Opinion on post-surgery training plan.

HoldFoldEm

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Hello lads,

If anyone with a bit of experience in physio/sports science would be able to chip in, it would be greatly appreciated.

*text deleted* I will also be submitting the final plan to the orthopedic surgeon who will be the one with the final say if it's fine or not, but at least until then I can get a better idea of where to adjust and what not.

I'm currently 20 days away from removing the 'special shoes' needed post-bunion surgery (Bilateral - both feet) and thus will be able to walk with normal shoes and hopefully start slow-running slightly after.

Currently the plan is -

Given I've just spent the last two months imitating a corpse (except the required training and chores of course), I'll start off with mobility and flexibility whilst re-engaging the whole body, I also previously suffered from Patellofemoral Tendinitis in my left knee, been feeling it lately again probably due to weakened calf and tight overall lower-body so want to make sure that goes away.

Thus I'll start off with workouts consisting of slow-running + circuits that will hit most areas.

Slow-running -

Once doctor confirms I can indeed start running, I'll be using a track to start off with 1 milers, always adding a bit more every few days, weeks, depending on level of discomfort.

To complement this I'll also be doing rucks, start off small as well with just a few kilometres such as 3-5, and progress accordingly, target pre-application is 40KM rucks so long way to go.

Example exercises to include in circuit -

Upper Body:

Push-ups, Pull-Ups, Turkish-Get Ups, Farmer/Suitcase walks, Ball Slams, Punching Bag drills, Reverse push-ups (Laying down on the floor and pulling yourself up on a smith-machine hands-to-chest.

Core/Lower-Body -

Sit-ups, Russian twists, Squats, Lunges, Yoga Ball hamstring curls, Walking with resistance bands, Calf exercises (can't think of the names right now hahah)

Once I've gotten the whole-body back up to scratch (by scratch I mean a basic level of fitness), I'll start including some core-lifts at a level which does not prejudice endurance and/or increase the risk of injury.

That's pretty much it for the start, some may say that it doesn't look like much but for those who don't know, bunion surgery is literally a removal of an extra piece of bone deposit and the breaking/re-adjusting of the big toe, so it's quite a tedious affair and I'd rather be the proverbial tortoise if it means I'll be able to get through ROP.

Any suggestions/tips or ideas anyone may have would be much appreciated and make sure to note!

Best,
R
 

HAWJ94

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Hello mate,

Big toe mobility is huge, so being able to adjust to that is vital - if your big toe doesn’t move well then the subsequent effect up the chain can be a bit of an issue.

Get used to moving your toes and feet. Shoes off, use your hands to move and flex and extend your toes. A bunion is pretty restrictive to movement, so your primary goal should be to get movement back into the joint. So starting passively is a good place to start.

Following that, barefoot walking, squatting, lunging will help. Get the foot engaging with the sensation of locomotion. Running without proper big toe mobility and especially post surgery won’t be the best thing for you.... if anything, go to a grass field and start running barefoot a bit. Even getting in the pool and kicking your legs will help.

Once you start to feel the movement and mobility come back then start pushing it a little more. Be aware of the shoes you’re wearing - bunions are typically caused by decreasing the space between the toes in tight shoes or from repetitive rubbing/contact with tight shoes. So make sure you’ve got something which allows you to spread your toes.

Just look after it, mobilise, strengthen and then progress it. Don’t push it too hard too fast but get stuck in with moving it.

Hope this helps!

Also - a reverse press up is called a supine/inverted row ;)

H
 

HoldFoldEm

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Hello mate,

Big toe mobility is huge, so being able to adjust to that is vital - if your big toe doesn’t move well then the subsequent effect up the chain can be a bit of an issue.

Get used to moving your toes and feet. Shoes off, use your hands to move and flex and extend your toes. A bunion is pretty restrictive to movement, so your primary goal should be to get movement back into the joint. So starting passively is a good place to start.

Following that, barefoot walking, squatting, lunging will help. Get the foot engaging with the sensation of locomotion. Running without proper big toe mobility and especially post surgery won’t be the best thing for you.... if anything, go to a grass field and start running barefoot a bit. Even getting in the pool and kicking your legs will help.

Once you start to feel the movement and mobility come back then start pushing it a little more. Be aware of the shoes you’re wearing - bunions are typically caused by decreasing the space between the toes in tight shoes or from repetitive rubbing/contact with tight shoes. So make sure you’ve got something which allows you to spread your toes.

Just look after it, mobilise, strengthen and then progress it. Don’t push it too hard too fast but get stuck in with moving it.

Hope this helps!

Also - a reverse press up is called a supine/inverted row ;)

H

Hello mate!

