RMR v RM

B

butterfigers

Guest
is anyone able to give me insight on the difference between the quality of soldier of the reserves vs the regs for the marines. It seems there shouldn’t be much difference given that reserves have to pass everything to the same standard as their regular counterparts, but if someone could let me know that’d be very useful information.

Also is it true that there are a lot of opportunities for deployment with the reserves compared to the regs. From time to time I stumble upon posts about all the chances the reserves are getting and the blokes are spending loads of time on exercise and ops and with the regs it’s just pot luck. Would like to know if there is any truth to this?


Thanks in advanced!
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Jul 20, 2015
Posts
5,049
Reaction score
7,675
is anyone able to give me insight on the difference between the quality of soldier of the reserves vs the regs for the marines. It seems there shouldn’t be much difference given that reserves have to pass everything to the same standard as their regular counterparts, but if someone could let me know that’d be very useful information.

Also is it true that there are a lot of opportunities for deployment with the reserves compared to the regs. From time to time I stumble upon posts about all the chances the reserves are getting and the blokes are spending loads of time on exercise and ops and with the regs it’s just pot luck. Would like to know if there is any truth to this?


Thanks in advanced!

The PC answer is, they are identical. That’s what the politicians want to hear.

However they do have subtle differences.

It depends what you want to do? I don’t recommend RMR for anyone that hasn’t been regular. But that’s my opinion.

RMR don’t have time to mess around so all the training and time is utilised to get what needs done, done. A lot of RMR, and indeed any reserve unit is personality driven. You get good blokes that dig out and make it decent, and you get some lads that think it’s a drinking/shooting club. If your a good lad, then you will get on fine with regulars. With some banter.

The Regulars have time to spare, adjust, change or add onto or have last minute details. Depending on your hierarchy and how proactive you can be. You can achieve a lot of training, on unit and off unit. Easier to maintain your fitness aswell. Better educational opportunities.

Yes they both achieve the same standards, but one is doing it part time, the other full time. One will naturally have more skill degradation than the other.

It’s the other way around. And everything in the military is pot luck or right place right time. You are bound as a regular to your unit.
Reserves have a bit more flexibility. But now the operational tempo has slowed, there’s a less chances for Reserves, especially now because of the financial situation.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,356
Reaction score
17,479
The difference, wherever it may become apparent is probably more to do with currency or skill fade.

If you are not doing the job day to day, then you can quickly fall a bit behind with regard equipment, familiarity of associated drills and suchlike.

Whenever a Commando unit deploys, there is always a rear party, there will always be those on courses trade-related or for professional advancement, some taking odd-date leave, adventurous training, detachments deployed elswhere together with people who are not medically fit to deploy or need to be home for compassionate reasons.

Each unit deployment will usually have a few places offered up to Reservists who wish to deploy, often to fill gaps but also to keep the reserve element up to speed.

You'll not hear people complain about being left behind when they don't want to deploy but you WILL hear people drip like ten men when they view it as a Gucci deployment and feel "seen off" because they are not going and "less entitled" personnel are going instead.
 
B

butterfigers

Guest
The PC answer is, they are identical. That’s what the politicians want to hear.

However they do have subtle differences.

It depends what you want to do? I don’t recommend RMR for anyone that hasn’t been regular. But that’s my opinion.

RMR don’t have time to mess around so all the training and time is utilised to get what needs done, done. A lot of RMR, and indeed any reserve unit is personality driven. You get good blokes that dig out and make it decent, and you get some lads that think it’s a drinking/shooting club. If your a good lad, then you will get on fine with regulars. With some banter.

The Regulars have time to spare, adjust, change or add onto or have last minute details. Depending on your hierarchy and how proactive you can be. You can achieve a lot of training, on unit and off unit. Easier to maintain your fitness aswell. Better educational opportunities.

Yes they both achieve the same standards, but one is doing it part time, the other full time. One will naturally have more skill degradation than the other.

It’s the other way around. And everything in the military is pot luck or right place right time. You are bound as a regular to your unit.
Reserves have a bit more flexibility. But now the operational tempo has slowed, there’s a less chances for Reserves, especially now because of the financial situation.
Thank you very much for your reply and clearing up my questions, your response has taken a large amount of confusion off my shoulders and helped me tremendously!
 
B

butterfigers

Guest
The difference, wherever it may become apparent is probably more to do with currency or skill fade.

If you are not doing the job day to day, then you can quickly fall a bit behind with regard equipment, familiarity of associated drills and suchlike.

