Original Medical Standards for Entry - Reference only

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Ninja_Stoker

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Please note that the AFCO staff are not medically qualified and that the decision regarding medical suitability for enlistment is determined by selection medical staff.

The aim of this thread is to clarify the medical standards laid down to all applicants joining the Armed Forces. In general terms if an individual fails to meet the medical standard for a specific trade in one of the services, they will most likely do likewise in the equivalent trade in one of the other arms of the Services.

Despite individual experience expressed to the contrary, the medical standards for entry are different for those currently serving personnel who may develop a condition in service which precludes entry, but does not always stop them continuing to serve after they have joined.

Rather than enter into the semantics or fairness of the standards outlined below, those wishing to complain about it would be better off directing their complaint at the medical authorities who set the standard they get paid a lot more than me anyway. The following is an extract from guidance notes that are given to every applicant (which invariably remain unread!). Any spelling errors are mine, my apologies:

AFCO FORM 5

Revised Mar 07


APPLICATION FORM INFORMATION & GUIDANCE NOTES
MEDICAL

Fit to Serve. The Armed Forces require anyone who enters to be medically fit to serve world-wide.

New entrants to the Armed Forces undergo Intensive training which is physically demanding and mentally taxing, therefore the Service medical authorities have to be made aware of your medical history. Your application will be rejected if you fail to meet the minimum acceptable medical standard for entry. Your medical history is confidential and is not disclosed to those not authorised to hold this information.

The following initial medical examinations will take place for the:

(1) Royal Navy and Royal Air Force. It will take place locally as arranged by the Armed Forces Careers Office.

(2) Army. It will take place in an Army Development and Selection Centre. For that reason the Army additionally uses a detailed questionnaire to be completed by your Doctor as part of the eligibility process in order to help avoid unnecessary travel away from home.

(3) Reserve Forces. Under single service arrangements as notified by the recruiting personnel.
[*]Unsuitable conditions[/*].

The conditions in the table on below and overleaf make a person permanently unsuitable for entry into the Services.
Please also note:

(1) Height and weight Height should be within normal limits for the recruit age and weight should be in proportion to height (see also paragraph 1.8b).

(2) Visual standards: The minimum standards for both uncorrected and corrected visual acuity on recruitment are determined by single-Service authorities and are dependent upon the proposed employment and trade group. Spectacle or contact lens correction must not be greater than -7 dioptres or +8 dioptres in any meridian. Impaired colour perception (colour blindness) is not a bar to service but may limit career choices.

This table below and overleaf is not exhaustive and is for general guidance only. Many conditions that are compatible with civilian employment and sport may be considered incompatible with military service. If you have a medical condition that is not mentioned below, or you are unclear about the impact of your medical
history, you should seek further advice from the AFCO staff. Please note that the AFCO staff are not medically qualified and that the decision regarding medical suitability for enlistment is determined by selection medical staff.

Eye Disorders

Eye disease e.g. glaucoma, keratoconus, retinitis pigmentosa. Double vision.
Visual field defects. Corneal grafts or recurrent comeal ulcers. Cataract or cataract surgery. Detached retina. Vision only in one eye. Squint surgery in the previous 6 months. Laser eye surgery in the previous 12 months.

Ear Nose & Throat disorders

Ongoing ear, nose, throat or sinus disease. Deafness. Presence of grommets.
Current perforated ear drum. Certain surgical procedures.

Heart and Cardiovascular disorders

Heart disease. Certain congenital heart conditions e.g. repair of tetralogy of Fallot, coarctation of the aorta. Certain heart valve abnormalities. High blood pressure. Raynauds disease.

Respiratory disorders

Asthma, wheeze or asthma symptoms or treatment within the past 4 years. Lung
disease Including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis.
Active tuberculosis.

Abdominal and digestive disorders including diet

Ongoing abdominal, digestive or liver disease. Crohn's disease. Ulcerative colitis.
Loss of spleen (splenectomy). Chronic hepatitis. Untreated hernia. Requirement for specific dietary restriction.

