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Numb/tingling foot

Discussion in 'Common Training Injuries' started by CAA98, Jan 17, 2020.

  1. CAA98

    CAA98 New Member

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    Im wondering if anyone else has had this problem? It's only just started to occur during my last few runs normally around the 2 mile mark, my lower leg becomes really tense/tight calf muscle and then my foot gradually becomes numb there isn't any pain more just discomfort and annouying.
     
  2. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    I'm certainly not qualified to diagnose anything but try this stretch and see if it helps:

    Place ball of foot on a stair tread. Steady yourself by holding a hand rail. Lower your heel and body weight gently and feel the stretch in your calf. Don't bounce. Hold the stretch for about thirty seconds. Repeat five times. Do several sets daily.

    Hopefully others better qualified than I will chip in. Best of luck.
     
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  3. StrSam

    StrSam Well-Known Member

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    I used to get numb toes, and still do sometimes on longer runs. Just your body not used to the movement and repetition that's all. Stretch your calf loads throughout the day and massage it with a tennis ball after a run.
     
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  4. CAA98

    CAA98 New Member

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    Ok cheers both for the tips, I'll give them a try.
     
  5. Trooper149

    Trooper149 Valuable Contributor

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    Hey dude, hard to assess as I can't see you physically and how your body is operating while running, but my guess is that your calf muscles (soleus, gastrocnemius and some other latin sounding muscles) are tight when resting.

    When you run, the tightness increases. This will have the effect of putting pressure on the nerve pathways that run through the muscles creating that tingling sensation (that tingling is due to poor relaying of the messages from the sensors to the brain). It will also cause slight constriction of bloodflow leading to localized muscular breakdown (atrophy) and weakness. This causes a negative loop because weakness then causes the muscle to work harder to maintain muscular tension - leading to further increase in tightness, and so it repeats.

    With this said, bottom line, much like previous suggestions: you NEED to stretch and relax your calves.

    Do the following method every 2nd day (or everyday if you want):
    • 2 sets of 15 rolls using a rumble roller (to penetrate the muscle, release knots and breakup micro scar tissue)
    • then 2 sets of 15 rolls using a smooth roller (to relax the muscle and smooth out the muscle fibres) alternate between these 2, 1 set of rumble rolls, then 1 set of smooth rolls, repeat.

    • 3 static stretch holds lasting for 15 to 20 seconds (also do this AFTER any workout)
    • 3 sets of 15 bodyweight calf raises on a ledge (like a set of stairs) do this BEFORE any workout aswell
    I'd say you would have more systemic issues if you don't notice any change after a week. Best get a postural assessment by a private physio, chiropractor or osteopath in that case. Be worth the money.
     
  6. sharpe

    sharpe Valuable Contributor

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    @Trooper149 just an observation and I’m sure you’re massively qualified but maybe post your credentials ahead of offering advice like that. People really take on board advice on this platform.
     
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  7. physiomum

    physiomum Valuable Contributor

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    Hi @CAA98
    I think I would seek a reputable medical opinion (private if you don’t want it on your record). The above advice is definitely worth a try in the meantime but your symptoms could be due to spinal dysfunction, nerve root irritation or compartment syndrome. These problems definitely need assessing and addressing or ruling out before recruit training. I wish you all the best with sorting this out.
     
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  8. Trooper149

    Trooper149 Valuable Contributor

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    @sharpe ordinarily I would, but I am aware that more and more "professionals" use forums as a means to collect prospective clients. I'm simply applying to the RM and wish to help others in the same process. Not promote myself. The above advice, while it is the stuff I would use for my own clients, in this case, is merely a helpful opinion and not a professional opinion.

    This said, I am a Personal Trainer (but I qualified to work in one of the top personal training gyms in the country) prior to beginning the application process.
     
  9. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    A general note about 'advice'. Regardless of one's qualifications and experience nobody here can accurately diagnose even supposedly 'obvious' conditions.

    Anecdotal comments, observations and suggestions are fine but the sensible action is to have a niggle professionally assessed as recommended by @physiomum
     
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