Thanks for taking the time to reply, it's much appreciated.

I currently have an exercise-regime pertaining to toe mobility actually, I do those toe wiggles for 1 set of 70 per toe, 3 times a day and currently do 15 minutes of walking with those special shoes, trying to make sure I walk straight and with a straight toe (force of habit the foot tends to walk at an angle). Prior to the workouts stated above, I will be doing a-lot more swimming and add barefoot walking as suggested before I get cracking on the more foot-intensive exercises, luckily Malta is riddled with beaches and also have a pool membership so will maximize their utility. ;)

Re the shoes, noted, will be buying ASICS as they seem to be generally wider than NIKE's or Adidas' shoes usually:)

Would you have any suggestions re Knee work until I can start progressing further? Lately I can feel the tendinitis flaring up again in the left knee, and I'd rather not cause an issue from trying to solve another hahaha.

Definitely appreciate your input! Can't wait to get back on track re training, days seem like weeks when you're bored and eager to get onto something.

Best,
R
 

HAWJ94

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Hello mate!

Thanks for taking the time to reply, it's much appreciated.

I currently have an exercise-regime pertaining to toe mobility actually, I do those toe wiggles for 1 set of 70 per toe, 3 times a day and currently do 15 minutes of walking with those special shoes, trying to make sure I walk straight and with a straight toe (force of habit the foot tends to walk at an angle). Prior to the workouts stated above, I will be doing a-lot more swimming and add barefoot walking as suggested before I get cracking on the more foot-intensive exercises, luckily Malta is riddled with beaches and also have a pool membership so will maximize their utility. ;)

Re the shoes, noted, will be buying ASICS as they seem to be generally wider than NIKE's or Adidas' shoes usually:)

Would you have any suggestions re Knee work until I can start progressing further? Lately I can feel the tendinitis flaring up again in the left knee, and I'd rather not cause an issue from trying to solve another hahaha.

Definitely appreciate your input! Can't wait to get back on track re training, days seem like weeks when you're bored and eager to get onto something.

Best,
R

Ah lovely! Some Maltese beach walking will sort you out big time then ha!

Vivobarefoot have probably the best shoes for foot health - although depends on your desired comfort levels..... the more comfortable the shoe, the less it’ll probably be good for you. Barefoot shoes are great though. I use my vivos all the time.

In regards to the knee and tendinitis, start with some isometric holds in different squat/lunge positions. Hold standing, half squat and full squat - same with lunges. Then progress to single leg work. Obviously just standing is pretty easy but I have no idea where you are at the moment - single leg standing could be a challenge! Hold each position for 30 seconds for a few sets.

Following that progress to eccentrics. So 10 second squats on the way down. Again, progress From two legs to a single leg. I wouldn't expect a full pistol squat straight away, so down with one leg and up with two, or use your hands for assistance.

Then progress to loading (weight) the knee through the movements above. Once you’re comfortable with that you can progress to lateral steps and jumps..... but Start with this first ha!

feel free to DM if you want any specific advice, more than happy to help!
 

HoldFoldEm

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Ah lovely! Some Maltese beach walking will sort you out big time then ha!

Vivobarefoot have probably the best shoes for foot health - although depends on your desired comfort levels..... the more comfortable the shoe, the less it’ll probably be good for you. Barefoot shoes are great though. I use my vivos all the time.

In regards to the knee and tendinitis, start with some isometric holds in different squat/lunge positions. Hold standing, half squat and full squat - same with lunges. Then progress to single leg work. Obviously just standing is pretty easy but I have no idea where you are at the moment - single leg standing could be a challenge! Hold each position for 30 seconds for a few sets.

Following that progress to eccentrics. So 10 second squats on the way down. Again, progress From two legs to a single leg. I wouldn't expect a full pistol squat straight away, so down with one leg and up with two, or use your hands for assistance.

Then progress to loading (weight) the knee through the movements above. Once you’re comfortable with that you can progress to lateral steps and jumps..... but Start with this first ha!

feel free to DM if you want any specific advice, more than happy to help!

Thank you so much! I'll make sure to introduce those to my exercise 'routine' (if it can even be called that right now hahah)

I also had a look at vivobarefoot and they look pretty neat, I'll have a go at the hiking and running shoes most likely, I do believe that when it comes to something long-term, you're better off paying for quality.

I had sort of resolved the tendinitis through stretching and strengthening my calf as I believe the issue stems from there (Knee compensating for calf/ankle due to bunion issue distorting general walking pattern, thus the muscle was stronger on one side of the leg rather than the other). For some reason it's reappearing again, perhaps the shoes given the pressure is directed on the heel for now, we'll see how it goes!

Thanks again :)


Best,
R
 

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