Neurological disorders

Ongoing nervous system disease. Epilepsy or more than one Seizure/fit afterer
the age of 5 (although Benign Rolandic epilepsy is acceptable). Single sezure/fit
within the last 5 years. Multiple sclerosis. Complications following head injury.
Hydrocephalus (with or without shunt). Severe or recurrent headache (including
migraine).

Endocrine Disorders

Diabetes. Adrenal disorders. Pituitarv disorders. Certain thyroid diseases.
Abdominal and digestive disorders

Skin disorders

Chronic eczema or dermatitis. &ere psoriasis. Severe acne.

Male reproductive disorders

Current cancer of the testicle or prostate gland. Chronic pelvic pain.

Musculoskeletal disorders

Any abnormality that interferes with the ability to undertake military training.
Spinal abnormalities. Certain spinal operations. Recurrent back pain or sciatica.
Joint disease, pain or limitation of joint movement. Hypermobility (laxity)
of the joints, Bone or joint operations within the last 12 months. Anterior
cruciate ligament reconstruction (subject to slngle Service policy). Recurrent
joint dislocations. Severe deformity following fractures. Loss of a Iimb. Foot
abnormalities (e.g. club foot, hammer toe). Complete loss of either big toe.
Complete loss of either thumb. Arthritis and similar conditions.

Blood disorders

Certain blood diseases, such as G6PDD, sickle cell disease, congenital
spherocytosis, haemoglobinopathy, Any blood disorder or abnormality or blood clotting/bleed issues.

Infections

Human immunodeficiency virus (HN) / acquired immune deficiency syndrome
(AIDS). Carriers of hepatitis viruses.

Malignancy (cancer)

Most cancers are considered to place an applicant below the medical entry standard. Exceptions - some cancers in childhood or early adult life that have
been successfully treated and are regarded as cured.

Allergic disorders

Severe allergic reactions and/or anaphylaxis. A need to any adrenaline
injections (EPIPEN etc.). Nut and peanut allergy. Egg allergy. Latex allergy.
Vaccine allergy (including Tetanus allergy). Gluten ssensitivity (Coeliac disease).

Conditions resulting from exposure to extremes of temperature

Heat illness. Frostbite and non-freezing cold injury.

Psychiatric disorders

Ongoing psychiatric illness. Psychosis. Schizophrenia Obsessive-compulsive
disorder. Autism. Personality disorder. More than one episode of deliberate
self-harm of any type. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Alcohol, drug or
substance dependence. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) unless
free of symptoms and not requiring treatment for at least 3 years. Anorexia and
bulimia.

Kidney disorders

Ongoing kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease and kidney stones. Donation
of kidney in the past 6 months.

Other - Transplanted organs.

c. Temporary conditions. The following conditions Incur a temporary hold on the selection procedure and or entry/attestation until fully recovered, discharged from hospital follow-up and fit to undergo arduous training:

Waiting list for an operation

Temporary illness or injury

Your application may be rejected due to other medical reasons, which are subject to the discretion of Service Medical Authorities.

MINIMUM HEIGHT AND WEIGHTS

Royal Navy and Royal Marines. There is a minimum height requirement of 151.5cm. The Royal Marines also have a minimum weight requirement of 60kg.

Army. There is an overall minimum height requirement of 148cm except for driver trades when the minimum height is 158cm. This will be indicated when those specific jobs are discussed as an option along with other selection criteria.

RAF. There is no overall minimum height; however, certain trades have a minimum height requirement. This will be indicated when those specific jobs are discussed as an option along with other selection criteria

TATTOOS/BODY PIERCING

The Armed Forces have a policy on Tattoos and Body Piercing as follows:

a. Tattoos. Any tattoo(s) which is/are offensive or obscene will be a bar to entry or re-entry. Additionally tattoos should not be visible on the head and neck. Furthermore any tattoo(s) excessive in size or number may be a bar to entry or re-entry. You may be asked to complete a form describing your tattoos.

b. Body piercing. For Health and Safety reasons you will be asked to remove certain items of body piercing jewellery before undergoing physical activity as part of the application and selection process. You will not be allowed to attempt the physical activities if you do not remove the body piercing jewellery as requested. . If you are successful in your application you will be advised by
Service authorities on what the rules are for wearing body jewellery when on and off duty.

