Share Dealing

Baron

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Does anyone on here play the markets?

When I was in College, after my 18th, I thought I'd throw a hundred quid at a company, and ended up walking away with a decent profit once I'd sold the shares..

Currently looking to get back in to it, I figure with interest rates so low, and it being the perfect time to buy share prices low, there is money to be made.

I'm looking at a company called DTZ Holdings, and I've been following them for a bit after a tip. They look pretty solid, and in the past the share prices have been on average over ?1, and just before the property markets collapsed, they were valued at ?8.35 a share! At the moment, can pick them up for around 60pence, and I think that's an absolute bargain.

Just worked it out, if you put in ?100, and they returned to ?8.35 again, then you stand to walk away with ?1290 profit, not bad ey!

I'd also recommend looking into Faroe Petroleum, J Sainsbury and RBS.

Rick
 

Morts

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Looks like you could get some pure dosh there
 
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It definitely something I'd like to get into when I'm older just a little extra to augment my wage from the RMs hopefully. I'm taking Economics next year and was fascinated in the taster lesson I had, the mental challenge and risk playing the stock markets would provide really appeals to me, I'd like to see if I have a knack for it or not. In my 6th Form the teachers have introduced a fantasy league type thing into Business lessons were you have ?100,000 (imaginary) to invest, I'll find out if I'm any good and if not its a break from text books anyway.
 

Kentish

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A couple of my close mates in sixth form got into this, for ages it would make me laugh watching them having heated discussions over the phone and looking anxious, then i found out they made some fair dollar, i took back all that laughing.

It's a hard market to play, and as always, you'll win some, you'll loose some. I've been very tempted to do it, but decided to steer clear.

Good luck.
 

SPage

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I put 500 quid into one company and 160 into another. Currently I am breaking just about even but the company that is currently down just got a good solid contract sorted so the price should start rising nicely.

I'm now looking at a company called Blinkx. I reckon they are on their way up.

I was going to invest in Rockhopper at one point as well but didn't have any cash at the time. Cue them finding oil in the Falklands about a month later and their price rocketing :sad2:
 

Baron

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I put 500 quid into one company and 160 into another. Currently I am breaking just about even but the company that is currently down just got a good solid contract sorted so the price should start rising nicely.

I'm now looking at a company called Blinkx. I reckon they are on their way up.

I was going to invest in Rockhopper at one point as well but didn't have any cash at the time. Cue them finding oil in the Falklands about a month later and their price rocketing :sad2:

Wounded matey!

Last month I was going to take a punt on BP, I was adamant they wouldn't go under, and eventually come back... A few weeks later (after me bottling it) they went up around 80 pence per share.

To be honest, I do believe dealing in shares is a much better way than saving your money, especially at the moment. Going with the large companies, and especially investing in shares with banks such as RBS are very secure, and unlikely to lose you money, and could potentially gain you a fair bit.


Like Callum said, I'd like to use a % of my wages from the RM each month to increase my 'portfolio', when I leave, I'd like to be in a position where I can liquidate my assets, and start a fresh somewhere, perhaps in the US. Callum, I studied Economics at Uni (well first and second year), and you wont learn too much about shares... if you want to learn more about them, then I'd go for Finance, but both are equally boring.. ;)
 
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Wounded matey!

Last month I was going to take a punt on BP, I was adamant they wouldn't go under, and eventually come back... A few weeks later (after me bottling it) they went up around 80 pence per share.

To be honest, I do believe dealing in shares is a much better way than saving your money, especially at the moment. Going with the large companies, and especially investing in shares with banks such as RBS are very secure, and unlikely to lose you money, and could potentially gain you a fair bit.


Like Callum said, I'd like to use a % of my wages from the RM each month to increase my 'portfolio', when I leave, I'd like to be in a position where I can liquidate my assets, and start a fresh somewhere, perhaps in the US. Callum, I studied Economics at Uni (well first and second year), and you wont learn too much about shares... if you want to learn more about them, then I'd go for Finance, but both are equally boring.. ;)

Hopefully I won't be needing to go to Uni and get in a YO batch before, but in the likely event I do end up going it will be something business/economics like and easily transferable for different jobs that I'll take. I actually think I might find Economics interesting at the moment, don't worry though all this enthusiasm will soon wear off come September when the work starts.
 

Baron

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Hopefully I won't be needing to go to Uni and get in a YO batch before, but in the likely event I do end up going it will be something business/economics like and easily transferable for different jobs that I'll take. I actually think I might find Economics interesting at the moment, don't worry though all this enthusiasm will soon wear off come September when the work starts.

Ha, which Uni have you applied to?
 

Baron

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Start 6th Form in September, nowhere near applying to Unis. I'm a young'un :bigsmile:

Ahh ok, fair enough mate!

Any idea where you'd like to go?

I'm at Lancaster, cracking Business School here mate, especially for Economics!
 
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Ahh ok, fair enough mate!

Any idea where you'd like to go?

I'm at Lancaster, cracking Business School here mate, especially for Economics!

I'll probably end up somewhere near an RMR detachment, but as said I'm definitely giving 100% to getting into YO before Uni hopefully or if not might take a gap year and try and get a tour of Afghan if I become a Rubber.
 

Baron

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I'll probably end up somewhere near an RMR detachment, but as said I'm definitely giving 100% to getting into YO before Uni hopefully or if not might take a gap year and try and get a tour of Afghan if I become a Rubber.

Yeah, I'm going into my last year of Uni at the moment.

I'm a bit wary at the moment, I really want to join the RMR Merseyside, but I messed up a bit last year, so I need to get a decent mark this year to come out with a 2:1... Not sure if I can do it, but Marines is what I want to do, so a 2:2 wouldn't be the end of the world..

