Questions about the Royal Marines

Shikamaru

New Member
Joined
Jun 14, 2020
Posts
2
Reaction score
5
Hello I have two questions I saw online that you cant choose what job you do in the royal marines you are just sent where ever they choose and at the begining of the year I weighed 120kg and as of this morning i weighed 86.6kg (for reference i am 5'10) should i loose more weight before I apply as I am not getting the full 13 pull ups previously required before the VPJFT
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Jul 20, 2015
Posts
5,303
Reaction score
8,286
Hello I have two questions I saw online that you cant choose what job you do in the royal marines you are just sent where ever they choose and at the begining of the year I weighed 120kg and as of this morning i weighed 86.6kg (for reference i am 5'10) should i loose more weight before I apply as I am not getting the full 13 pull ups previously required before the VPJFT
Question 1:
You don’t get to choose. But you can have preferences and if there is an opening then you can. However the Specialisations have gone through a change so it will be different.
Either way, you aren’t stuck in that “job” (specialisation) for your whole career. You would be able to change after a Return of Service of a set amount of time, say 1 or 2 years for example.

Question 2:
As for where ever, then yes again, you can have a preference of which Unit you go to. But ultimately it’s where the manning is required. And as for deployments then yes, you will have to go unless some major welfare reasons or you are required elsewhere.

That’s a good effort on losing so much weight, keep it up. But you dont have to hit 13 pull-ups to pass. That’s just the maximum. I’m certain the minimum in my PRMC was 5 but I’m unsure of the current minimum.

Keep up the hard work and keep us updated with your progress.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,521
Reaction score
18,077
Hate to say it as a matelot (sailor) rather than as as a Royal Marine, but as echoed above, never aim for minimums, always maximums to meet the standard for entry.

In my experience as a recruiter and analysing success statistics, the fitter the individual upon entry, the better they fare in achieving their goal.
 

Corona

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Mar 14, 2018
Posts
366
Reaction score
254
One of the FFL's first tests is as soon as you enter the gates you have to do 11 pull ups (give or take "it depends on the caporal-chef's mood", maybe that could be the first test by the train stop :D
 

Oden

Member
Joined
Sep 20, 2020
Posts
22
Reaction score
17
End of ROP RMFA with 2 attempts.
Its absolutely abhorrent.
I wonder if the average bloke joining now is way unfitter than someone lets say 20 years ago joining at the start of RT, again the "average" bloke.
 

Former AE

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Mar 22, 2015
Posts
419
Reaction score
1,019
It’s a mental attitude you have to have when walking through the gates, you have trained hard at home and now is the time to shine, you should aim for maximum never minimum. That should be your mantra throughout you career, always when times get tough remember the phrase “ You can’t crack me, I’m a rubber duck” it will help from those days in the gym and also the cold wet nights in the field. It pays to be a winner.
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,857
Reaction score
15,016
I wonder if the average bloke joining now is way unfitter than someone lets say 20 years ago joining at the start of RT, again the "average" bloke.

Back in the day there was no PRMC: "Don't worry about fitness before starting RT sonny. It's our job to make you fit."

The baseline start standard has definitely been raised but perhaps what actually matters is the conversion rate of those who begin RT to completing RT.

For example, in the 1950s candidates for Parachute Regiment were already Trained Ranks from other regiments. About 50% of those completed training. Those who didn't were returned to their units.

In the 1960s direct civilian entrants were permitted to join the Parachute Regiment. No PRAC back then; just interviews, medical examinations and issue of rail travel warrants to Depot Para. The pass rate remained at about 50%.

I understand that since the introduction of PRAC in the late 1980s (?) the pass rate is still about 50%. The numbers suggest that any improvements on the so-called conversion rate since the 1950s have been incremental at best.

If there are any statisticians on the forum please fell welcome to comment.

If ROP training is sub-maximal I'd speculate that a significant number of individuals who "fail" on phys are possibly seeing themselves off due to a deficit of mental resilience rather than a deficit of physical ability.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Jul 20, 2015
Posts
5,303
Reaction score
8,286
Back in the day there was no PRMC: "Don't worry about fitness before starting RT sonny. It's our job to make you fit."