Again:

Please note that the AFCO staff are not medically qualified and that the decision regarding medical suitability for enlistment is determined by selection medical staff.
 

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LASER EYE SURGERY

Standard reply sent to all persons considering laser surgery, it's worth reading in depth:

Thank you for your enquiry regarding eyesight corrective laser surgery (corneal refractive surgery) and the relevant Royal Navy Policy. The Naval Service does not endorse the use of laser surgery as a method to gain entry and there is no guarantee that such treatment will improve vision to an acceptable standard.

The Naval Service requires individuals to serve anywhere in the world, in extremes of climate and operational situations, which are remote from primary and secondary care. Therefore, even minor conditions such as the use of correcting lenses can take on much greater significance when even basic support is limited. As a consequence, medical screening is stringent and to a higher standard than might be expected for normal civilian employment.

In general, any defect or weakness of sight will be a bar to entry if these defects render an individual incapable of, or likely to be incapable of performing general duties in the Naval Service. The tri-Service standard for uncorrected visual acuity is right eye 6/60 and left eye> 6/60.

With regard to surgical correction of myopia or hypermetropia, it is acknowledged that the following methods are now considered suitable for entry on an individual case by case basis for non-specialist employment groups and subject to single Service requirements:

(a) Photorefractive Keratectomy (PRK)

(b) Laser Epithelial Keratomileusis (LASEK)

(c) Laser in-situ Keratomileusis

(d) Intrastromal Corneal Rings (ICRs), otherwise known as Intrastromal
Segments (ICS).


Entry will not be considered for Radical Keratotomy (RK), or Astigmatic Keratotomy (AK), or any other form of incisional refractive surgery, other than those procedures listed above. All invasive intraocular surgical procedures will remain a bar to entry.

In order to be considered a candidate must fulfil the following criteria and provide documentary evidence to support that:

(a) The pre-operative refractive error was not more than +6.00 or 6.00diopter (spherical equivalent) in either eye and;

(b) The best spectacle corrected visual acuity is 6/9 or better in each eye and;

(c) At least 12 months have elapsed since the date of the last surgery or enhancement procedure and;

(d) There has been no significant visual side effects secondary to the surgery affecting daily activities and;

(e) Refraction is stable; as defined by two refractions performed on each eye at least 6 months apart, with no more than 0.50 diopter difference in the spherical equivalent in each eye.

(f) Specialist visual function testing has been carried out with satisfactory results at least 12 months following surgery, including assessment of refraction, symmetry of visual acuity, high and low contrast sensitivity (with and without glare sources), astigmatism, glare, corneal clarity, masked mild hypermetropia and night vision.

An applicant who has undergone eyesight corrective laser surgery must supply evidence of the above and may be subject to evaluation by a Service Ophthalmic Consultant. Each case is considered on an individual basis and if all the criteria are met it may be possible to consider an application to enter the Naval Service.

Decisions regarding any kind of ophthalmic surgery should be discussed with an Ophthalmic Consultant. This letter should be taken to ophthalmic consultations where eyesight corrective laser surgery is to be discussed with a view to achieving the necessary eyesight standards for entry.
 

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Current Visual Acuity Standards

Standard I (VA1)
Visual acuity to be achieved without correcting lenses Right 6/12N5, Left 6/12N5

Visual acuity to be achieved with correcting lenses Right 6/6N5, Left 6/6N5

Refraction limit:
Total hypermetropia +3.00 sphere
Astigmatism +1.25 cyl
Myopia (in any meridian) -0.75 sphere or cyl +3.00 sphere



Standard 2 (VA2)

Visual acuity to be achieved without correcting lenses Right 6/60, Left 6/60 or worse.