I wouldn't pass out before I'd start YO 2011, so I'm looking into getting my Green Beret, then hopefully getting a deployment, then going into the 2012 batch.. but we'll see what happens.. I might not even make it through RMR training due to Uni..
 

SPage

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To be honest, I do believe dealing in shares is a much better way than saving your money, especially at the moment. Going with the large companies, and especially investing in shares with banks such as RBS are very secure, and unlikely to lose you money, and could potentially gain you a fair bit.


Like Callum said, I'd like to use a % of my wages from the RM each month to increase my 'portfolio', when I leave, I'd like to be in a position where I can liquidate my assets, and start a fresh somewhere, perhaps in the US.

I'm also going to gradually put money into shares whilst in the RM. Hopefully I'll get enough money for a house deposit doing this. Then I can rent it out and have someone pay for my mortgage :bigsmile:. Well, thats the plan at least.
 

Strick

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I've thought about getting involved with shares before, but never really got round to properly researching how it works, and how to get involved. I have savings my Grandad has built up for me since I was born, and I've always thought about taking a bit of it and putting it on a 'sure bet'.

Anyone fancy pointing me in the right direction to getting started?
 
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As has been said BP, don't know if the moment has gone as anyone in the industry probably bought up shares as soon as the disaster happened. Household names seem to be a good bet usually as they like BP can wether a storm or two due to massive amounts of revenue and assets. I'm not exactly qualified to advise but it seems like common sense sometimes. Look at the share price of a company before the recession I would guess that would give a good indication as to what it may rise to again or nearly. Or copy what big investment firms do but you have to be quick before the firm buying lots cause the value to soar.

EDIT: As said I'm not qualified to say guarditfiercely would probably be better placed to give advice.
 

Baron

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I've thought about getting involved with shares before, but never really got round to properly researching how it works, and how to get involved. I have savings my Grandad has built up for me since I was born, and I've always thought about taking a bit of it and putting it on a 'sure bet'.

Anyone fancy pointing me in the right direction to getting started?

First you need a stockbroker.. For each transaction, they'll charge you, usually around ?10-12... So there is no point really only sticking in ?20, as the cost of the transaction is too large, minimum I'd be dealing in 200-300...

With a stockbroker, you want one who doesn't take an 'inactivity charge', as I got burnt when I first began dealing. Basically, every quarter, if you haven't made a transaction, you get charged.. I'd recommend Halifax, there transaction fee is around ?11 I think, and no inactivity charges.

Then you need to determine what you want to stick it in.. It depends on the level of risk you're willing to take.. 'sure bets' as in 'wont go under', would be someone like The Royal Bank of Scotland, or J Sainsbury. Neither look likely to go bust in the next 10 years or so, and with the economy likely to strengthen in the next 2-3 years, you're looking at possible decent returns in both dividends, and the share price going up..

If you want to take a bit more of a risk (remember, often the greater risk, the greater return), then I'd look into a company that operates in the building/property markets. The first thing to be hit in a recession is usually property, people just don't want to move house. The housing market at the moment isn't brilliant, and therefore you will pick up shares at low prices. As soon as the economy strengthens, people start buying property again, and therefore companies like RedRow will gain large contracts to build, and DTZ Holdings (property advisor and consultants) will begin seeing larger profits again..


'Sure bet' - J Sainsbury

'A Little Risky' - DTZ Holdings or Redrow


Now, I don't want to give you advice as such, as I don't want to be responsible for you losing your money. But I intend to put about 1000 into DTZ Holdings, my calculations suggest that in the next 3 years or so, I should be seeing profits of around ?4000.. But again, they are forecasts, and nothings set in stone. Look at Woolworths!

Rick
 

Baron

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As has been said BP, don't know if the moment has gone as anyone in the industry probably bought up shares as soon as the disaster happened. Household names seem to be a good bet usually as they like BP can wether a storm or two due to massive amounts of revenue and assets. I'm not exactly qualified to advise but it seems like common sense sometimes. Look at the share price of a company before the recession I would guess that would give a good indication as to what it may rise to again or nearly. Or copy what big investment firms do but you have to be quick before the firm buying lots cause the value to soar.

EDIT: As said I'm not qualified to say guarditfiercely would probably be better placed to give advice.


Ha, I'm by no means an expert mate! but cheers ;)

You're right, it may be a bit late with BP, it depends if they can go back to their 'glory days'. Only 3 months ago share price were at ?6.50, now you can pick them up at ?4... It's possible they could go back to ?6.50, so ?.2.50 a share profit. Not a bad return really. An outlay of ?1000, would see returns of around ?650... not amazing, but a hell of a lot more than you'd get with any bank!

It's worth noting too, that they were paying a dividend of 9.5pence per share... so a ?1000 stake, would see dividends of around ?22-25 dependent on profits. I wouldn't expect any dividend for the next couple of years though...
 

jm745

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To be honest, I do believe dealing in shares is a much better way than saving your money, especially at the moment. Going with the large companies, and especially investing in shares with banks such as RBS are very secure, and unlikely to lose you money, and could potentially gain you a fair bit.

I bet many Americans said the same in the 20's!
 

Baron

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I bet many Americans said the same in the 20's!

Ha, I understand what you're saying, but we're on the way out of the recession now, and if RBS have survived up to now, I'm pretty sure they'll continue for the foreseeable future.

In fact, they even managed to pay out a dividend in 2008, does this show the strength of the company? Or perhaps a level of stupidity by the board, trying to keep the investors happy? I'm going to go for the former..
 

Baron

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I bet many Americans said the same in the 20's!

Also, aren't the banks secured by the government, so if they go under, then the shareholders receive their money back, or at least a percentage of their outlay?
 
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