Pavel's Naked Warrior Training - Interesting Reading

sjuggins

Member
Joined
Oct 1, 2007
Posts
31
Reaction score
0
Guys,

I've been surfing around the net as I was bored at work (as usual) and came across some interesting reading by a guy called Pavel Tsatsouline who's an ex Russian Spetznaz PTI. Essentially this guy advocates a method of training that he calls "GTG - Grease The Groove" which he learnt from his father and then developed further in the Russian special forces.

The GTG method uses the ideal that you increase the frequency you train but never go to failure, always do about half your max. The example he talks about in his book is based on his father-in-law (an ex US-Marine), he got his father-in-law to always do an easy set of 5 chin-ups when he went down to the basement, this would then total anywhere between 25 - 100 throughout the day. After a couple of months the father-in-law took a few days rest and then tried for a personal record, he easily managed 20 chin-ups, more than he could do when he was a marine 40 years ago!

There are lots of testimonials (true or not, who knows) of guys that have increased the amount of pull ups they do just by reducing the reps and doing lots of sets, such as every time you go to the kitchen you do 3 reps. (Pavel does talk at great length about other training items such as learning to tense your muscle correctly for maximum contraction etc, but this is far too detailed to sum up on here).

I was just wondering if anybody had come across this training method before or even uses it?

As I've got plenty of time until my selection weekend (March 2008), I'm thinking of trying this training method until Christmas to see if it works. I was thinking of doing the following every time I go to the kitchen, toilet or upstairs, it should only take a minute or so to complete :-

2-3 Pullups
15-20 Pushups
20 Situps

What do you guys think, interesting or a load of old tosh?
 

Mackie

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Oct 26, 2007
Posts
242
Reaction score
1
I'd have to give it a read but I think most training methods that involve regular work-out of the muscles will make them a lot stronger over time.

Thanks for the tip, I might give this a go myself.
 

lord_carl

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Sep 15, 2007
Posts
260
Reaction score
5
I do this method every time i leave my room i do 6 pull ups on the bar and in a month *text deleted* gone from Maximum of 8 to 15 so it dose work for me in that sence
 

MasoN

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Aug 18, 2007
Posts
259
Reaction score
0
Sounds good but i only have 1 argument, aren't you suppose to let the muscles rest so they can build themselves? I don't know anything in this area but it's what i've seen in posts.
 

RC

Active Member
Joined
Mar 6, 2007
Posts
561
Reaction score
0
Alright Mate.

I've got most of Pavels ebooks ( Power to the people / Naked Warrior / Russian Kettlebell Challenge / Bullet Proof Abs / Relax into Stretching etc ).

Not brilliant but they are worth a read.

I have used GTG ( Still do occassionally ). It certainly works for most people regards increasing max strength. I don't think it is particularly effective for increasing strength endurance ( press-ups / sit-ups ), particularly when you get into the higher rep ranges.

It's worth giving GTG a go for pull-ups and other max strength exercises.

Mason -

Yeah, you are supposed to allow time for muscles to recover with most other forms of training. The idea of GTG is to never really fatigue your muscles by stopping well short of failure. For example if you can do 10 pull-ups, you would only do between 3 - 6 ( dependant on the individual ). You would do this numerous times throughout the day.

Basically, increases in strength occur predominently through training the CNS to recruit more muscle fibres.

Rich.
 
Top