Visual acuity to be achieved with correcting lenses Right 6/6N5, Left 6/9N5

Refraction limit
Spectacle correction (in any meridian)
+/-6.00 sphere or cyl both.


Standard 3 (VA3)

Visual acuity to be achieved without correcting lenses Right 6/60, Left <6/60

Visual acuity to be achieved with correcting lenses EITHER Right 6/6N5, Left 6/24N10 OR Right 6/9N5, Left 6/18N10 OR Right 6/12N5, 6/12N10.

Refraction limit
Spectacle correction (in any meridian)
+/- 6.00 sphere or cyl

Below VA3, unacceptable for RM or RN service.

VA3 is the minimum acceptable standard for entry as a RM Commando.

Optician Report (CHG31 dated 04/01/2008)

Following an in-Service issue where a person was unable to pass the Annual Personal Weapons Test (AWPT) due to the inability to close their left eye independently, all entrants to the Royal Navy and Royal Marines, including their Reserve counterparts, must now have this physical ability checked during the entrance medical.

Annual Personal Weapon Test

It is a mandate that all personnel deploying to an operational theatre must have passed the Annual Personal Weapon Test (APWT). To fire an SA80 rifle effectively the user must be able to independently close the LEFT eye. As part of the Entry Medical FEMO’s are to test for the ability to close the LEFT eye independently. Those unable to do so are unfit for entry.

The latest eyesight standards according to Book of Reference 1750A Handbook of Naval Medical Standards, Chapter 5, Article 0512,.

RM Other Ranks VA III, CP4

Except

Aircrew VA I, CP1
Snipers VA I*, CP3
Landing Craft VA I*text deleted*, CP2
Swimmer Canoeists VA III*text deleted** CP3*

(*Contact lenses not permitted)
 

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Colour Perception (CP)

There are four standards of colour perception graded as follows:
Standard Test Specification. CP4 is the minimum acceptable entry standard for RM Commandos and is the standard required because of the seagoing role. Other services may well have lower acceptable colour perception standards worthy of further investigation.

CP 1
The correct recognition of coloured lights shown through the paired apertures on the Holmes-Wright lantern at LOW BRIGHTNESS at 6 metres (20 feet) distance in complete darkness

CP 2
The correct recognition of 13 out of the first 15 plates of the Ishihara Test (24-Plate abridged Edition 1969) shown in random sequence at a distance of 75 cm under standard fluorescent lighting supplied by an artificial daylight fluorescent lamp (British Standard 950: 1967)

CP 3
The correct recognition of coloured lights shown through the paired apertures on the Holmes-Wright lantern at HIGH BRIGHTNESS at 6 metres (20 feet) distance in complete darkness

CP 4
The correct recognition of colours used in relevant trade situations, and assessed by simple tests with coloured wires, resistors,
stationery tabs etc.


Personnel who fail to reach the minimum standard of colour perception are to be graded CP5 - failed trade test and colour
expanses.

Methods of testing colour perception –
Ishihara test

1. Ishihara plates are used as a screening for all entries.

2. Candidates who pass the Ishihara test are graded CP2 and require no further testing except for those whose critical visual task requires a categorisation of CP1.

3.Candidates who fail the Ishihara test are further tested for CP3 or CP4 according to requirement.


CP 5 Unable to pass any of the above tests.

1. Ishihara plates are to be used as screening for all entries.

2. Candidates who pass the Ishihara test are graded CP2 and require no further testing except for those whose critical visual task requires a categorisation of CP1.

3. Candidates who fail the Ishihara test are further tested for CP3 or CP4 according to requirement.

4. The Holmes Wright Lantern is to be used to discriminate CP1 and CP3. Appropriate trade testing (normally using a wire board and stationary tabs) will discriminate between CP4 and CP5.

