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Recommendations to stop legs seizing up on PRMC?

Discussion in 'Common Training Injuries' started by chefwhisky, Feb 14, 2020.

  1. chefwhisky

    chefwhisky New Member

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    Hi guys have you got any tips / recommendations to stop legs seizing up on bottom field / endurance course, Its something I've experienced day after a tough circuit at holding troop etc and want to prevent as much as possible on PRMC (R).

    Cheers lads.
     
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  2. A350-800

    A350-800 Valuable Contributor

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    I am not a fitness expert mate but my advice would be to practice lots of bodyweight circuits, exercises like box jumps, burpees, sled pushes and jump lunges should help, they have for me anyway. Best of luck with your upcoming Prmc
     
  3. Charlemagne

    Charlemagne New Member

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    Check out Arny's plan in the "Training Plans and Diet Suggestions" category, in particular the hill sprint workout. Plenty who swear by it!
     
  4. chefwhisky

    chefwhisky New Member

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    Yeah that's the current plan I am following, just with some adjustments etc.
     
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  5. Johnwayne

    Johnwayne Member

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    @chefwhisky , not sure what your stretching regime looks like, but I’d recommend you do so heavy stretching as well.
     
  6. chefwhisky

    chefwhisky New Member

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    Do you have any links to good stretching routines etc?

    Cheers mate.
     
  7. Johnwayne

    Johnwayne Member

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  8. Trooper149

    Trooper149 Valuable Contributor

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    Hey dude. A muscle cramp, is essentially an involuntary contraction. In your case, it is used as a safety measure to force you to stop using the muscle, as your nervous system perceives a risk of injury (because it is not conditioned enough). The way a muscle perceives "exercise" is through magnitude and volume of workload.

    If you significantly increase either of these, beyond what you are used to, you will start to cramp.

    In extreme cases (and you see this with footballers alot), they will go to perform a belter of a kick, and due to the sheer speed (magnitude) they kick at, their hamstrings are subject to a massive stretch (beyond what they are used to in training). Their hamstrings think "oh *text deleted*, we've never been stretched like this, time to contract so we don't stretch any further". In most cases, their leg will be returned to default position after the kick but in a small percentage of cases, the momentum of their leg kicking versus the auto-contractile strength of their hamstrings, causes the muscle to be pulled and in serious cases, torn.

    Bringing it back to you.

    Best thing you can is the following:
    -include some sessions which REALLY focus on the legs. On some sessions use heavy weights but with few reps, on other days go with light weights but lots of reps, this way you get both magnitude and volume into your training. This will condition your nervous system to overload and reduce the auto contractile response.
    -foam roll and stretch. Limited mobility and range of motion, can also be a trigger for the cramp response. Get yourself a foam roller and roll everything. 2 sets of 15 reps for all prime mover muscles. Stretch as well, I recommend the book "Beyond Stretching" by Pavel Tsatsouline. Its top knotch.
    -hydrate of course simply because hydration improves blood volume and plasma delivery to the muscle. If you dont hydrate, your muscles will not get the nutrients and blood volume they require to perform.

    And thats really it. Cramping is sort of mystified and alot of people refer to the whole sodium-potassium-electrolyte-drink-orange-juice fad that goes around. Just get a good diet.

    Bottom line, in my opinion, cramping is a reflex because your muscle and nervous system isnt used to the workload it is being subjected to. The way through this is to desensitise your nervous system intelligently via sessions which focus on magnitude and volume.
     
  9. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Eating a properly balanced meal before exercise is important. But even so, cramps can catch you out.

    I'm certainly not qualified to advise about nutrition so this is only an anecdotal observation:
    Had an attack of cramps once in a somewhat remote and inconvenient location. I was literally struggling to walk, which was a bit scary as I'd never experienced it before. I nibbled half a biscuit and all cramp symptoms vanished within about one minute.
     
  10. Trooper149

    Trooper149 Valuable Contributor

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    Yeah, a simple lack of sugar or stress can set off a cramp and in most cases, common sense prevails. Stretch, eat something, drink something and wait for it to ease off. I sometimes get cramps in my arches, but I just ease it off. Think its just footwear.

    I just get irritated when, people start talking about electrolyte-powders and shakes. Much of the time, it is just a gimmick, sold by a sub-par trainer.
     
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