Revision Strategies/Techniques

DD

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I'm doing Government & Politics AQA Exam in about 4 weeks time and I still quite don't have a good technique for revising the stuff :worried: my current technique is to basically copy everything down from the textbook and praying it will sink in. I know a couple of you guys have done a levels, so what revision guide worked for you?
Cheers,
John.
 

Baron

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I didn't really master the art of 'revision' until my final year of University.

4 weeks is plenty of time to revise, so I'd personally not 'cram' yet, but spend 1-2 hours a day doing work for it. Write down a list of topics you need to learn, and have a 3 week plan detailing when and for how long you will spend on each. After the 3 weeks, start 'cramming' for 1 week, focusing on the topics you're least comfortable with, and 'going over' the stuff you're more familiar with to keep it in mind.

Also, I found a good way to learn was by answering past-paper questions. I'd initially attempt to answer them using just my brain. Then I'd research the question and answer it using my findings. Through this research I began to remember so much information. So much so, that in my 3rd year finals I could literally see my revision notes if I closed my eyes. Managed to average over 70% in these exams, so it worked for me!
 

Kentish

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Also, I found a good way to learn was by answering past-paper questions. I'd initially attempt to answer them using just my brain. Then I'd research the question and answer it using my findings. Through this research I began to remember so much information. So much so, that in my 3rd year finals I could literally see my revision notes if I closed my eyes. Managed to average over 70% in these exams, so it worked for me!
This. Ask your tutors for past papers, they should be able to dig plenty up. I find myself completely unable to absorb any further knowledge by copying notes or reading through multiple times. Try what Baron suggested, answer as much just using your own knowledge, then research the questions you cannot answer, then answer. Compare the completed paper to the answer paper (this is very important), and pay attention to what you were wrong on.
 

DD

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Cheers Baron and Kentish, I will definitely keep that in mind in the coming weeks with revision.
 
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Sotiris

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This. Ask your tutors for past papers, they should be able to dig plenty up. I find myself completely unable to absorb any further knowledge by copying notes or reading through multiple times. Try what Baron suggested, answer as much just using your own knowledge, then when research the questions you cannot answer, then answer. Compare the completed paper to the answer paper (this is very important), and pay attention to what you were wrong on.
Kentfish....:eek:
 

Red Bull

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I wouldnt say I'm good at revising. I'm really not. But maybe try putting post it notes around the house with short captions from the things you are less confident with. Like on your bedroom mirror if you have one, top of pc monitor. Etc. Keep changing them around every few days.

Just a thought :)
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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I'm not in any way a suitable person to take advice from (have an AS geology practical exam in 2 weeks and still only done 1 hour) but the one thing I do know works, despite what you may think, is videos.
At GCSE, the videos on bitesize were VERY useful for geography and secured me an A* (barely touched the books) and the one thing I've done so far for geol/geog this year is watch documentaries about our case studies. Low and behold, I could now write an essay on the case study which fits the mark scheme.
If your college/school doesn't have a video/images section online then use YouTube to see your case studies. Wouldn't recommend it for every subject though - the humanities & geology are very open-ended whereas others need to be kept strict to the syllabus.

In your case with govt/politics, there will be quite a lot of resources on the BBC website for example, which you can pick & choose from to fit your syllabus.
 

Janner

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This. Ask your tutors for past papers, they should be able to dig plenty up. I find myself completely unable to absorb any further knowledge by copying notes or reading through multiple times. Try what Baron suggested, answer as much just using your own knowledge, then research the questions you cannot answer, then answer. Compare the completed paper to the answer paper (this is very important), and pay attention to what you were wrong on.

Nail. Head. This has got me through nearly 4 years of an engineering degree.

Do the past papers over and over, if you get enough different past papers you should have a range of questions that cover the complete module.
 

DD

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Again, cheers guys for the advice, its much appreciated.
 

Mozdog

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but how'd the exam go?
 

DD

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Sorry to resurrect an old thread, but how'd the exam go?
It was alright, I did better on the second paper than the first one. I'm not to bothered about results day, I think I might do some resists in January.
 
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