Ishihara Book Test

1. Examination Method:

a. The test is conducted using only good diffused daylight directly onto the test plates or the alternative illuminant, all other light being excluded.

b. The test plates are presented to the examinee at a distance of 50-100cm
(20-40 inches) for not more than 5 seconds. The examinee may wear spectacles if appropriate. The winding line plates for illiterates normally need not be presented.

c. Each number is read aloud by the examinee. They are not allowed to trace or handle the plates.

d. The number of plates miscalled is recorded in the box on the examination form.

2. Assessment: If no error is made the examinee is graded CP2, but it should be noted that certain numbers might be miscalled by colour normals particularly when under stress. If not more than 3 plates are miscalled, the miscalled plates are shown again. If no errors are made on the second presentation, a grading of CP2 may be given.

Those failing the test will require further assessment with lanterns or trade testing to determine if their colour vision is CP3, 4 or 5.

Lantern Test

3. The Holmes-Wright Lantern Test is constructed to simulate in controlled conditions, the critical visual task of seamen. The test is usually performed by approved persons. The lantern is regarded as a form of trade test displaying pairs of vertically arranged lights in a combination of red, green and white. These are viewed at a distance of 6m (20 feet) either by direct vision or mirror reversal, in light surroundings or in total darkness as laid down in current instructions.
 

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Further Guidance on Tattoos

Service personnel must project the Service in a positive light and not to bring the Service into disrepute. Like any other UK employer whose uniformed personnel are expected to maintain public confidence, the Service sets policy on the appearance in uniform of its men and women, and this includes the nature, extent and location of tattoos.

Tattoos which are visible when No 1 uniform (RM Blues) is being worn, whether because they extend beyond the collar or cuff, or because they are being worn on the face, neck or hands, are not acceptable, are contrary to current regulations and must not be acquired. (Naval Officer and Senior Rate tropical No1 uniform do expose forearms and lower upper arms. Regulations permit the exposure of tattoos in these areas, provided they conform to the rules governing all tattoos wherever they may be.)

Tattoos are not acceptable if they are judged by the Commanding Officer, or at the recruiting stage the Recruiting Officer, to be reasonably likely to:

a. Undermine the authority or dignity of the Service or bring discredit to the Service.
b. Offend others or invite provocation, for example because they are obscene, lewd, crude, racist, sexist, homophobic, or intimidating.
c. Affect the employability of the wearer, for example by making it unacceptable for that person to parade or stand guard in public, or, depending on Branch/Specialisation and career profile, to engage on special operations.

In addition, visible tattoos must not be garish or numerous or particularly prominent (which will depend on its size and location). Commanding Officers may order personnel with tattoos which contravene the provisions above, but which are not visible in No1 uniform, to cover them up.

Service Personnel acquiring tattoos which contravene the Service policy will be invited to have their tattoos removed at their own expense. Acquisition of tattoos in contravention of the regulations and policy will result in disciplinary action and subsequent failure to remove tattoos is most likely to result in administrative discharge after an appropriate period on warning.

The Service in no way endorses or recommends that civilian personnel should have tattoos removed in order to become eligible for military service.
 

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Medical Referrals

In order to be passed fit on the day, you must have completed your eyetest also.

If there is a medical condition requiring further investigation before you can be categorically classed unfit or passed fit, the Medical Examiner (ME) will write, with your permission, to your GP requesting further detail. They typically take up to 4 weeks to respond.

(With asthma they often send a questionnaire for you GP to complete & return).

You can speed things along by ringing your GP's Practice Manager and asking them to look out for the letter & reply as soon as possible.

If the ME can make a definitive decision from the information provided by your GP, then you will be passed fit/or otherwise.

If further detail is required & is available locally, the ME will again request it from a hospital or wherever the information is held (up to another 4 weeks).

Alternatively if the information is such that the outcome is inconclusive, then the information is forwarded to the Senior Medical Officer (Service Entry), soon to be relocated at the Institute of Naval Medicine (INM) in Alverstoke, near Portsmouth in the newly named Aviation Medical Division. If the SMO can may a definitive decision, referring to the respective specialists in the relevant medical area, then that is passed back to the MO. Typically the turn-around time is within 4 weeks.