The baseline start standard has definitely been raised but perhaps what actually matters is the conversion rate of those who begin RT to completing RT.

For example, in the 1950s candidates for Parachute Regiment were already Trained Ranks from other regiments. About 50% of those completed training. Those who didn't were returned to their units.

In the 1960s direct civilian entrants were permitted to join the Parachute Regiment. No PRAC back then; just interviews, medical examinations and issue of rail travel warrants to Depot Para. The pass rate remained at about 50%.

I understand that since the introduction of PRAC in the late 1980s (?) the pass rate is still about 50%. The numbers suggest that any improvements on the so-called conversion rate since the 1950s have been incremental at best.

If there are any statisticians on the forum please fell welcome to comment.

If ROP training is sub-maximal I'd speculate that a significant number of individuals who "fail" on phys are possibly seeing themselves off due to a deficit of mental resilience rather than a deficit of physical ability.
I heard exactly the same from old ex booties. No PRMC, etc.

I would say blokes were robuster, had hard working jobs and were mentally tougher.
I wouldn’t say blokes joining now are unfitter, just different fitness. People definitely look after themselves better, higher standards of living and less smoking, and a lot less drinking.
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,857
Reaction score
15,016
I would say blokes were robuster, had hard working jobs and were mentally tougher.
As one who joined as a Junior I'd ever only done a paper round but secondary schools were perhaps tougher environments. Routine, casual violence was dealt out by teaching staff in the class room. One fourteen-year-old lad in my class was belted across the back of his head with a massive Bible for gobbing off. He had blood coming out of one ear and we just shrugged because we thought he deserved it. It never crossed anyone's mind to report it.

I was thumped by teaching staff at school more than I was in adult RT. Looking back I deserved to be filled in to be fair. :)
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,521
Reaction score
18,077
As one who joined as a Junior I'd ever only done a paper round but secondary schools were perhaps tougher environments. Routine, casual violence was dealt out by teaching staff in the class room. One fourteen-year-old lad in my class was belted across the back of his head with a massive Bible for gobbing off. He had blood coming out of one ear and we just shrugged because we thought he deserved it. It never crossed anyone's mind to report it.

I was thumped by teaching staff at school more than I was in adult RT. Looking back I deserved to be filled in to be fair. :)
With so many blows to the head in your youth, it's a wonder you never considered joining the Army. No, wait... ;)
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,857
Reaction score
15,016
Ha, ha! A fair point.
I don't think my secondary school was unique in having a few teachers who appeared to be borderline unhinged.
 

TheRents

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Sep 5, 2017
Posts
375
Reaction score
892
I don't think my secondary school was unique in having a few teachers who appeared to be borderline unhinged.

Sounds familiar!

We had a woodwork teacher who would throw blocks of wood and the odd woodworking implent at kids

Needless to say, after a time, it was decided by the class on mass that a line had been crossed. So we waited until he was in the cellar cutting blocks on the table saw and at the crucial moment turned off the lights.:)

The language that erupted was probably akin to that used by the TT, but not a single thing was ever thrown at one of us again ......
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,857
Reaction score
15,016
Sounds familiar!
Pleased it's not only me!
One of my school's loons had been a conscientious objector during WW2. His moral position about inflicting harm on his fellow humans had clearly diluted by 1972 when he routinely lashed out at twelve-year-old pupils who could not properly conjugate French verbs.

But back on topic: I do think that many youngsters embarking on a service career in the 1960s and 1970s did so comfortable with the notion of being shouted at.
 

OddPikeFromCrimsonCity.

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Jan 14, 2021
Posts
246
Reaction score
284
Hello I have two questions I saw online that you cant choose what job you do in the royal marines you are just sent where ever they choose and at the begining of the year I weighed 120kg and as of this morning i weighed 86.6kg (for reference i am 5'10) should i loose more weight before I apply as I am not getting the full 13 pull ups previously required before the VPJFT
your BMI can not exceed 28 (there may be some exceptions to this maximum if your waist measures less than 94cm) You can use the NHS BMI calculator
 
Top