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OMAN.

Discussion in 'Royal Marines History and Knowledge' started by Rover, Jan 11, 2020.

  1. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    An area well known to many former and serving Royal Marines.


    Sultan Qaboos of Oman, Arab world's longest-serving ruler, dies aged 79
    • 25 minutes ago.
    Sultan Qaboos bin Said Al Said of Oman, the Arab world's longest-serving ruler, has died aged 79.

    The sultan deposed his father in a bloodless coup with British support in 1970 and set Oman on a path to development, using its oil wealth.

    Widely regarded as popular, he was also an absolute monarch and any dissenting voices were silenced.

    No cause of death has been confirmed. His cousin Haitham bin Tariq Al Said has sworn in as his successor.

    The former culture and heritage minister took the oath of office on Saturday after a meeting of the Royal Family Council, the government said.


    The sultan is the paramount decision-maker in Oman. He also holds the positions of prime minister, supreme commander of the armed forces, minister of defence, minister of finance and minister of foreign affairs.

    Last month Sultan Qaboos - who had no heir or designated successor - spent a week in Belgium for medical treatment, and there were reports he was suffering from cancer.

    "With great sorrow and deep sadness... the royal court mourns His Majesty Sultan Qaboos bin Said, who passed away on Friday," a court statement said earlier, announcing three days of national mourning.

    Images showed a crowed of men gathered outside the Sultan Qaboos Grand Mosque in the capital, Muscat, where the casket had been taken and prayers were being held.

    Neutral policy
    For almost five decades, Sultan Qaboos completely dominated the political life of Oman, which is home to 4.6 million people, of whom about 43% are expatriates.

    At the age of 29 he overthrew his father, Said bin Taimur, a reclusive and ultra-conservative ruler who banned a range of things, including listening to the radio or wearing sunglasses, and decided who could get married, be educated or leave the country.

    Sultan Qaboos immediately declared that he intended to establish a modern government and use oil money to develop a country where at the time there were only 10km (six miles) of paved roads and three schools.

    In the first few years of his rule, he suppressed with the help of British special forces an insurgency in the southern province of Dhofar by tribesmen backed by the Marxist People's Democratic Republic of Yemen.

    Described as charismatic and visionary, he pursued a neutral path in foreign affairs and was able to facilitate secret talks between the United States and Iran in 2013 that led to a landmark nuclear deal two years later.
     
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  2. dodgyknees

    dodgyknees Guest

    Top man and a real force for good in a very difficult part of the world. I hope his successor will continue to follow the moderate path.
     
  3. Corona

    Corona Valuable Contributor

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    Would the Battle of Mirbat be one of the things from this? I'd never heard of iti until now, certainly an amazing read.
     
  4. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Yes.
     
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  5. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    During the Dhofar Campaign of the 1970’s many Royal Marine Officers and SNCO’s were seconded to the Sultans Forces. The Officers tended to serve in Dhofar commanding Oman troops fighting against the ‘Ado o’, (enemy). Many awarded gallantry medals for actions in Dhofar. The SNCO’s training those Omani forces in the north prior to those units being deployed south to Dhofar.

    Both Officers and SNCO’s also being awarded the Victory Medal when the war official ended in 1976.

    There was also the British Army Training Team (BATT). A mixture of Engineers, Signallers, Gunners, Medics members of the RAF not to mention members of the Special Forces.

    Members of the BATT were not entitled to any Omani awards as they were not seconded but part of the deployed forces from the UK. As such they were awarded the clasp Dhofar to be worn with the GSM.

    Nine Royal Marines are entitled to wear the Dhofar clasp.

    A good book covering that period....

    In The Service of the Sultan, by Ian Gardiner. A seconded Royal Marines Officer.


    ADOO.

    The Adoo, Arabic for enemy, were both well equipped and trained. The majority being trained directly by the Russians or the Chinese with the senior members having attended military establishments in Moscow or Peking. Members of the Soviet/ East German military also based in the Yemen as ‘advisers’ both to the Yemen government and those anti Oman forces operating in Dhofar. Intelligence also reported ‘Europeans’ actively seen with the Adoo in Dhofar.

    The Adoo were armed with Soviet weapons as per a standard battalion. Everything from pistols to mortars upwards to 122mm Katyusha Single Rocket Launchers and SAM7 Ground to Air Missiles. They were also supported from across the Yemen border at Hauf by 130mm and 122mm heavy artillery.

    The two things the Adoo lacked being a Navy and an Air Force.

    FIRQAT.

    The Firqat were surrendered enemy personal, SEP’s, who now served with the Sultans forces. They served in their own tribal areas alongside SF detachments of the BATT. They tended to be a law unto themselves when it came to deciding about going on patrol. Then again you could not fault them on local knowledge. Recovering Adoo arms caches was also a financial incentive. Tended to work well with us.

    Christmas 1975.jpeg
    Ground between the coast and the Jebal.JPG
    Ground between the coast and the Jebbal.
    VIP visit Dhalkut.Captured Shpagina..JPG
    VIP visit Dhalkut


    This was one of the 'little wars' in which British
    servicemen have been engaged for centuries - most of
    them, as this was, near the shores of the Indian
    Ocean - and it was a model of its kind....Only those
    who have been to Dhofar can fully appreciate the
    severity of the conditions in which the polyglot
    force fought and flew; at times extreme heat; at
    others cold, wet, permanent cloud; and rugged
    terrain, the equal of which it would be hard to find
    anywhere....Those who fought there, including those
    who were wounded or died, did not fight in vain.

    Michael Carver. Field Marshal
     
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  6. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Vintage DShK? :)
     
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  7. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Vintage in that first in action in 1939!:)
     
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  8. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    Further for your viewing......

    Weapons cache..JPG
    Captured weapons.
     
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  9. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    One for those interested in medals.

    GSM 4 CLASP 002.JPG

    A rare one.
     
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