Whenever a Commando unit deploys, there is always a rear party, there will always be those on courses trade-related or for professional advancement, some taking odd-date leave, adventurous training, detachments deployed elswhere together with people who are not medically fit to deploy or need to be home for compassionate reasons.

Each unit deployment will usually have a few places offered up to Reservists who wish to deploy, often to fill gaps but also to keep the reserve element up to speed.

You'll not hear people complain about being left behind when they don't want to deploy but you WILL hear people drip like ten men when they view it as a Gucci deployment and feel "seen off" because they are not going and "less entitled" personnel are going instead.
Thank you very much for your reply, this is very informative and useful information!
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,459
Reaction score
14,158
Not really true though is it.

I stand by my comment. The OP specifically asked about "...the quality of soldier..." which is what I addressed in my response.

Clearly there will be differences in currency of training and other stuff as referenced by Ninja and TPA. It wouldn't be realistic to expect otherwise. But I'd argue that the fundamental quality of a Reserve Royal Marine is the equal of a Regular.

For the avoidance of doubt, my military background is not RM so my opinion is based on having worked with and employed Regulars and Reserves from the three services in a civilian capacity.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Jul 20, 2015
Posts
5,049
Reaction score
7,675
I stand by my comment. The OP specifically asked about "...the quality of soldier..." which is what I addressed in my response.

Clearly there will be differences in currency of training and other stuff as referenced by Ninja and TPA. It wouldn't be realistic to expect otherwise. But I'd argue that the fundamental quality of a Reserve Royal Marine is the equal of a Regular.

For the avoidance of doubt, my military background is not RM so my opinion is based on having worked with and employed Regulars and Reserves from the three services in a civilian capacity.

Commando Qualities are the same.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,356
Reaction score
17,479
Not really true though is it.
I doubt there's a Royal Marine Commando who has completed a minimum of 32 weeks recruit training, who would accept someone completing training on a part-time basis over a longer period of time was of the same quality as themself.

Similarly, I doubt a person who had undergone a RMR recruit training package over a year long, whilst undergoing further education or in a full time civilian job and culminating in the same commando tests, would claim to be any lesser mortal.

The criteria elements of training are the same, the difference is the manner in which they are achieved. I doubt either is easier to achieve than the other, for a variety of reasons. We get a fair few regular service recruits who quit recruit training and join the RMR in the mistaken assumption it's easier because they are at home and have longer recovery periods. Many of them fail to complete RMR training also.
 

ERFC

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Nov 17, 2014
Posts
887
Reaction score
532
I doubt there's a Royal Marine Commando who has completed a minimum of 32 weeks recruit training, who would accept someone completing training on a part-time basis over a longer period of time was of the same quality as themself.

Similarly, I doubt a person who had undergone a RMR recruit training package over a year long, whilst undergoing further education or in a full time civilian job and culminating in the same commando tests, would claim to be any lesser mortal.

The criteria elements of training are the same, the difference is the manner in which they are achieved. I doubt either is easier to achieve than the other, for a variety of reasons. We get a fair few regular service recruits who quit recruit training and join the RMR in the mistaken assumption it's easier because they are at home and have longer recovery periods. Many of them fail to complete RMR training also.

We had a couple of RMR lads join our troop for a fair few exercises during phase 2. Hardest part they said was your taught and shown a skill on the Wednesday once and then you’re expected to have perfected it by the weekend all in your own time. It’s not like training where you can constantly asks for extra tuition. I believe the onus is on the recruit to essentially practise the required skill and sought any snags they have out themselves and be expected to be competent when they’re tested at the weekend.
 

GreyWing

Nobody
Joined
Feb 21, 2007
Posts
5,699
Reaction score
4,244
One a funny note, one of the worst parts of the RMR for me was the transport away for a weekend. The coach driver would deliberately drive past popular bars in Manchester so we could just have a look at all the happy faces as we headed to freeze our nuts off. That was a morale sapper.

You don't get that in the regs surely :(

I'm probably with @ThreadpigeonsAlpha on it in that there is a PR answer and a realist answer to the question if we are just about talking skills and ability, just because of skill fade and time spent on systems learning them. If there wasn't, it wouldn't be the case that anyone wanting to join the regs would have to do the full course even if they had the green lid through the RMR.

I'm not going to say which is the easiest or hardest way of doing it. People in both are bloody nails. I'd say @Chelonian is also correct, the quality of the guy underneath isn't any different.
 

posh_punter

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Dec 1, 2016
Posts
240
Reaction score
143
In terms of current RMR deployments and opportunities, looking at the latest weekly orders on Defence Gateway there are opportunities being advertised to do a 12-24 month full-time stint at two of the commando units as well as go to the USA on an exchange programe.

