Royal Marines Commando 32 Week Recruit Training Programme

TheGeek

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After reading on here about nods falling asleep as their family drive them out of the gates, I don't think I'd risk it. Just nap on the choochoo.

Geek
 

Mr D

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There are quite possibly a few r&r that are applied in RT to recruits but for the reasons eluded to by Ninja,they make total sense,after all it's a few quid and a few hours..
 

James.H

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@Ninjastoker Can i confirm that the training programme you posted in 2013 is the same as the one used now? Got my interview fairly soon with a bit of luck!
 

Ninja_Stoker

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The modules are the same, the sequence/type of exercises may alter from troop to troop depending on asset availability, etc.
 

Robin

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Hi ninja_stoker, do you have the training program for the RMR?
 

Mumofthree

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For the families of those about to enter into recruit training and those already in recruit training there's an excellent week-by-week series of video clips on the RN website which gives an insight of the each of the full 32 weeks training at the Commando Training Centre. Bear in mind, certain elements of training maybe adjusted from time to time, but coupled with the programme below, it gives a good insight: http://webarchive.nationalarchives....M-Commando-Training-Phase-1-CTCRM?week=week-1

Weekends off highlighted in blue.

Annual Leave is usually 2 weeks in December, 2 in March & 3 in August. Recruit Training is paused during these periods. Latest predicted leave dates here; http://www.royalmarines.uk/threads/forecast-leave-dates.43737/

Week 1 Foundation
The Start, The realisation that there are two five o'clocks per day.
o Joining Routine
o Gym and Swimming Assessment
o Kit Issue
o Mathematics and English Tests
o Admin
o Drill and Physical Training

Location: Lympstone Commando Training Centre

Week 2 Foundation

First introduction to field conditions:
o Exercise First Step (Overnight in the field)
o Drill Physical Training
o Personal Admin
o Close Quarter Combat.

For many the realisation that the life of a Marine is predominently spent outdoors, begins to strike home. If it's wet or snowing, this is where people may start having second thoughts - push through it.

Location: Lympstone Commando Training Centre & Woodbury Common.

Week 3 Foundation
Tactics and weapons training:
o Weapon Training
o Drill
o Physical Training
You've now morphed into a half-man, half ironing board mutant - but a smart one at that.
Location: Lympstone Commando Training Centre

Week 4 Individual Skills
More tests:
o Weapon Training
o Physical Training & Swim
o Drill & Corps History
o Exercise Early Knight (First armed field exercise at night)
Location: Lympstone Commando Training Centre

Week 5 Individual Skills

Camp and field week:
o Weapon Training (including Weapon Handling Tests)
o Physical Training & Runs
o Map Reading
o Exercise Quick Cover (3 day exercise including Basic Fieldcraft and Close Quarter Battle)
This is the first opt-out point & there will be a few quitters. Avoid the "Lemming Effect" and crack-on. Those that leave at this point can generally expect a 12-24 month wait before getting the opportunity to re-join.
o Families Day
Location: Lympstone Commando Training Centre & Woodbury Common.
Long Weekend Leave

Week 6 Individual Skills

The recruits' basic shooting skills are perfected:
o First Aid
o Rifle Shoot
o Physical Training
o Map Reading
Location: Lympstone Commando Training Centre & 40 Cdo

Week 7 Individual Skills

A week in the field introducing more basic infantry skills:
o Exercise Marshall Star (3 1/2 Day Exercise) covers Basic Fieldcraft & Soldiering Skills (including Obstacle Crossing)
o Close Quarter Combat
Location: Woodbury Common.

Week 8 Individual Skills

Introduction to Survival Training:
o Drill
o Physical Training
o Map Reading
o First Aid and Survival Training

Location; CTC & Stallcombe Wood

Week 9 Individual Skills

Weapons training, and an introduction to education qualifications:

o Drill
o Physical Training & Gym pass out.
o Map reading
o First Aid Exam
o Light Support Weapon (LSW) Training and Shoot.
o NVQ & Key Skills start
Location; CTC

Week 10 Individual Skills

Navigation and survival training:
o Exercise Hunter's Moon (4 day exercise) Fieldcraft
o Navigation Training,
o Map Reading
o Survival Exercise
Location; Dartmoor & Gileigh
Long Weekend Leave

