ROP questions

Commando2912

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So with the new ROP programme now:
1• how does it work doing sub-maximal training ie what’s an example of a sub-maximal physical session you’ll do in ROP?

2• out of the first ROP course ran... what was the thing most people failed on I.e physical tests at the end of the 4 weeks or was it too difficult?

3•with the sub-maximal approach is there a definite reduction ininjuries/overuse injuries such as a common one like shin splints?

Cheers in advance to and reply’s!
 

anon1234

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3•with the sub-maximal approach is there a definite reduction ininjuries/overuse injuries such as a common one like shin splints?
Can't answer the first 2.

But question 3 is almost certainly going to be a retrospective analysis once a number of troops have gone through and passed out. Only then can they get a good sample size (number of people) to reasonably determine whether the rate of injury is decreasing prior to ROP and since ROP.

Equally, in that 4 week ROP perhaps there would be less in injuries than 4 weeks training. But wait till there's plenty of data to start answering that. It does make sense using graduated workloads to prevent injury, hopefully the numbers confirm that with less Rcts getting injured!
 

Commando2912

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Can't answer the first 2.

But question 3 is almost certainly going to be a retrospective analysis once a number of troops have gone through and passed out. Only then can they get a good sample size (number of people) to reasonably determine whether the rate of injury is decreasing prior to ROP and since ROP.

Equally, in that 4 week ROP perhaps there would be less in injuries than 4 weeks training. But wait till there's plenty of data to start answering that. It does make sense using graduated workloads to prevent injury, hopefully the numbers confirm that with less Rcts getting injured!
Thankyou mate!
 

Royal2010

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So with the new ROP programme now:
1• how does it work doing sub-maximal training ie what’s an example of a sub-maximal physical session you’ll do in ROP?

2• out of the first ROP course ran... what was the thing most people failed on I.e physical tests at the end of the 4 weeks or was it too difficult?

3•with the sub-maximal approach is there a definite reduction ininjuries/overuse injuries such as a common one like shin splints?

Cheers in advance to and reply’s!
From the little bits I know from the ROP the biggest attrition was due to self withdrawal and to 'not being for them'. Not sure as far as injuries go though. All in all the number of ranks that started week 1 day one was similar to a normal intake on the old programme.
Whether those ranks fair comparatively better still remains to be seen.

Side note: I was at the ROP this morning as I inspected a room and to my surprise, they were very good considering they have just started week 3. Lockers were VERY neat at a high standard of 'Globe and Laurelling' and notes had been written up from the previous weeks lessons.
Some excellent work is being done down at the ROP by the TT.
 

Langa please?

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From the little bits I know from the ROP the biggest attrition was due to self withdrawal and to 'not being for them'. Not sure as far as injuries go though. All in all the number of ranks that started week 1 day one was similar to a normal intake on the old programme.
Whether those ranks fair comparatively better still remains to be seen.

Side note: I was at the ROP this morning as I inspected a room and to my surprise, they were very good considering they have just started week 3. Lockers were VERY neat at a high standard of 'Globe and Laurelling' and notes had been written up from the previous weeks lessons.
Some excellent work is being done down at the ROP by the TT.
Do you think the ROP will lead to less withdrawals in RT, now recruits have had a taste of the lifestyle?

Is there a history of numbers dropping after the initial 28 days return of service which this may address before recruits begin week 1?
 

Royal2010

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Do you think the ROP will lead to less withdrawals in RT, now recruits have had a taste of the lifestyle?

Is there a history of numbers dropping after the initial 28 days return of service which this may address before recruits begin week 1?
Do I think the ROP will lead to fewer withdrawals in RT? Hopefully. It will definitely have an effect. One of the things a lot of ranks struggle within the early stages is getting all of their admin, cleaning, washing, ironing, folding to a high standard. The old way was to just thrash the living daylights out of the troop till they just got it. You ended up being exhausted after staying up all night and subsequently it started to have a knock-on effect for rifle lessons etc...
Having said that. A lot of withdrawals come from not liking the field exercises and stomping. It won't eradicate those withdrawals but it will reduce withdrawals of lads who are struggling to jump on the super sharp learning curve which happens at week 1.
 

Advocado

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Absolute agree with @Royal2010 about the ROP having a positive effect because it will enable lads to take on the core skills of admin easier and go into mainstream training with a head start.

