Running Tips for a Newbie

Discussion in 'Training Methods and Diet Suggestions' started by Eafy, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Eafy

    Eafy New Member

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    Afternoon gents.

    After not doing any cardio for about six months due to deciding to focus on weightlifting, before I decided I wanted to go for the RMR, does anyone have any tips for a running newbie? Should I be focusing on running 3 miles at a slow pace that allows me to hold a conversation and gradually getting faster, or focus on trying to run at the required pace to finish 3 miles at the BFT pace and just stopping when my lungs won't allow me to carry on?

    I'm planning on doing 3 days (Monday, Wednesday, Friday) in the gym focusing specifically on the 3 mile run then go into gainers for the pull/push/sit-ups - and 2 days (Tuesday, Thursday) following the Fintan workout - allowing myself two rest days over the weekend.

    Any input would be much appreciated - especially from some of you who may have come from a cardio-hating background like myself!

    Cheers.
     
  2. Nathan100101

    Nathan100101 Member

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    I do ...

    1 x 3 miler (sub 21 mins)
    1x 6 miler (sub 42-45 mins)
    1x pjft or Hill sprints (alternate per week)

    Throw in a bleep test, bft or fartleck every now and again.

    Hope that helps to give you some ideas.
     
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  3. A350-800

    A350-800 Member

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    Hello :)

    Hopefully I can be of some help here, its really good you started this thread because there are loads of things I wish I knew before I started running that would have helped me now and made things easier. Running was one of the only things I was good at and made me really happy, and I got really into it. I managed to get selected for a few county teams but despite this I now realise I was not a particularly wise runner, had some terrible flexibility and strength issues and was not planning my training sensibly, despite setting good times. Overall, my fitness ability in balance was poor. I couldn't even stand on one leg without falling over. I guess the corporals and PTs at CTC are just interested in one being able to comfortably achieve the fitness tests and be good at strength and flexibility than they are about being able to run 800m in such and such a time etc. This is not an exhaustive list but these things are helping me become more balanced in my training (you are likely doing some of these anyway);

    Foam roller

    These are good for a quick soft tissue massage, you can fit in a 5 minute session at a lunch break etc, they make you feel a bit looser. Alternatively a hockey ball for soft tissue release is quite painful but effective.

    Stretches

    Some people find these vital for training, others see no benefit. Its important to do what is best for you obviously. Active stretching is something that has really helped me, using a theraband to increase my frankly abysmal range of motion. perhaps consider pilates, i know it sounds funny but it does help increase core strength and stability.

    Only gradually increase mileage

    10 percent increase per week maximum :) Please plan your training, not like me and just head out for a run because of a bad day. Cross training like swimming and cycling are great to mix in on alternate days to running

    Running specific strength training

    This is really important. if one doesn't have time for injury prevention one must have time for injuries unfortunately; I didn't put any emphasis on strength work in my training and just focused on mileage and times, which ultimately isn't really that important. Running specific glute work and hamstring exercises, like glute bridges, kettle bell lunges and single leg balance work are helpful. You are probably really strong anyway with all your lifting but these could help in addition

    Shoes

    Make sure they are the right type for you (I was running for a decade and was running in a stability shoes unsuitable for me), and that they aren't too worn. Perhaps go for a gait analysis to make sure.

    Road surface

    Try to mix things up a bit. Concrete and tarmac if run on too much can case issues like shin splints, and excessive camber in the road can cause knee issues and hip problems. Perhaps swap sides of the road occasionally to minimise this effect

    Hill sprints

    Great for cardiovascular and strength, as well as good for technique, but be careful at first as the calves and achilles have to work very hard as you push uphill

    Thanks, I wish you the best with your training :)
     
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  4. Eafy

    Eafy New Member

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    Thanks for this, but coming from someone who hasn't done any cardio in a long time - would this not be "too much, too soon"?

    This is really good information, covers all bases, thank you! Got a gait analysis done just before I started again and the difference in how my body felt just by changing my current shoes for some with more stability was like night and day - my legs just don't stop!

    With regards to stretching - I never did anything when I was weightlifting as I didn't feel the need to, but by now doing cardio, I've realised just how important it is!
     
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  5. DBenn01

    DBenn01 Active Member

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    The advice above is good advice. What Nathan says above is spot on, my point being you need to do more than the 3miler. If you are only just getting into it, obviously take it slow.

    You can do your 3miler of course, but add in at least sprinting intervals. They will do you good, trust me. Find yourself a good long stretch, sprint for 20sec, do that ten times. Rest between for a minute, do some stretches, keep limber, squat, lunge a few times, grab a sip of water, get back onto the next rep. The squats, lunges, maybe a few calf raises, and stretches during your rests are paramount. You need to keep your legs loose and oiled up! Or theyll tense up, slow down or youll pull a muscle - i pulled my hammy. (No pun intended!)

    As above make sure your shoes are good, and not bigger than your feet! Start the sprint slow and increase the speed, train yourself to run slow then be running the fastest at the end of the distance.

    This sprinting, as a bare minimum extra to your 3miler, will help a lot, because it is more intense of course, but your body will handle it. Its faster and more intense, but its not "too much". You need to vary your intensity so your body can adapt. It will skyrocket your cv fitness, and make your legs more agile and make your muscles shoot harder. Dont neglect your squats! Get your glutes going, they are there for fast running.

    You can also have a whack at a Fintan Circuit. I wont spoil it, just try to enjoy it ;) if you need to tailor it, or the 10x20sec sprints, do so until you can do it, and then increase to 40sec or whatever you feel necessary.

    Hill sprints are important. Find yourself a good hill and do your best. Take it slow, one or two lengths until you can keep going.

    Anyways, whatever you do, keep it simple, be specific, and listen to your body. But never stop! Until the end, keep going. Your mind has to work harder than your body, because your body will want to do all kinds of lovely things, but never stop, slow down yeah, but never let your mind say stop. Listen to your mind more than your body.
     
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  6. DBenn01

    DBenn01 Active Member

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    Regarding the bleep test that i love so much, what is helping a lot here is doing a version of it, laid out over 10 metres. It should take 20 minutes in total. One the first minute, pace it slowly and do 1 lemgth. Rest for the remainder. 2nd minute, 2 lengths. Rest for the remainder. 3rd minute, 3 lengths, rest, and so on until you either are running non stop with no rest, face plant, soil yourself (although technically you should keep going), or cough up a lung.

    Seriously though, mind yourself with it, and make sure you take it slow to begin with. If you miss your line, end the exercise and take another chunk out of it next time.

    Hope all of that helps!
     
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  7. Nathan100101

    Nathan100101 Member

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    Yeah don't jump in and start trying to smash these distances and times.

    Tailor a plan to your current level of fitness. Keep at it and build slowly.
     
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  8. john lewis

    john lewis Well-Known Member

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    If you're just starting you looked at couch to 5k?
     
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  9. Eafy

    Eafy New Member

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    Only just checked it out.

    Just set myself a goal this week of doing 5k a day, starting at a really slow 9km/h and adding an extra 0.1km/h onto the speed each day. Once I reach a reasonable 5k time (Probably around 27 minutes?) I'll start adding in speed work with the Fintan circuit.
     
  10. john lewis

    john lewis Well-Known Member

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    3x a week should be enough to begin with
     

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