If the SMO cannot make a definitive decision, then an appointment is made with a specialist in the relevant medical area of expertise. This can be at the INM Alverstoke, Guys London or Birmingham. The RN/RM pays for your rail ticket (and accommodation, if necessary) for you to attend this appointment. Specialist medical appointments usually take over 4 weeks to arrange.

Hope that helps those in similar situations.
 

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Significat changes to VA2 Eyesight Standards

The third post on this thread has been amended to reflect the latest standards for Visual Acuity standard 2.
 

JamesBL

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Ninja, I click on that PDF link, and it saying something about this PULHHEEMS System, could you explain what that is please?

Thanks
Ben
 

Ninja_Stoker

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If you click on the 'Enter Book' icon, it's all explained at Chapter 1 annex 1A as follows:

The assessment of physical and mental fitness for service in the Royal Navy is based on the system described as PULHHEEMS - A Joint Service System of Medical Classification. Medical examinations are to be made iaw that authority as modified by the instructions contained in the publication.

P = Age, build, strength and stamina

U = Strength, range of movement and general efficiency of upper arm, shoulder girdle and back.

L = Strength, range of movement and efficiency of feet, legs, pelvis ? girdle and lower back.

H H = Audio metrically assessed acuity of hearing. The sum of hearing
loss at various Frequencies.

E E = Visual acuity. A simple record of visual acuity which has no relationship with any other quality. Eye disease might affect the P quality.

M = Mental Capacity

S = Emotional stability, Personality

There are numerical degrees evaluated at each initial.
 

JamesBL

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Ahhh thank you for clearing up for me. I was wondering could you clear something else up for me. I failed my medical march last year due to having a plate in my leg. I've now had it removed and the doctor has said that my leg will be stronger than it was before my accident, I was wondering do I have a better chance of passing my medical next time round when I apply June next year.

Thanks
 

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It's impossible to say unfortunately.

Even a qualified Medical Examiner would be hard pushed to give a quantifiable opinion based on supposition rather than by having the X-rays, surgeons notes & the full details on which to make a decision. Once the medical Officer at your local AFCO has the full details, he or she will be able to give you an honest answer.

Best of luck.
 

JamesBL

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It's impossible to say unfortunately.

Even a qualified Medical Examiner would be hard pushed to give a quantifiable opinion based on supposition rather than by having the X-rays, surgeons notes & the full details on which to make a decision. Once the medical Officer at your local AFCO has the full details, he or she will be able to give you an honest answer.

Best of luck.
Ok Ninja thanks for your help, I'll have to get in contact with the hospital a.s.a.p.

Thanks again.
 

SPARTAN117

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Hi Ninja

I know you're career advisor who had dealings with recruits who have question concerning laser eye surgery. i had LASEK done about one and a half year ago, I see 20/25 and 20/37 in my eyes and there are not side affects and the visions stablized but I had my worst eye before correction is like 8 diopters and thats beyond the regulations. May i still apply to join the Royal Marines? And even if I passed all medicial exaimes can i still apply for the Special Forces?
 

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If your eyesight meets the minimum Visual Acuity standard for entry, providing you checked pre-surgery it was one of the accepted forms of surgery & 12 months have expired then it is worth applying.

Post 2 & Post 3 of this thread give the answers to the query with regard SF eyesight requirements.

Best of luck.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Latest Medical Standards for Entry

Initial Medical and Physical Criteria

? The Naval Service requires anyone who enters to be medically fit to serve worldwide.

? New entrants to the Armed Forces undergo intensive training, which is both physically and mentally demanding. The Armed Forces medical authorities have to be aware of your medical history and of any conditions that may affect your performance as a serviceman or servicewoman. Applicants who do not meet the required medical standards may be rejected.

? Your medical history is confidential and will not be given to anyone not authorised to hold this information.

The initial medical examination

? Your examination will take place locally and be arranged by your AFCO. Further medical examinations for some branches may be conducted later in the selection process and your CA will be able to offer advice regarding this requirement.