However during my time at CTC as an instructor I found that one of the largest contributing factors to lads putting their chits in was they didn't actually realise what the job entails, this is definitely a recruiting error which needs addressing.

The corps sells itself through recruiting focusing on 'the challenge' of earning a green beret and the travel opportunities, so much so that lads genuinely rock up to the gate with a false picture in their mind that they are going to do 32 weeks of physical fitness training, assault courses, climbing ropes, the endurance course and maybe shoot some weapons along the way, earn a green beret and then they travel the world big timing it.

When faced with lessons on how to eliminate threats with absolute maximum aggression, whether that be in close quarters with a primary or secondary weapon system, a bayonet or even their bare hands, coupled with having to conduct themselves in a fully 'tactical' (easiest civilian translation is 'uncomfortable') manner in order to improve their own survivability, lads usually have the stark realisation that they are not just there to complete a challenge, they are starting a career where they may potentially be faced with kill or be killed situations and that reality leads to lads chitting, which is an absolute fair one if they are not keen for that. Best way to mitigate this is to change how the corps recruits lads.

If I had my way the corps adverts would be shown after the watershed and would have some scrapping footage from recent campaigns. Yes there are no large scale kinetic campaigns going on at present but it is by absolutely no means selling lads a lie because that is the job!
 

The guide

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While i agree to an extent, If you actually showed the realities of war and it's impact on individuals , they would likely be the death knell of the Corps and the Army would also have real issues, recruiting would drop! Being a "soldier" is a job / activity that has and is romanticised, from boys playing soldiers in the woods to main stream medieval Hollywood films!..Commandos even more so, very few guys put the chit in because the think about war, it tends to be boredom / stagnation , and doing the same thing continuously for little perceived benifit
 

Man of Steel

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Absolute agree with @Royal2010 about the ROP having a positive effect because it will enable lads to take on the core skills of admin easier and go into mainstream training with a head start.

However during my time at CTC as an instructor I found that one of the largest contributing factors to lads putting their chits in was they didn't actually realise what the job entails, this is definitely a recruiting error which needs addressing.

The corps sells itself through recruiting focusing on 'the challenge' of earning a green beret and the travel opportunities, so much so that lads genuinely rock up to the gate with a false picture in their mind that they are going to do 32 weeks of physical fitness training, assault courses, climbing ropes, the endurance course and maybe shoot some weapons along the way, earn a green beret and then they travel the world big timing it.

When faced with lessons on how to eliminate threats with absolute maximum aggression, whether that be in close quarters with a primary or secondary weapon system, a bayonet or even their bare hands, coupled with having to conduct themselves in a fully 'tactical' (easiest civilian translation is 'uncomfortable') manner in order to improve their own survivability, lads usually have the stark realisation that they are not just there to complete a challenge, they are starting a career where they may potentially be faced with kill or be killed situations and that reality leads to lads chitting, which is an absolute fair one if they are not keen for that. Best way to mitigate this is to change how the corps recruits lads.

If I had my way the corps adverts would be shown after the watershed and would have some scrapping footage from recent campaigns. Yes there are no large scale kinetic campaigns going on at present but it is by absolutely no means selling lads a lie because that is the job!
I completely agree with the above statement, but statistically speaking, is there an age range that you likely see the most people throw their chits in? As an older gent and joining the RMR, I know exactly what I am getting myself into, where my former younger self wouldn't have had a clue. Having read your post, the more you explained the nit and grit, the more motivated/pumped I was getting about joining.

I think it's a difficult balance to strike when publicly releasing information about the reality of being in the military, as at the end of the day, you are trained to kill and most perhaps younger civilians may not have an appreciation for this.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Interestingly, during the Herrick years, when it was not uncommon to go from King's Squad to unit to Afghanistan in pretty short order, there were a few trained ranks that were quite taken aback when they experienced life at the sharp end.

Recruit Training was adapted to incorporate 'lessons learnt' from the Frontline. One such element was graphic briefings on the Realities of Combat and this led to an increase in voluntary withdrawals from training when it dawned on people that this wasn't a game.

Far rather they found this out prior to joining a fighting unit & deploying.
 

Chelonian

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Slightly off topic but have they updated the instructional film about sexually transmitted diseases? Asking for a friend, obvs.

In the 1970s many instructional films had been filmed in black and white. But the STD film was in glorious technicolour. Only saw half of it because the projector bulb melted a hole in the film reel. :)
 
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