back across a border by the Garda Síochána after becoming 'temporarily unfamilar with location'. Which is a euphemism for not having a clue where one is.

The understanding in the 1970s was that such transgressions (common occurrences because of the porous border) were settled by the gift of a crate of Whiskey (Irish, naturally) or Port to the Garda.
It has always struck me as being a civilised way to settle border disputes.
Remember that well! Although my two tours in NI were in Belfast I was not put in that position! Thankfully!

Alan
 
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larmr

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It’s mainly from uppems plantation-Woodbury castle and diamond cops, there’s a track you can follow in a big loop on Marshall star, you learn the tracks on quickcover and wont need a map to know where you are
Thanks for that, I have found all those places apart from diamond cops. Is it on the map as diamond cops?

Thanks again,
 

Chelonian

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...I have found all those places apart from diamond cops. Is it on the map as diamond cops?

I'd search the map for a copse (a small block of woodland) shaped like a diamond. :)

@Caversham might be able to help you out here.
 

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