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Respect and Leadership

Discussion in 'RM Officer questions' started by Bean97, May 7, 2018.

  1. Bean97

    Bean97 New Member

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    Hi all just had a couple of things that are on my mind that have been worrying me about becoming an officer.

    The first thing that worries me the most is gaining the respect of the lads. Especially those that have been on operations, I find it difficult to imagine how I could potentially be leading these guys who know way more about the job than me. It's been worrying me a lot and I am not sure if being an officer is for me if I have this thought in the back of my head ?

    I know I can lead, I have done it many times before in a variety of situations however I am worried about certain aspects of my character. What I mean by this is that I am quite a quiet bloke and am inclined to take the back seat on leadership tasks and I am worried that this is something I will struggle with at POC and AIB. Or even in my future as an Officer IF I even make it through especially when it comes to leading blokes who have operational experience as I don't want to come across as arrogant.

    Not really sure what exactly I am trying to say here but do you think that if I have these thoughts in the back of my mind that I am not suitable for the role of a YO.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    If you tend to take a back seat, then that's what the POC and AIB will identify and you probably won't make the start line.

    However if you do you will have 15 months of YO training, given by experienced NCOs before you pass out and join a Unit. Once there, you'll be guided by your Troop Sgt, will also have many years of experience, so any shortcomings will be identified long before you are let loose on around 30 or so Marines.

    There's only one real way to find out a about your insecurities and that's apply!

    Good luck

    Alan
     
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  3. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Only you can make that judgment. Self awareness and introspection are at the opposite end of the character spectrum from arrogance. Which leaves plenty of scope in the middle!

    Reading the diaries of blokes who have attended POC and AIB it is clear that confidence, being vocal and communicating effectively are crucial attributes.

    If someone is a weak swimmer he or she would address the shortcoming. Arguably the same approach applies to any other perceived deficit. Our characters are not cast in stone; we can develop them to meet, say, a particular job requirement.

    Consider thoroughly researching the roles of Officer and Other Rank. One is not intrinsically 'better' than the other but the roles are very different.

    But ultimately, as stated by @Caversham the only way you'll find out is by applying. Sometimes opportunities arise for potential YOs in the selection pipeline to attend acquaint courses at units where they get the chance to talk to YOs. Worth considering perhaps.
    Best of luck.
     
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  4. dodgyknees

    dodgyknees Active Member

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    Quiet and assured is good.

    Taking a back seat is not good.

    As to whether or not the guys will respect you, that is down to character. My experience is that you will be given the benefit of the doubt until you give them reason to think otherwise.

    You've got to want to lead, it is not easy. If you are not naturally inclined to take the lead, I would think carefully about embarking on a career that is the ultimate command task.
     
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  5. arny01

    arny01 Ex Pongo.

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    Leadership!! The first lesson I got as young JNCO, off my new Plt Sgt.

    “The best leaders, never have to lead”

    Although very simplistic, what he basically meant was if the guys respect you and want to work for you, leading them takes care of itself.
     
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  6. ThreadpigeonsAlpha

    ThreadpigeonsAlpha Royal Marines Commando

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    You are over thinking it. If you pass the POC AIB and RM training then you are good enough.

    Lads respect bosses for being themselves, we are all adult enough to realise that you aren’t there to be our best mates. We are all there for a job to do.

    And listen to your stripey, they are there for advice and have usually been around a long time.
     
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  7. cc1

    cc1 (former RM)

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    Taking the lead doesn't necessarily equate arrogance. People in difficulty crave leadership, and volunteering yourself for a life as a 'leader' is perpetual sacrifice to your subordinates.

    If you find putting yourself in positions of leadership challenging then I would re-visit leadership theory; in particular Action Centred Leadership, Mission Command and see how this ties in with the values / ethos of Officer life.

    There is a place for laissez-faire leadership, but it's a pretty exclusive market, and unless you have an absolute grasp of the intricacies you run the risk of being an abdicator, not a delegator.

    I'm not saying rule out your options as an Officer, but really think long and hard about the responsibilities of leadership and where you see yourself in relation to this.

    Putting yourself forward as a leader of men entails long hours and unenviable service to your people. The buck stops with you, and when called for, you take the steps out front and lead by example. That's the onus of responsibility. You will be trained to deal with it, but you must be comfortable with it.

    The guys will respect you if you act with integrity. If there's one thing I learnt doing 12 years as a Marine / JNCO it's that guys have a delicate nose for *text deleted*. They'll spot the push for a decent report a mile off, and they'll punish you for it... Rightly so...
     
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    Last edited: May 8, 2018
  8. Caversham

    Caversham Former RM Commando, Moderator

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    Applicable to every officer, WO, SNCO and JNCO. Without that element any leader is a waste of rations.

    Alan
     
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  9. m2013

    m2013 Well-Known Member

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    Ive had some bosses who clearly were sjar based and had 0 interest in the blokes and ive had others who genuinly cared and definitely commanded an aura of respect withot the need to shout etc.

    Same with jncos
    *text deleted* met lazy ones who were respected less than the average bod and others whod help out get.stuck in work parties rather than hands in pocket on phone while rank below graft.

    Ive been on courses where rank wont even sit on the same table as the lads at scoff. we may as well have been a different capbadge treat like strangers.

    Theres always *text deleted* be good and bad in any rank and sjar brown nosers etc

    Personally i will graft for someone who grafts for the blokes and i will do as little as i can for someone who is all the negatives i mentioned above
     
  10. Bean97

    Bean97 New Member

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    Thank you for all the replies, everything you have all said makes total sense and is very insightful - The only way for me to find this out will to give it a go.

    RT out the way!

    Hoping for 2019 batch :)
     
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