Week 11 Advanced Skills

Recruits must pass the next two weeks to continue their training:
o Live Firing: Rifle elementary application to Annual Personal Weapons Test (Combat Infantryman) (also Computer Simulations Shoots)
Location; Straight Point Range

Week 12 Advanced Skills

Shooting training is crucial if recruits are to pass on to continue their training:
o Light Support Weapon Auto Shoot: LSW Annual Personal Weapons Assessment (Moving Targets/Night Sights)
Location; Straight Point Range

Week 13 Advanced Skills

Communication and CBRN training start this week:
o Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear (CBRN) Training
o Comms Training Starts
o Grenade throwing
o Helicopter & Underwater Escape Drills
Location; Woodbury Common, RNAS Yeovilton

Week 14 Advanced Skills

Time to perfect navigation and field skills ready for Exercise Baptist Run next week:
o CBRN
o Radios
o Exercise Running Man (3 day exercise) mainly Navigation Training (Yomping)
o Fit Lovats & Blues Uniforms
Location; CTC & Woodbury Common

Week 15 Advanced Skills

A major exercise this week tests all the core military skills required of a Royal Marine. All recruits must successfully complete this exercise to continue training:
o Individual Skills Revision
o Exercise Baptist Run (2 day field test exercise)-to test all skills taught in phase 1- includes stalking, kit inspections, map reading, CBRN and signal tests.
o First drill inspection, arms drill pass out and phase 1 pass out parade
Location; CTC & Woodbury Common
Long Weekend Leave

Week 16 Operations of War module

Training picks up intensity, with an emphasis on perfecting Infantry skills:
o VHF radio procedure training
o Battle physical training
o 51mm mortar training
o Tactics package starts
o Battlefield tour
Location; CTC & France

Week 17 Operations of War module

Soldiering skills and tactical training are honed and perfected:
o Exercise First Base Tactical field patrols race
o Observation posts and harbour drills
Location; Perridge Estate

Week 18 Operations of War module

Patrol and tactical understanding is perfected:
o Exercise Second Empire section and troop level attacks
o Troop fighting patrols and ambushes
Location: Woodbury Common

Week 19 Operations of War module

A combination of weapon and adventure training:
o General purpose machine gun (GPMG) training
o R & I/ Adventure training
o Battle physical training
Location; CTC & Cornwall

Week 20 Operations of War module

The multi-terrain vehicle (the Viking) is introduced to recruits, and tactical training is completed:
o Exercise Viking Warrior (Troop level patrolling exercise)
o Including Viking training package
Location: Bovington Camp & training areas.

Week 21 Operations of War module

This week includes weapons training and battlefield tactics lectures:
o Battle physical training
o General Purpose Machine Gun (GPMG) training
o Defence lectures and CBRN
Location; CTC

Week 22 Operations of War module

More patrolling skills are taught, as well as fighting in woods and forests (FIWAF):
o Battle Physical training pass out
o Operating in Built-up Areas and Close Quarter Battle Skills Including patrolling
o FIWAF
o Dig & defence
o CBRN
Location; Sennybridge

Week 23 Operations of War module

Operations in Built-up Areas and Close Quarter Battle Skills (OBUA AND CQB) is taught and practiced:
o Operations in Built-up Areas and Close Quarter Battle Skills (OBUA AND CQB) exercise
Location; Sennybridge
Long weekend Leave

Week 24 Operations of War module

More weaponry training, and an Endurance Course acquaint:
o Minimi light machine gun (LGM) training,
o Endurance course acquaint,
o Key skills period ends
Location: CTC

Week 25 Operations of War module

Amphibious training:
o 12 mile load carry
o Amphibious training
o Minimi LMG firing (AWA)
o Sea safety training
o Visit RM museum

Location; Poole Areas & Portsmouth

Week 26 Commando Course

Climbing and mountain skills are practiced and the Final exercise begins:
o 6 Mile speed march,
o Cliff assault & rope techniques,
o Water obstacle crossing,
o Tarzan assault course acquaint
o Final Exercise starts
This is the last opt-out point after this week you'll hopefully complete RT, give 2.5 years return of service before being eligible to submit 12 months notice. Those not sure about their intentions ('War dodgers') leave at this point. With hindsight, having got this far, most bitterly regret leaving.
Location; CTC, Foggin Tor, SW England

