Philosophical question

KatnissEverdeen

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In philosophy class we were asked this thought provoking questions in which I am interested in hearing your opinions:
If someone you loved was killed in front of you, but someone created a copy of them that was perfect right down to the atomic level, would they be the same person and would you love them just as much?

Personally I am sitting on the fence. Sure I would probably still love them but its an unusual thought to have. I am in decisive.
 

CallMeLucifer

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Do they have all of their past memories and experiences up till the moment they died?
 

KatnissEverdeen

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Do they have all of their past memories and experiences up till the moment they died?
Mate I would assume so as its basically an exact copy of the person but I cant say for sure I am not my philosophy teacher ha ha
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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No because it’s not reality. And it’s not the same person, it’s a copy. The trauma of watching a loved would die in front of you would affect the way you feel.
At first you would probably be happy to accept a copy because you haven’t grieved correctly. But eventually you would resent that it was just a copy. You will still have the memories, emotions and thoughts of watching them die. That will eat away at you building in mistrust, resentment and anger.

The fact that everything is temporary is what gives life value. “Immortality” is achieved by reproducing and passing on your genes, memories, mannerisms and anecdotes on.
 

CallMeLucifer

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Mate I would assume so as its basically an exact copy of the person but I cant say for sure I am not my philosophy teacher ha ha

If that's the case, I think I would. But seeing them die only to be brought back via a clone would implant doubts in my mind.
 

Chelonian

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Perhaps the wellbeing of the clone should also be considered. All well and good to satisfy the self-indulgent needs of the bereaved but what would be the psychological impact on the clone?

@KatnissEverdeen Was the clone's welfare considered during the class discussion? If the feelings of bereaved relatives were the main focus of discussion there is arguably a philosophical issue about our own attitudes.
 

Rob20

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I really can't stand these kind of philosophical hypotheticals. My missus reads loads of stuff about real whacky psychology, which grips me because I'm mega into it. One recent discussion was something along the lines of "you're an average everyday Joe, if you ran into your child's school during an armed attacker scenario, you dont know where the gunman is, you can hear you're child in one direction, but a whole classroom of kids in the opposite direction. Who do you go to help?"

I was like what can you actually learn about anybodys psyche or thought process from these mental scenarios.
1- these crazy situations are so farfetched that nobody could really tell you how they'd react anyway
2- lets live in reality and learn about ourselves with everyday occurences

I'm a massive people watcher and love watching/reading/hearing about how people deal with everyday hardships.
How you react to many everyday tasks I think says alot about who/what you are.

Take your actions over the course of an average week:
Do you get up as soon as your alarm goes off, make your bed, get showered etc, or do you snooze for an hour, have breakfast in bed as opposed to getting up, not shower first thing because you "might do phys" at 11am?

How do you rationalise things? This could be as small as "I feel really stressed today, but that's absolutely fine because work was busy and I was late getting home for my wife's dinner", or something so many or us get wrong "christ I'm so sad all the time after dad died, but this is also normal I'm grieving". Being able to understand and rationalise emotions can make you almost bullet proof. Unfortunately alot of people don't have that understanding so many jump to the conclusion of they must be depressed.

I won't go on but perhaps a few small examples which show someone who is driven and someone who is not, someone who can respond logically under adversity and rationalise their thoughts and take control, and someone who will allow outside stressors to take control of them.


Apologies for taking philosophical and turning it psychological however I strongly believe that dealing in hypotheticals which philosophers love to do will gain you nothing, however looking into how we respond to things from a psychological perspective each and every day can have massive benefits for everyone. It doesn't have to be overthought however two things I consciously look to when I'm hanging out abit or am in abit of a sticky spot are:

1- when faced with a choice, always take the positive option (make the bed, go for the run etc)

2- respond with logic, dont react with emotion (we all have sent an angry text to someone and later regretted it, wait 24 hours and I bet you wont send the text, dont let emotion dictate your every move)
 

AsdaOwn

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What type of school do you do to were you have a philosophy class?!

It’s like the floatation tank question. Which is would you live your life in a floating tank if, in your unconscious state they could project a fake virtual reality life. It would feel real to you. I’d say I couldn’t love the copy the same way as their conscious experience wouldn’t be the same and as such not the same person
 

Chelonian

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I agree with @Rob20 that practical philosophical conundrums are better than the whacky sci-fi ones because we encounter them in everyday life.

As a student should one challenge a philosophy tutor because the philosophical dilemma presented for consideration is lazy and dumbed down?
 

AsdaOwn

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I agree with @Rob20 that practical philosophical conundrums are better than the whacky sci-fi ones because we encounter them in everyday life.

As a student should one challenge a philosophy tutor because the philosophical dilemma presented for consideration is lazy and dumbed down?
I didn’t think a teacher would ask a question about the traumatic death of a loved one!? Is this a gcse class katniss?
 

Chelonian

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If two people were trapped in a burning building and you were given the task of rescuing only one would you rescue the three-month old boy or the forty-five year old woman? What factors would influence your choice?
 

Illustrious

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If two people were trapped in a burning building and you were given the task of rescuing only one would you rescue the three-month old boy or the forty-five year old woman? What factors would influence your choice?
is the 45 year old woman my wife? Because I'd never hear the end of her moaning, even if she did die in the fire.
 

Rob20

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Quite simple whoever you found first.

In my mind the choice between middle aged woman or baby wouldn't be as difficult to cope with compared to having to deal with the knowledge that you took the choice to leave the first person you found to die.

Final answer Chris, the first person you found.


Just realised, perhaps I've cheated and not actually gave an answer at all -banghead-. But as I said philosophy isn't my thing
 

KatnissEverdeen

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I didn’t think a teacher would ask a question about the traumatic death of a loved one!? Is this a gcse class katniss?
Mate death will happen to all of us. Its a philosophy class not a lets not talk about death because it could be traumatic class. I don't think the religious studies exam will count for people who lost a loved one. A teacher told me that one of the questions in last year in the gcse paper was ‘is suicide right’. That again is arguably a sensitive topic but the gcse mark board unfortunately don't care they just give you a mark and put it on some paper
 

KatnissEverdeen

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If two people were trapped in a burning building and you were given the task of rescuing only one would you rescue the three-month old boy or the forty-five year old woman? What factors would influence your choice?
The one whose most likely to survive depending on a number of factors and the one I spot first. If the woman has got a traumatic injury then Ill go for the baby and vice versa but If I find one first then Ill go for them. But I am assuming they are in the same room
 
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