Potential Stress Fracture and Medical Issue

Eafy

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Afternoon all.

I've got my recruit tests for the RMR next week, but am currently struggling a bit after pushing myself (perhaps) a bit too much last week.

As a little background, I have had to take a week or so off a couple of times previously during my training which was due to shin splints - which I'm assuming was caused by trying to increase my speed and my mileage of my runs - but all has been fine up until the end of last week.

Fast forward to now, where I had to stop during my warm-up 1.5 mile run on Monday due to pain in my left leg, lower down on the inside just above the ankle. This is more of a pin-pointed pain that what I've experienced in the past, and gives me a dull ache even walking. I've been icing it, deep heating it and am planning on taking the next two weeks off of running to let it settle - but obviously after "googling" what's wrong, it looks like I may have a stress fracture. Obviously I am worried about getting a scan done as I don't want it on my medical records, especially as I haven't even had my medical yet, but I'm starting to get worried as it can be a

The question is, how long do I need to rest it for, what training can I compensate for it in the meantime and what do I say during the medical (if I pass the recruit tests)!?

Thanks for any advice on these points and as you can probably tell, I'm pretty pissed-off now, especially as I finally got a PR for a 5k of 22 minutes last week (not bad for a chubby bloke who started with a 35 minute 5k!).
 

Chelonian

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Thanks for any advice on these points...

There are some comprehensive notes on shin splints posted by @Rover
Take a squiz. You'll find them via the forum search box.

On a general note. Don't underestimate the value of rest as a part of any intensive training regime. Best of luck.
 

pacessdo

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Aperatly stress fracture takes about 6-8 weeks to heal, working out could make it much worse that what it is and it could take much more time to heal or it could never heal properly at all! I would suggest swimming or cycling for your cardio workouts. Good luck
 

Guest

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Afternoon all.

I've got my recruit tests for the RMR next week, but am currently struggling a bit after pushing myself (perhaps) a bit too much last week.

As a little background, I have had to take a week or so off a couple of times previously during my training which was due to shin splints - which I'm assuming was caused by trying to increase my speed and my mileage of my runs - but all has been fine up until the end of last week.

Fast forward to now, where I had to stop during my warm-up 1.5 mile run on Monday due to pain in my left leg, lower down on the inside just above the ankle. This is more of a pin-pointed pain that what I've experienced in the past, and gives me a dull ache even walking. I've been icing it, deep heating it and am planning on taking the next two weeks off of running to let it settle - but obviously after "googling" what's wrong, it looks like I may have a stress fracture. Obviously I am worried about getting a scan done as I don't want it on my medical records, especially as I haven't even had my medical yet, but I'm starting to get worried as it can be a

The question is, how long do I need to rest it for, what training can I compensate for it in the meantime and what do I say during the medical (if I pass the recruit tests)!?

Thanks for any advice on these points and as you can probably tell, I'm pretty *text deleted*-off now, especially as I finally got a PR for a 5k of 22 minutes last week (not bad for a chubby bloke who started with a 35 minute 5k!).

I am sorry to hear of your injury so close to your tests. Because this is an online forum and I am no doctor it is difficult to confirm a diagnosis, which is what is needed to determine how much rest is required, what activities can be done instead and what to do next. Though your symptoms do sound like a stress fracture, I would strongly recommend booking in to see a sports physio, before your medical if possible. There are other structures in the inside of the shin just above the ankle which can create a similar dull, occasionally sharp and throbbing pain to a stress fracture. The posterior tibialis tendon and muscle run down this ankle and shin area and are commonly irritated, especially if posterior shin splints have occurred before. It is best you get this checked out so you progress onwards, a good private physio would be able to give you a diagnosis and instruct you with what to do next, and it won't go on your records. They can be expensive , but it is worth it when you could quickly get some professional advice and reassurance and minimise the risk of training and further injuring.
I haven't applied yet because I am not yet fit enough but I understand how you feel. Injuries like this can feel very cruel and disheartening when you have achieved so much, but one thing I have learnt from past injuries is that In the wider picture a training injury is likely just a setback and it is how it is dealt with which is important. I caused a lot of problems for myself flapping around and getting stressed when I should have seen a professional physio to give me a proper diagnosis sooner. You have already done a lot better than this by stopping running on it. Perhaps slowing down your application will relieve some of the pressure, I realise this is something that you won't want to do but lots of people on this forum have an injury right at the last moment and have to postpone. The good thing is that people find that time useful for preparing even further and then smash it for their pjft and prmc.
I wish you well with your recovery and training, keep us updated :)
 