Week 27 Commando Course

Final Exercise is designed to prove a high standard of professional skills and tactical understanding and recruits must successfully complete this in order to continue training. This is the turning point - if you pass this, you're extremely unlucky not to successfully pass out:
o Final Exercise ends
o Specialisations brief
Location: SW England, CTC
Long Weekend Leave

Week 28 Commando Course

Training and an intensive physical workout on the Tarzan Assault Course
o European computer driving licence (ECDL) computing
o Tarzan Assault and Endurance course run-throughs
o Drill
Location; CTC, Woodbury Common, Bicton college

Week 29 Commando Course

Live fire tactical training:
o Field Firing Exercise 1 (Individual and Fire team level Live Firing)
Location; Dartmoor

Week 30 Commando Course

o Field Firing Exercise 2 (Section & Troop level Field Firing)
o Endurance course pass out
Location; Dartmoor, Woodbury Common, CTC

Week 31 Commando Course

This is the Commando test week where all the core criteria to becoming a Royal Marine Commando are tested:
o Commando Tests (9 mile speed march, Tarzan & assault course, 30 miler, Endurance course)
o ECDL Computing
o Drill
Location; CTC, Woodbury Common, Dartmoor & Bicton College

Week 32 Kings Squad Pass Out Week

In this final week of training, recruits celebrate their transition to Royal Marine Commandos:
o King's Squad Pass Out Parade
o Leaving admin
Location; CTC.
@rdm73 these are the proposed details for training but as I understand it there is some alterations made as required with each individual troop based on their achievements.

P.s. you need details only for troop 253 not 254 unless your nod changes troop.
 

Mr D

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The Commando phase has changed quite a bit now,same content just different weeks, most significant change being Final Ex now ends wk 30 so its straight off FE into test week.
 

doggle

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I wonder why it was changed so that lads are straight off final ex then onto the tests? By all accounts it's a really tough exercise and they're exhausted before they start test week with basically no time to recover.
 

Caversham

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I wonder why it was changed so that lads are straight off final ex then onto the tests? By all accounts it's a really tough exercise and they're exhausted before they start test week with basically no time to recover.
That's the general idea. It really is a test of resolve. So even if a Nod fails Final Ex they have to go straight into Test Week after redoing the exercise.

I will say that tests themselves are not unduly hard. What makes them difficult is they are at the end of 32 weeks of extremely hard training and at the finish of one of the hardest exercises in the programme. The good bit is that all the Nods know that all that is standing between them and their CGB is these four tests.

Alan
 

doggle

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Thanks, @Caversham, I understand that - I was wondering why final ex hasn't always been directly before the tests - as you say, it's a real test of resolve - and the reasoning behind the change in the training programme. Cheers.
 

Caversham

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Thanks, @Caversham, I understand that - I was wondering why final ex hasn't always been directly before the tests - as you say, it's a real test of resolve - and the reasoning behind the change in the training programme. Cheers.
When I went through training, the final ex was the first week of the CC, which gave you around four weeks to get over before starting the tests. Although I passed the ex, I picked up a knee injury which saw me being back trooped for around 8 weeks. Once recovered and fit enough I re-commenced training at the point I left off. On today's policy I would have had to redo the exercise! :(

Alan
 

arny01

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I wonder why it was changed so that lads are straight off final ex then onto the tests? By all accounts it's a really tough exercise and they're exhausted before they start test week with basically no time to recover.
Yep as Alan says, the idea is to get the recuit to the tests physically and mentally exhausted!! Although not a Marine myself I can absolutely say after going down to see my son after his Final Ex that he was indeed exhausted!! But very very fit, and very very mentality strong too.

Rest assured if your lad is at the test stage of training he has what it takes. Just needs a smidge of luck.
 

westy

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When I went through training, the final ex was the first week of the CC, which gave you around four weeks to get over before starting the tests. Although I passed the ex, I picked up a knee injury which saw me being back trooped for around 8 weeks. Once recovered and fit enough I re-commenced training at the point I left off. On today's policy I would have had to redo the exercise! :(

Alan
And I thought it was meant to be harder in your day:eek:
 

Caversham

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And I thought it was meant to be harder in your day:eek:
Depends who you listen to! Other sites are full of "old and bold" making exactly that claim! My personal view is a mixed one.

Myself and others of my time have asked that question and it leads to lively debate! My view is that I don't think I would have made the start line for RT. I was 9st 10lb on entry, which equates to around 62 kg, so would have needed to gain weight by today's standards. Secondly, I had a knee injury as a child, which I guess would have made me TMU whilst it was investigated.

