RMR Medical

Discussion in 'RMR Section and RMR Selection' started by ic343, Jan 12, 2018.

  1. ic343

    ic343 New Member

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    Apologies in advance if this is posted in the wrong section

    I've been thinking about joining up with the RMR near the end of summer 2018 but have something bothering me. I've been clear of asthma and eczema (which I mildly had in the past) for around 4-5 years now with all symptoms being pretty much 100% gone. Thing is I only realised that I had to remove prescribed medications off my record from my GP to prove I was symptom free around two years ago- would this cause a problem? During your medical exam, do they only go off what is displayed on your records etc? Would appreciate if someone could shed some light here, thanks!
     
  2. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    You do not have to remove anything from your medical records, besides it's not permitted.

    Most people, when they recover from a condition do not go back to their GP to declare a condition is resolved, hence the reason for timelines after something is last treated.

    As long as you are 4-5 years free from requesting prescriptions or there are recurrent incidents, as indicated above and can also reach the required level on a peak flow meter together with being free from visible eczema, you should be ok.

    The only issues likely to be a problem are repeat steroidal treatments.
     
  3. ic343

    ic343 New Member

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    That's quite reassuring thanks. I think I worded it wrong the first time, what I meant was I asked my GP to cancel the prescriptions as I no longer needed them, he assessed me and agreed.
     
  4. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Careers Adviser

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    Yep, what you cannot do is request repeat prescriptions then retrospectively claim they weren't needed.

    Granted, if the last inhaler precribed is still sealed & unused, then possibly that one could be discounted but it would be unrealistic to claim precautionary prescriptions were repeatedly requested and not used because there would be no credible difference between a person claiming that and a person with ongoing issues requiring treatment
     
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  5. Chelonian

    Chelonian Well-Known Member

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    Just to emphasise the potential risk here, many repeat prescriptions continue needlessly for years. It shouldn't happen because one's need for meds should be reviewed regularly.

    But a particular problem can arise when a parent manages a child's meds and continues a prescription in good faith and 'just in case' the meds are needed for a condition that may actually have been resolved years earlier.
     
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