Overpronation and lower leg injuries

Discussion in 'Common Training Injuries' started by ThurmanMurman99, Nov 25, 2016.

  1. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    Hi all, I went to a physiotherapy appointment today and was told I am an overpronator; this is the reason that I am experiencing pain in the joint of my big toe on my left foot- the bone is grinding inside of the joint due to my natural foot strike whilst running and therefore it is creating a calloused ridge along the joint and is causing my sometimes debilitating discomfort. To prevent the injury he recommended I invest in a pair of orthotics to correct the overpronation however before I spend £150 on a pair of fancy insoles I would like anyone who may have experienced this type of injury or who has any knowledge applicable to this to give me a bit of advice on what I should do and if there is any other way of preventing the overpronation. Thanks in advance
     
  2. CSVern

    CSVern Active Member

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    I can't help you on prevention or a cure, but I know if you're paying £150 for insoles you're being ripped off.
    If you go to a specialist running store they will be able to do you a custom pair of moulded insoles for £60 tops.
    I've gotten a couple pairs over the years and they helped with my shin pain. As a bonus they're incredibly comfortable, like walking on a cloud! :)
     
  3. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    What a little *text deleted*! I'm worried though that if I pass into RT, I'll pick up alot of injuries as I wont be able to use the orthotic, any advice?
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    One thing I can tell you is that flat feet are not a bar to entry but prescribed orthotic insoles are a bar to entry as they indicate a significant pre-existing recurrent injury which is likely to get worse during the rigours of Royal Marines Recruit Training.

    If you need insoles, buy over the counter insoles such as Sorbothane.
     
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  5. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    I understand, which is why I am worried that I will pick up alot of injuries in training(if I get in ofcourse) as I am getting injuries now just from doing light running. I feel that it will become a persistent injury as this comdition only gets worse as time goes on unless I use an orthotic to correct the overpronation or so I am told. Have you any advice?
     
  6. CSVern

    CSVern Active Member

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    You shouldn't be going down with a pre-existing anyway, but if you need them whilst in RT I have heard of guys getting them through the med centre.
    Though this would cause an issue if you were to ever leave and then try to re-apply.
    If this is the case then you need to stop running, take a step back and look hard at your running technique, footwear and all else to do with our running as something is clearly not right.
    Hopefully it isn't an injury, but the main point is if you're in pain doing what you are now then you need to stop doing it!
     
  7. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    I understand that I shouldnt be going through the proccess with an injury however I have stopped training and I am asking you for advice as the only solution according to my physio is orthotics which isnt ideal and i already wear running shoes from a specialist running shop designed to help lower the degree of overpronation- please do not mustake me for being a bit if a *text deleted* I'm just abit worried as it would be a big spanner in the works if i cannot overcome this
     
  8. old-lynx-mech

    old-lynx-mech Active Member

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    Loads you can do to correct it. Take a peek on the internet. Few examples here.

    Golf Ball Roll
    Exactly what it sounds like. You’ve used a foam roller before? Same idea here. You’re using the golf ball to perform self myofascial release (your own personal deep-tissue massage!) on the plantar fascia in your foot. Roll the golf ball under each foot for 30-60 seconds, pausing for 10 seconds on any painful points. As you do this, perform an active stretch of the muscles underneath the fascia by pulling your toes up towards your shins.

    Big Toe Pushdowns
    Stand with your foot and ankle in neutral position. Push down through your big toe without allowing the ankle to roll in or the arch to collapse. Start by holding that for 5 seconds, 10 times on each side (or do both sides at once). As you get stronger, hold the toe down for longer stretches and fewer repetitions. You’ll start to feel that muscle (flexor hallicus) contract under the arch of the foot. As it gets stronger, you’ll be able to consciously engage that muscle whenever you’re performing weight bearing exercise.

    Calf Stretch w/ Tibialis Anterior Activation
    You’ve probably done this stretch plenty before, but this time you’re going to do it with a neutral foot position, while pulling your toes up. One foot forward, one foot back, with hands braced against a wall. Press the heel of the back foot into the floor behind you and lean into the wall with the knee straight. Don’t allow your ankle to roll in. Pull the toes of the back foot up toward your shin and hold. Hold for 30 seconds on each side, repeat 3-5 times.
     