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Cuzza22297

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I second the post above, a physio isn't cheap but worked wonders for me. Think it'd definitely be worth you giving one a go.
 

Eafy

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Thanks for the info gents.

We've got a sports physio at work whom I've seen before for some help with a cheeky bit of PF in my heel, so I'll book in to see him again.

What shall I do about my medical, if I pass recruit tests? Do I let them know I've had some "discomfort" in my leg recently, so am currently resting it - or do I self-diagnose?

As a side note, I have decided that I will have the rest of this week off, then head back to the gym next week to focus on adding numbers to my bodyweight exercises, which I was struggling to make progress on due to the amount of running I was doing and how taxing it was.

Silver lining, eh?
 

Mattys

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Thanks for the info gents.

We've got a sports physio at work whom I've seen before for some help with a cheeky bit of PF in my heel, so I'll book in to see him again.

What shall I do about my medical, if I pass recruit tests? Do I let them know I've had some "discomfort" in my leg recently, so am currently resting it - or do I self-diagnose?

As a side note, I have decided that I will have the rest of this week off, then head back to the gym next week to focus on adding numbers to my bodyweight exercises, which I was struggling to make progress on due to the amount of running I was doing and how taxing it was.

Silver lining, eh?

I personally wouldn’t say anything!

I made this mistake and was made TMU for the 2nd time because of it I said on my medical questionnaire I hurt my ankle when I was 21 (7years ago) but there’s no proof of it on my medical records as it was jut a check up after a football match so capita had to write to get notes on it and this will have put me back at least 6 weeks!.
I have a medical paper appointment next week just to get this issue cleared because of my stupidness.
If you tell them your having issues with your leg they will no doubt make you tmu and for you to get it sorted and diagnosed by a GP to what it is.

When I spoke to capita few days ago questioning my medicals I was even told that they’ve had people TMU just for mentioning they had headaches and anything that doesn’t have notes on or a diagnosis will result in failing no matter how small the detail is.

I understand capita need to cover there own ends as itl fall back on them if they pass people and they get injured for something they let pass but they also make more money the more times they see you I’ve questioned both my medicals now so if it’s not on your medical history don’t mention it.
 

Guest

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Thanks for the info gents.

We've got a sports physio at work whom I've seen before for some help with a cheeky bit of PF in my heel, so I'll book in to see him again.

What shall I do about my medical, if I pass recruit tests? Do I let them know I've had some "discomfort" in my leg recently, so am currently resting it - or do I self-diagnose?

As a side note, I have decided that I will have the rest of this week off, then head back to the gym next week to focus on adding numbers to my bodyweight exercises, which I was struggling to make progress on due to the amount of running I was doing and how taxing it was.

Silver lining, eh?

Good idea to see physio and focus on body weight exercises in gym, if I can't run due to a problem then trying to improve my push ups and pull ups makes me feel a lot better :)
 

cc1

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obviously after "googling" what's wrong, it looks like I may have a stress fracture.

Google "Headache" and you'll wind-up absolutely convinced you're in the final, fatal-throws of a catastrophic brain haemorrhage.

Unless your symptoms have been diagnosed by a professional none of us can really give you genuinely helpful advice, bar a liberal application of RICE. I'm not talking about the Basmati variety either; Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation.

Alternatively, there's a small band of highly-trained, highly-paid, elite specialists that can sort you out... aka... Doctors.
 
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