Basic medical requirements:

Medical conditions that preclude entry:

? The conditions in the table below make a person permanently unsuitable, except where specifically time limited, for entry into the Naval Service.

? Note: This table is for general guidance only. Many conditions that are compatible with civilian employment and sport may be considered incompatible with military service. If you have a recurrent medical condition that is not mentioned below, or if you are unclear about the impact of your medical history, you should seek further advice from your CA.

? Please note that Careers Advisers and their office staff are not medically qualified and that all final decisions regarding medical suitability for entry are only made by appropriately appointed medical staff.

Eye disorders

Eye disease, e.g. glaucoma, keratoconus, retinitis pigmentosa. Double vision. Visual field defects. Corneal grafts or recurrent corneal ulcers. Cataract or cataract surgery. Detached retina. Vision only in one eye. Squint surgery in the previous six months. Laser eye surgery in the previous 12 months.

Ear, nose and throat disorders

Ongoing ear, nose, throat or sinus disease. Deafness. Presence of grommets. Current perforated eardrum. Certain surgical procedures.
Heart and cardiovascular disorders Heart disease. Certain congenital heart conditions e.g. repair of tetralogy of fallot, coarctation of the aorta. Certain heart valve abnormalities. High blood pressure. Raynaud?s disease.

Respiratory disorders

Asthma, wheeze or asthma symptoms or treatment within the past four years. Lung disease including chronic bronchitis, emphysema, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis. Active tuberculosis.

Abdominal and digestive disorders, including diet

Ongoing abdominal, digestive or liver disease. Crohn?s disease. Ulcerative colitis. Loss of spleen (splenectomy). Chronic hepatitis. Untreated hernia. Requirement for specific dietary restriction.

Neurological disorders

Ongoing nervous system disease. Epilepsy or more than one seizure/fit after the age of five (although benign Rolandic epilepsy is acceptable). Single seizure/fit within the last ten years. Multiple sclerosis. Complications following head injury. Hydrocephalus (with or without shunt). Severe or recurrent headache (including migraine).

Endocrine disorders

Diabetes. Adrenal disorders. Pituitary disorders. Certain thyroid diseases.
Skin disorders Chronic eczema or dermatitis. Severe psoriasis. Severe acne.

Male reproductive disorders

Current cancer of the testicle or prostate gland. Chronic scrotal pain.

Musculoskeletal disorders

Any abnormality that interferes with the ability to undertake military training. Spinal abnormalities. Certain spinal operations. Recurrent back pain or sciatica. Joint disease, pain or limitation of joint movement. Hypermobility (laxity) of the joints. Bone or joint operations within the last 12 months. Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Recurrent joint dislocations. Severe deformity following fractures. Loss of a limb. Foot abnormalities (e.g. club foot or hammer toe). Complete loss of either big toe. Complete loss of either thumb. Arthritis and similar conditions. Fractures within the last 12 months, except fractures of the digits / clavicles.

Blood disorders

Certain blood diseases, such as G6PDD, sickle cell disease, congenital spherocytosis, haemoglobinopathy. Any clotting disorder or abnormality of blood clotting.
Infections Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome AIDS). Carriers of hepatitis viruses.

Malignancy (cancer)

Most cancers are considered to place an applicant below the medical entry standard. Exceptions: some cancers in childhood or early adult life that have been successfully treated and are regarded as cured.

Allergic disorders

Severe allergic reactions and/or anaphylaxis. A need to carry adrenaline injections (EPIPEN, etc). Nut and peanut allergy. Egg allergy. Latex allergy. Vaccine allergy (including tetanus allergy). Gluten sensitivity (Coeliac disease).
Conditions resulting from exposure to extremes of temperature
Heat illness.

