Officer life

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grp12345

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Hi,

I'm not sure if this has been covered before, but what free time does an officer have to pursue hobbies E.g sport etc?

Thanks,
G.
 

SnakeEyes

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I’ve been wondering a similar thing regarding sport.

I know sport is a big thing in the military so let’s say you have a Captain and a Mne playing against eachother in a rugby match, things get a bit heated and then the Mne tries to fill in the Captain? Do they sort of ‘forget’ (for lack of a better word) rank when playing sports?
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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I’ve been wondering a similar thing regarding sport.

I know sport is a big thing in the military so let’s say you have a Captain and a Mne playing against eachother in a rugby match, things get a bit heated and then the Mne tries to fill in the Captain? Do they sort of ‘forget’ (for lack of a better word) rank when playing sports?
No rank ashore. No rank on the playing field.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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In my experience the Corps manages the "rank" thing better than many other arms of the services, particularly when ashore or on the polo field.

The "class" thing certainly exists in the imagination of many, but nowadays regional accents are found in the highest echelons - I know of a Brigadier with a broad scouse accent and my own boss, a Commodore, is a proud Yorkshireman with the accent to match. If we are both wearing civilian clothes at a civic event, I'm the 'posh' one, being offered the caviar. :D
 

TheRents

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Physical fitness is a huge part of life in the Corps. Not only are there many opportunities for sport at work including 2 weeks a year AT, most of the guys spend a lot of their free time kayaking, climbing, skiing (downhill and langlauf), sailing and team sports. NOT POLO.

I know there always the running joke about caviar munching officers but this is not the reality that I know. Don't be put off!
I drive a citroen van, my wife is a nurse. Guys who passed out with my son came from all walks of life. Some were earning more as a YO than both their parents combined income. Yes some guys had gone to 'top' schools but one of them was because his mother worked there. Some guys had parents who were in the forces, a couple in the Corps. The officer running his POC had been a farm worker, his first OC had grown up in one of the most deprived inner city locations in the UK.

Yes they have parties in the mess, when you will be expected to dress up, but so do the NCO's. Yes they have loads of weird traditions that you have to learn, but these once learnt give the feeling of belonging and are also a great leveller. It matters not whether you went to Westminster or Wandsworth Comp, when you first arrive nobody knows the rules and you all learn together.

I have been fortunate enough to be invited to a couple of proper regimental events at CTC. I have never been made to feel second best and even spent a great evening chatting to someone who turned out to be a (just) retired RM Brigadier and the most senior officer present- how was I to know.

I suppose there will always be a divide between officers and other ranks, but in The Corps it is not a class divide. Remember anyone is free to apply for YO training and your upbringing is not a barrier to joining.

That's it. I said my piece!
 

sharpe

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Physical fitness is a huge part of life in the Corps. Not only are there many opportunities for sport at work including 2 weeks a year AT, most of the guys spend a lot of their free time kayaking, climbing, skiing (downhill and langlauf), sailing and team sports. NOT POLO.

I know there always the running joke about caviar munching officers but this is not the reality that I know. Don't be put off!
I drive a citroen van, my wife is a nurse. Guys who passed out with my son came from all walks of life. Some were earning more as a YO than both their parents combined income. Yes some guys had gone to 'top' schools but one of them was because his mother worked there. Some guys had parents who were in the forces, a couple in the Corps. The officer running his POC had been a farm worker, his first OC had grown up in one of the most deprived inner city locations in the UK.

Yes they have parties in the mess, when you will be expected to dress up, but so do the NCO's. Yes they have loads of weird traditions that you have to learn, but these once learnt give the feeling of belonging and are also a great leveller. It matters not whether you went to Westminster or Wandsworth Comp, when you first arrive nobody knows the rules and you all learn together.

I have been fortunate enough to be invited to a couple of proper regimental events at CTC. I have never been made to feel second best and even spent a great evening chatting to someone who turned out to be a (just) retired RM Brigadier and the most senior officer present- how was I to know.

I suppose there will always be a divide between officers and other ranks, but in The Corps it is not a class divide. Remember anyone is free to apply for YO training and your upbringing is not a barrier to joining.

That's it. I said my piece!
Close the thread, nothing more to be said. Fantastic insight
 
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