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Opinions on joining age!

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by OCH73, Mar 26, 2019.

  1. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    @Mole swings past from time-to-time.
     
  2. Pez1962

    Pez1962 Well-Known Member

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    I am a teacher but also the school's careers leader and advise young people on next steps after 16. Last year I had a young lad who only wanted to join RMs and although talking to him about waiting he went ahead and joined in October a few months after leaving. My son based at ctc saw him a few times and unfortunately reported to me he was huntered and has now left due to a medical issue. My point the medical issue may have still happened but his body was not ready in my opinion he was still growing physically and mentally he had no experience of living independently or life as a young person. If placed in the same position I would always say (and I did this for my own RM) wait at least a couple of years, live a little and gain some FE qualifications. But most importantly let your body finish developing. However when young people are on a mission sometimes there is no changing them and only they can find out. I am sure statistically some 16 year olds go through and passout but many do not.
     
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  3. physiomum

    physiomum Member

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    My son turned 17 the month before RT and all went pretty smoothly until week 5 . I thought he was very well prepared and would cope physically. Since then with a few set backs ie being ill, struggling to maintain fitness levels and standards it’s become apparent that his mental strength is not as resilient . Hopefully this will improve but we are really struggling to persuade him to stay in at the moment. I’m thinking that perhaps with a couple more years of life experience this may not have been such a problem who knows?
     
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  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    My thoughts are that many underestimate the mental as well as physical demands, regardless of age.

    Sometimes we just have to learn by our own mistakes, which is the benefit of youth. Conversely, there are plenty of 30-32 years-old recruits who will regret not having joined a decade earlier.
     
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  5. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Ex Pongo

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    Some under 18s absolutely thrive on military life. For many of them it is the first time they are subject to a true level of discipline. Which provides real structure to a young life.
     
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  6. Snafu

    Snafu Member

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    My lad told us aged 16 it was his goal but due to weight had to wait. Did 3 years at college on two different btec course and got a* passes in them all.
    Joined this year aged 19 and is a totally different body shape to when he was 16 which made me happier that he is joining stronger than if he had when 16. I know they all develop at different rates but if you have any influence I would encourage him to wait, develop physically and get some qualifications which could improve his RM career in the long run.
    Best of luck to him and you whatever he decides.
     
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  7. doggle

    doggle Active Member

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    I’d be concerned that he’d be leaving one establishment where he’d spent most of his life (school) to join another establishment with the potential for another long stint and then become institutionalised.
    As has been alluded to in previous comments, it’s so important that young people get out there and find their feet in the world, make their mistakes and learn from them, meet different people, go places....great prep for adulthood.
     
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  8. kirbymorgan17

    kirbymorgan17 New Member

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    i have read these posts,for me what is a fascinating topic and shows the diverse approach in how to encourage our children to follow their chosen path and to fulfill and achieve all that they want in life in the absolute knowledge that of what i have read here all posts have only the welfare and well being of the growing and development of any young person.my son was also adamant like others that he had only one intention and that was to join the armed forces this he done with my blessing and my signature he was 15 years and ten month of age some 7 years ago he remains serving.he had the determination at that age and the recruiting sergeant explained that at his age and stage of development that it would be in his best interests to attend a sport science course for a year whilst a member of the armed forces and a qualification on completion and then to join his regiment of choice this he did i can only say that this course was designed to not only to give him a bit of breathing space but most importantly it taught him a life long lesson in how to test your body to help to alleviate an injury off course we all have a different development timescale as can be witnessed by this post i have not fully matured at time of posting.
     
  9. ex killick

    ex killick Ex-Matelot

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    I joined at 16 and 3 months. Loved it. I think it was because I never knew any better or different, so I just got on with it. Passed out and deployed straight after my radar course. 6 months Far East! Winner.

    However, physical demands of commando training on a 16 year old, maybe a different kettle!
     
  10. Sengdroma

    Sengdroma New Member

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    Ok so my 16 year old had his face to face last week. Everyone thinks he is too young. That is not to say that they are not encouraging him to stick at it, but that he is going to be with guys 22 yrs plus normally and they will be out drinking etc and at 16 when he has time off he will be stuck. The AFCO etc want him to feel part of the team not feel only a bit of the team - that means going out with the lads, not being left at the barracks or preventing them from getting in somewhere because he is under age.

    On that note ... he is TMU due to weight, which we knew he would be, the AFCO pushed him to have an early medical as we needed to know if his past mental state could prevent him getting in. The downside we all knew he would be under weight.

    The doctor at the face to face and the AFCO told him to go to Duchy College (Cornwall) and do the MAPs course as this will get him experience and help him grow mentally and physically even more plus gain qualifications. They have told him to knuckle down and get his GCSEs out of the way and then as his medical is valid until March next year get some more weight on him and then go for it again then.

    The AFCO and doctor stated that is rare to see such youngsters now and that 22 - 28 was normal. They prefer the older recruits as they have stopped growing and their bones are more mature, and their bodies are within reason better able to handle the physical demands that will be placed on them when compared to a 16 year old.

    So my son's plan is keep up with the training, get his GCSEs done this May and June, start the Duchy course and keep his AFCO updated with his progress. The minute he hits above weight then the AFCO will get him back in to the face to face.

    In the mean time the AFCO has scheduled ours son's formal interview in for July.

    Long story short - I personally and others think that 16 is too young but are encouraging the knowledge and keen he is.
     
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  11. dodgyknees

    dodgyknees Active Member

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    Issue here is as much about physical as mental development. If he is yet to meet the minimum weight as well as being extremely young, I would agree with others that he may be better off waiting a bit until he fully develops (and can have a beer). I get the enthusiasm argument but there are some big lads at CTC, it would be sad to see him sidelined due to both age and size. His initial enthusiasm could rapidly evaporate as he fully gets to grip with the demands of the course. Trick will be to keep him interested while he waits a year or two.
     
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  12. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    In many ways your lad is fortunate to now have a goal to work towards. For anyone who is not a natural academic (that was me) education snaps into focus and becomes relevant whereas previously it was perhaps just a theoretical chore. He doesn't need qualifications to enlist but he will require them to progress through promotion.

    Aside from his phys and growing a bit he also has an opportunity to get a grip of basic map reading and dhobi. :) Both are skills that will be of major benefit when he starts RT. Getting stuck into activities that will challenge his 'comfort zone' and boost his confidence is another opportunity to consider.

    Keep us updated with how he progresses.
     
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  13. kirbymorgan17

    kirbymorgan17 New Member

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    i think your lad has taken on board all the advise he has heard regarding his development and progress and has considered the many views expressed on this subject.i know that when a youngster has decided as you have so plainly said that to achieve his goals in life he has chosen to go into the classroom.i do not know anything about drinking and having to fit in with the boys down the pub as a team bonding exercise. the age question as to the most appropriate age to begin the skeletal development and or the mental development is very individual.i have no idea about the the age range stated 22 to 28 to be the optimum.that would preclude a lot or a significant amount or discourage youngsters to what we all wont to see the fulfillment of a desire to join the british armed forces.i know that the advise from the british army has only the welfare and well being of any prospective youngster to be paramount.