Frostbite and non-freezing cold injury.
Psychiatric disorders Ongoing psychiatric illness. Psychosis. Schizophrenia. Obsessive-compulsive disorder. Autism. Personality disorder. More than one episode of deliberate self-harm of any type. Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Alcohol, drug or substance dependence. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) unless free of symptoms and not requiring treatment for at least three years. Anorexia and bulimia.
Kidney disorders Ongoing kidney disease. Polycystic kidney disease and kidney stones. Donation of kidney in the past six months.

Other Transplanted organs.

Temporary conditions

The following conditions require the selection procedure and/or entry to be temporarily put on hold until you are fully recovered, discharged from hospital follow-up, and fit to undergo arduous training:

? Waiting list for an operation
? Temporary illness or injury

At the discretion of Service medical authorities, your application may be rejected, due to other medical reasons.

Height and Weight

? Royal Navy and Royal Marines: The minimum height is 151.5cm. The minimum weight requirement for Royal Marines is *text deleted*60kg for those who passed PRMC before 01 April 2011. all those entering into the selection process after 01 April 2011 must be a minimum of *text deleted*65 Kgs upon entry regardless of height.

[*text deleted*Updated 08/05/2011)


Eye Sight

The minimum standards for both uncorrected and corrected vision are determined by service medical staff and are dependent on the proposed employment and branch/trade group. Spectacle or contact lens correction must not be greater than -7 dioptres or +8 dioptres in any meridian. Impaired colour perception (colour blindness) is not a bar to service, but may limit your career choices. You will need to have a copy with you of any acuity prescription from your optician when you go for your medical examination.
 

Grierson

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Nose Bleeds

Hi, I'm hoping to join the Royal Marines next year but I have a histroy of having nose bleeds, however, I have had my nose quartised twice. I have since had one minor bleed within a wek of having it done. I have not had a bleed for about 12 months now.

Assuming I am going ahead with my application to join up next year, I will be clear for over two years. Will this hinder my chances of joining?

Thanks in advance,

Tom
 

jdvc1993

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Question about allergies

Hey Ninja,
I notice in the medical standards for entry it says that "Severe allergies" bar you from entry, what is considered severe, in the past I have had allergies though i grew out of most of them and hope to grow out of all of them, would this bar me from entry?
 

joelhall

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when i joined the regulars id had panic attacks (well, generalised anxiety disorder). i recieved a letter from a medical officer (think he was a surgeon-captain) telling me i could reapply and be accepted after three years of no symptoms, army said 18 months. this is noted as the time period for adhd i noticed too.

is this still the case and is the waiting period the same in the rmr as regular?
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Hey Ninja,
I notice in the medical standards for entry it says that "Severe allergies" bar you from entry, what is considered severe, in the past I have had allergies though i grew out of most of them and hope to grow out of all of them, would this bar me from entry?
The medical standards for entry state the following are a bar to entry:

Allergic disorders

Severe allergic reactions and/or anaphylaxis.

A need to any adrenaline injections (EPIPEN etc.). Nut and peanut allergy. Egg allergy. Latex allergy.

Vaccine allergy (including Tetanus allergy). Gluten sensitivity (Coeliac disease).


Beyond what is stated, the medical examiner is the only person qualified to determine what is viewed as severe. The second paragraph above (in blue) determines which allergies are a bar, regardless of severity. If there is documented proof to establish categorically that you no longer suffer from allergic reactions then you are advised to bring it to your medical examination.

when i joined the regulars id had panic attacks (well, generalised anxiety disorder). i recieved a letter from a medical officer (think he was a surgeon-captain) telling me i could reapply and be accepted after three years of no symptoms, army said 18 months. this is noted as the time period for adhd i noticed too.

is this still the case and is the waiting period the same in the rmr as regular?
Medical standards for entry in the RMR are exactly the same as regular RM.

Those with former service, who were discharged on medical grounds will have their former medical documents scrutinised - if the letter states 3 years symptom free, that's what it means.

For ADHD, the individual must be completely symptom & treatment free for between 3-5 years depending on the medical history & the age at which it was last treated. Again, the medical examiner is the only person qualified to give definitive medical advice in this area.
 
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