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  9. CSVern

    CSVern Active Member

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    Understood mate, it's a sucky deal to be in.
    I was dealing with shin pain for a few months before I sorted it by altering my running technique, which is why I'm not a massive fan of just buying expensive shoes/orthotics as they tend to just cover up the problem rather than finding and solving the cause of the pain.
    My issue was slight overpronation too, though only a little bit this coupled with landing on my heel was causing all sorts of trouble. After I concentrated on landing on the ball of my foot the pain disappeared within a week.
    Your pain is in your toe which could be a different issue altogether, but I would put money a fix being found by experimenting with different running technique, and perhaps some custom insoles if you can swing it.
    Other than that, stretch and ice plenty!
     
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  10. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    Thanks mate i appreciate the advice, Ill rest for a week or so and try and run with a different foot strike, touch wood it helps -nailbiting-
     
  11. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    Wicked mate I'll add these to my stretching routine, really appreciate the time and effort youve put in to reply and give me tips, cheers pal
     
  12. A350-800

    A350-800 Member

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    Hello :) I am sorry to hear about your injury, I have recently been down the orthotics root and though it didn't help for me, it is something you should consider. I have found there is big debate over the effectiveness of orthotics and how they work for some people wonderfully but not at all for others. I agree that custom orthotics are probably over perscribed to an awful lot of people who either don't need them or whom would be helped equally by far cheaper over the counter yet alternatives. However, With respect to some of the above posters, if you are found to need custom orthotics after an investigation from a podiatrist or physiotherapist then despite the cost this is something you should go for if over the counter supports prove insufficient; some people really do benefit from them and there really is a big difference between the heat mouldable type you can buy over the counter at a high street store and custom made Kevlar or carbon fibre orthotics. By all means please try out the cheaper options first, as some see big improvement from a change in shoe or from the orthotics you can buy such as foot balance insoles or superfeet insoles. I have lower leg injuries and I have tried both over the counter orthotics and custom insoles; neither worked for me, but they were absolutely worth the try anyway just in case, unfortunately orthotics obviously have no garuntee of working :(. There was a huge difference between the quality of the insoles; the custom pair were much more hard wearing and far more supportive with sections built in to them to offload tendons in my feet, something you cannot really have done with high street insoles. They were also much lighter and whilst my heat mouldable over the counter insoles lasted 3 months before wearing away and cost £40, my carbon insoles would actually have lasted 5 years and this would actually work out cheaper. As mentioned above , please also investigate whether you really need orthotics at all; I have found my feet are actually less painful when they are allowed to pronate a bit as it seems to help me absorb impact :) changing your running style can be very helpful, however please don't make the same mistake I did and focus solely on foot strike, I have found after lots of frustration that it is not neccescarily how your foot lands on the ground (modfoot, heel or forefoot) but whether it lands gently and under your centre of gravity so as to not put excess force through your body :) please also make gradual changes as I was an idiot and decided to change to 180bpm cadence after about a week :/ I am sorry for the long rambly post but I have been in this exact situation and as the lads above mentioned I would recommend you try the cheaper insoles first :) I hope you get better soon :)
     
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    Last edited: Nov 25, 2016
  13. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    Thanks for your insight, I think i will continue stretching and resting for a week and then I will go and buy some cheap insoles to see if they work any better, however if my problems are persistant then I may try and raise the funds for a pair of custom carbon orthotics as my physio has suggested as although I would prefer to treat it without having to use an orthotic, it is better than nkthibg - cheers mate and take care
     
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  14. A350-800

    A350-800 Member

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    :)
     
  15. ERFC

    ERFC Active Member

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    Just don't get prescribed orthotics from a podiatrist which are custom made as this is a bar to entrance!
     
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  16. ThurmanMurman99

    ThurmanMurman99 New Member

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    I understand and am being wary, I go to a provate physio who is probably more inclined to trying to sell me treatment than a NHS physio , cheers for the heads up ;)
     
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