Role of a Troop Commander and Troop Sergeant

George111

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I'm just doing some preparation ready for my sift interview. I am pretty clear on the role of a troop commander both on operations and in barracks but how does this compare/differ from that of your troop sergeant? In other words - what sets apart a troop commander from a troop sergeant and why is the former necessary if there is a perfectly capable troop sergeant?
 

DhobiWanKenobi

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Hi mate, whilst there are many who probably have a better idea than me, especially the serving Marines, I shall try to answer it anyway since I was thinking about the very same thing during the week.

The way I see it is whilst the troop Commander is like your boss at work, the troop Sergeant is probably more like your older brother or dad; experienced, wise, and there to help.

Even though Sergeants can take patrols out, I think the main difference is that a commissioned Officer has been trained in the legalities of war, Geneva Convention, etc.

I could be very wrong but would like to learn from this thread myself when some more experienced heads add to it!
 

Jbc

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Well given that a Troop Commander's posting is generally the very first posting a young Officer will get - the Trp Sgt generally mentors the YO through his first appointment.

On the ground the Tp Cdr's role is generally providing the link between HQ and his troop, making key tactical decisions that will not only affect the troop but also the broader picture. The Troop Commanders work with each other to ensure that the mission goes to plan, co-ordinating their relative sections within the grand scheme.

The Troop Sergeant's only real concern is ensuring his lads are delivering maximum violence upon the enemy when the time calls for it and dealing with the administration of his Troop: AmmoCas, Sitreps, Section QBO's, Section-level tactics etc.. etc..
 

George111

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Let?s look at a uniformed organisation which doesn't have officers - the UK Police force. Or perhaps more accurately, every policeman/woman is a police 'officer'. The police force has a rank structure, with the possibility of being fast tracked if you are good or have a university degree, but everyone who joins spends a period 'on the beat'.

In the South African Army (which undoubtedly has many problems) everyone starts as a private solider and then those with the necessary intellectual standard and have proved that they are the good enough are recommended for officer selection. And there is a similar process for 21/23 SAS.

Why is it so important that the British Army and Navy has Officers and other ranks which in the majority of cases start their career in that role and remain as an officer or other rank (respectively) throughout their career? Is it just an old fashioned system with its roots in the archaic British class system or is it advantageous to have a clear distinction between Officers and Other Ranks for the duration of both of their respective careers?
 

Chelonian

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Is it just an old fashioned system with its roots in the archaic British class system or is it advantageous to have a clear distinction between Officers and Other Ranks for the duration of both of their respective careers?
I cannot think of one example of a disciplined military service anywhere in the world that does not operate an Officer and Other Ranks hierarchy of command. This suggests that the system works whatever the reasons.

One may have expected the Soviet military of the twentieth century to have dispensed with the Officer class for ideological reasons but it did not. Remarkably, many conscript ranks did not receive even basic map reading and navigation training. Maps were often the sole preserve of the Officer and SNCO classes. One reason cited was that only politically accredited Officers and SNCOs could be trusted with maps.
 

George111

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Yes I can't think of any military who does not use that system either and it seems to be accepted as the best way of doing things. It would be interesting to know if the British military ever considered making everyone who joined first do a period as a private (or equivalent) solider from which you were recommended for Officer training. But the more I think about that option the more difficulties I can see!
 
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