Officer queries

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by JaFrJh, Aug 11, 2017.

  1. JaFrJh

    JaFrJh New Member

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    Afternoon lads, me again. Correct me if I'm wrong but is the officers training a competitive selection type thing? Meaning only a certain number can pass out. Was just wondering wether I could do anything in the 2 years that I'm doing my A-levels to make myself a better candidate.
     
  2. GreyTintin

    GreyTintin New Member

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    Hello buddy - as far as I've seen mate once you are in training they are expecting you to pass. I've gone through the application process myself and I've never seen any mention of anyone being chopped once down at Lympestone (unless they're gopping ofc) but not down to number limitations.

    As far as making yourself better mate - RMYO applications are competitive to say the least buddy. Just keep nailing different types of leadership and work out your weaknesses - even if just to say you know what they are when you get to your POC and AIB ;) Maybe another language, different experiences etc...
     
  3. JaFrJh

    JaFrJh New Member

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    Cheers buddy, so what your saying is that once your in training it's pass or fail but the applications are competitive?
     
  4. Quantumblade

    Quantumblade Member

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    To reiterate GreyTintin's words, other than the standard reasons to leave training (incompetency, medical discharge, voluntary withdrawal etc etc) there aren't outside limitations to making it through YO training. Atleast none that I've been made aware of.
    The application process in order to be accepted INTO YO training however is very much competitive and ultimately constrained by numbers. Each year roughly 50 spots are available, despite the hundreds of applicants. To give you an idea, normally 80-100 applicants pass the entire application process but only a certain number of those can be accepted in YO training. Bit of a ball ache for those who came so far only to turned away due to a numbers game.

    As for what will help you in the game, anything you can do to stand you out as an individual is huge. Ran a marathon? Speak two languages? Volunteered raising camels in Egypt? Obviously I jest but you get the point, any leadership or team-work experience you can get your hands on will pay dividends. Things that show your determination, aptitude or initiative go a long way when you're interviewing for SIFT or AIB. Fitness is also incredibly important, you'll need a strong showing to get through POC.
     
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  5. JaFrJh

    JaFrJh New Member

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    So what tyoe of teamwork stuff should I be looking at?

    I was also told by an SBS bloke that the university degree is pretty much essential at the application stage because of how strong the other candidates are, would you agree?
     
  6. Chelonian

    Chelonian Well-Known Member

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    You mentioned before that you've just completed your GCSEs. Maybe consider extending your general range of experience. Perhaps a part-time job compatible with your college studies? It may sound a bit tame but even that will expose you to life beyond education. This is also a good foundation for getting a grip on teamwork.

    When thinking about teamwork experiences don't just opt for the obvious, such as sports teams. I hate the phrase but 'think outside of the box'. Opportunities for teamwork often lead to opportunities to learn and demonstrate leadership skills.

    A few years back an article in The Globe & Laurel magazine stated that university graduates were statistically more likely to get a good pass at AIB not because of the degree itself but because of the three years of extra life experience they had over non-grads. As before, 'think outside of the box'; there are a vast number of experiences available to you which could potentially benefit your career aspirations.
    I won't list them because that would rather defeat the object of doing it for yourself. I'm not being patronising here; simply encouraging you to take a small step away from the spoon-fed environment we were all subjected to while in full-time education.

    By the way, the previously mentioned G & L magazine is the journal of the Royal Marines and contains much contemporary information about the Corps' activity. Publishes six times annually it is available by subscription. Or you might be able to cadge at least one free copy from an AFCO.
     
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  7. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    I'd fully endorse the advice above, some really valid points.

    I think the danger of looking at stats and seeing 85% of RM Officers having degrees automatically leads to assumptions. In actual fact, as pointed out above it's an age/maturity/life experience thing rather than the actual degree.

    Degrees are expensive, make no mistake. There are good degrees and useless degrees but the degree itself is not relevant to selection, pay or promotion in the Royal Marines. It does however point to the academic and intellectual standard of the individual making selection.

    What does that mean? If you are joining without a degree, you should have the same academic intellectual capacity to have successfully gained a credible degree and the maturity and the life experience that we would expect of a post graduate, such as independent living, leadership experience, teamwork and management potential, etc.

    Rest assured there are 18 year olds infinitely more capable and with more potential as RM Officers than 25 year old postgrads, but they are very much in the minority.
     
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  8. JaFrJh

    JaFrJh New Member

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    So although it's not essential to selection a degree is helpful in showing your intellectual ability and life experience as well as maturity. What other things could contribute in those years that others would be at uni?
     
  9. Chelonian

    Chelonian Well-Known Member

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    A handful of ideas below. Others might add their own suggestions:

    1. Consider taking every opportunity to broaden life experience.
    2. Stepping outside of one's comfort zone.
    3. Objectively assessing one's perceived weaknesses and addressing them.
    4. Travel and immersion in other cultures can broaden one's horizons. That doesn't mean paying to go on a self-indulgent student 'gap year' holiday to, say, Peru where one supposedly helps to build an orphanage that the local people don't need. :)
    5. Make mistakes—obviously not ones that involve a brush with the law—and learn from them.
     
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  10. JaFrJh

    JaFrJh New Member

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    Thanks buddy I will have a think then give it a go
     

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