Without going into too much detail, there are also requests for blokes to go and help with training foreign militaries in four different countries across Europe, Asia and Africa. A number of these are for Cpls and above, but still, there seems to be plenty on offer.

Oh and I forgot, they're also looking for someone from the RMR to be a chef on HMS Queen Elizabeth.... Not sure how much interest that'll get.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

Royal Marines Commando
Joined
Jul 20, 2015
Posts
5,049
Reaction score
7,675
In terms of current RMR deployments and opportunities, looking at the latest weekly orders on Defence Gateway there are opportunities being advertised to do a 12-24 month full-time stint at two of the commando units as well as go to the USA on an exchange programe.

Without going into too much detail, there are also requests for blokes to go and help with training foreign militaries in four different countries across Europe, Asia and Africa. A number of these are for Cpls and above, but still, there seems to be plenty on offer.

Oh and I forgot, they're also looking for someone from the RMR to be a chef on HMS Queen Elizabeth.... Not sure how much interest that'll get.

I wouldn’t mind serving old Betty some toad in the hole.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,356
Reaction score
17,479
Oh and I forgot, they're also looking for someone from the RMR to be a chef on HMS Queen Elizabeth.... Not sure how much interest that'll get.
An oppo is the Logistics WO1 on QNLZ, as seen on telly, explaining what a cake is to the Boss(below):






There are a fair few ex-RM Chefs who swapped over to the Navy when the RM Chef branch closed. When I visited HMS Queen Elizabeth last month, I met at least one Chef who was, I think, an ex-Ghurka SNCO.

If anyone fancies a global deployment on a mahoosive aircraft carrier and polishing-up on their culinary skills, there are certainly worse drafts to be had. There is also an RM contingent serving on board.

Traditionally RN Chefs also fly fast jets when off watch. At least that's what they tell people when they are on a foreign run ashore whilst serving on a carrier :)
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,459
Reaction score
14,158
I knew I'd seen some of those cake characters before. It's pleasing that they found new careers in the Royal Navy after the closure of Trumpton Fire Station. Aside from Jeremy Corbyn, of course.

trumpton.jpg

...I met at least one Chef who was, I think, an ex-Ghurka SNCO.

There's a fair chance that he is unique in not getting many complaints. :)
 

Chelonian

Moderator
Joined
Aug 10, 2010
Posts
11,459
Reaction score
14,158
You're right. He always smiles at 'customers', brandishing a kukri rather than a ladle.

It's all in the smile. When I did my RT in Aldershot back in the 1870s we were given a helpful briefing about the locally garrisoned Gurkhas we would inevitably bump into, either in town or while working.
Culturally, the Nepalese smile a lot socially and are generally very polite. Their 'casual' rig in town was a smart green blazer, black trousers and highly polished shoes. We were explicitly advised that such traits should not be interpreted as being signs of weakness as they were adept at rapidly switching between exquisite politeness and causing total mayhem. Top blokes.
 

Ninja_Stoker

Admin
Joined
Jul 10, 2007
Posts
35,356
Reaction score
17,479
It's all in the smile. When I did my RT in Aldershot back in the 1870s we were given a helpful briefing about the locally garrisoned Gurkhas we would inevitably bump into, either in town or while working.
Culturally, the Nepalese smile a lot socially and are generally very polite. Their 'casual' rig in town was a smart green blazer, black trousers and highly polished shoes. We were explicitly advised that such traits should not be interpreted as being signs of weakness as they were adept at rapidly switching between exquisite politeness and causing total mayhem. Top blokes.
Totally agree, huge respect. My oppo uses this guy as his bodyguard if anyone has any drips about scran. As you say, the smile is deceiving and they're brilliant warriors.
 

westy

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Apr 9, 2009
Posts
1,842
Reaction score
382
It's all in the smile. When I did my RT in Aldershot back in the 1870s we were given a helpful briefing about the locally garrisoned Gurkhas we would inevitably bump into, either in town or while working.
Culturally, the Nepalese smile a lot socially and are generally very polite. Their 'casual' rig in town was a smart green blazer, black trousers and highly polished shoes. We were explicitly advised that such traits should not be interpreted as being signs of weakness as they were adept at rapidly switching between exquisite politeness and causing total mayhem. Top blokes.

There used to be a Sergeant from 21 at the cook house in Malta Barracks in Aldershot, making sure you only had 1 sausage, 1 egg and 1 bacon!!
 
Similar threads



Top