There was no PRMC prior to entry, so when I asked what I should do to prepare, I was told not to bother, as that was "their job". The first few sessions in the gym at Deal was horrendous and did see a few heading for the gate, but I was not one of them.

Training length was around the same, although it had been reduced from 36 weeks just before I joined. Tactics and weapons were different, but the beastings were the same and I'm pleased to see that the TTs of today are more supportive and encouraging. There was no carrot and stick for us, just stick!

Our Squad/Troop Sgt was a KB with 4 years service in. When he passed out he was loaded straight onto a JCC which he passed with distinction and was promoted to Cpl, all before he joined his first Unit. The next three years were spent on courses before us being his first Troop as a Sgt. He demanded high standards, which we failed miserably to achieve! However, the exercises were similar and the commando tests were the same.

The big difference that I feel that we had and I have mentioned it before, was the kit was absolute crap back then. We had no sleeping bags or roll mats and I went through RT during the winter, when winters WERE more colder than now. Our boots were awful and constantly fell to bits. For ankle support we had WW1 puttees! And to keep dry we had a WW1 gas cape for when it was raining, which when joined together with cord made a double bivvy. The problem was that if it was raining, you had to take it off to make the bivvy, so you got soaked through, which rather defeated the objective! The good kit was the 7.62 SLR and the GPMG, so not all bad and the weight for load carries were around the same.

So all in all, who knows what is the hardest, but the one thing I did have, along with others, was the determination to get the CGB on my head, which I did!

Alan
 

westy

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Depends who you listen to! Other sites are full of "old and bold" making exactly that claim! My personal view is a mixed one.

Myself and others of my time have asked that question and it leads to lively debate! My view is that I don't think I would have made the start line for RT. I was 9st 10lb on entry, which equates to around 62 kg, so would have needed to gain weight by today's standards. Secondly, I had a knee injury as a child, which I guess would have made me TMU whilst it was investigated.

There was no PRMC prior to entry, so when I asked what I should do to prepare, I was told not to bother, as that was "their job". The first few sessions in the gym at Deal was horrendous and did see a few heading for the gate, but I was not one of them.

Training length was around the same, although it had been reduced from 36 weeks just before I joined. Tactics and weapons were different, but the beastings were the same and I'm pleased to see that the TTs of today are more supportive and encouraging. There was no carrot and stick for us, just stick!

Our Squad/Troop Sgt was a KB with 4 years service in. When he passed out he was loaded straight onto a JCC which he passed with distinction and was promoted to Cpl, all before he joined his first Unit. The next three years were spent on courses before us being his first Troop as a Sgt. He demanded high standards, which we failed miserably to achieve! However, the exercises were similar and the commando tests were the same.

The big difference that I feel that we had and I have mentioned it before, was the kit was absolute crap back then. We had no sleeping bags or roll mats and I went through RT during the winter, when winters WERE more colder than now. Our boots were awful and constantly fell to bits. For ankle support we had WW1 puttees! And to keep dry we had a WW1 gas cape for when it was raining, which when joined together with cord made a double bivvy. The problem was that if it was raining, you had to take it off to make the bivvy, so you got soaked through, which rather defeated the objective! The good kit was the 7.62 SLR and the GPMG, so not all bad and the weight for load carries were around the same.

So all in all, who knows what is the hardest, but the one thing I did have, along with others, was the determination to get the CGB on my head, which I did!

Alan
I suppose when I comes down to it, determination is probably the biggest motivator when it comes to earning a CGB
 

Caversham

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I suppose when I comes down to it, determination is probably the biggest motivator when it comes to earning a CGB
Absolutely! You can do all the fitness training imaginable, but the biggest test is really how much you want it.

This is especially relevant on a winter's night on Dartmoor, when you are carrying the contents of your locker on your back and you are cold beyond belief and soaked through and you have several more of the same to endure.

Guys consistently post how many press ups/pull ups/sit ups they can do, which is great, but the biggest test is living and operating in the field in all conditions.

It really is a State of Mind!

Alan
 

westy

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Many things change, spot the differences.....

SANGIN.jpeg

9 Trp C Company 40 Cdo. Tebadu 65..JPG
Very little has changed except upgraded weapons and kit

I remember reading about the battle of Mirbat and I believe it was Andy McNab who said that in those days they fought in just shorts and boots and no other kit
 
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