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VTomasi

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Please read, and take note. Just very frequently occuring mistakes on here and a little reminder can only benefit.

Definitely - not definitely or definatly.

Their - possessive - their training plan
They're - they are
There - indicative, 'there are/is etc'

'I done' - No. 'I did', or 'I have done'.

Vito
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Certainly for Officer candidates, spelling and grammar are an integral part of selection:

LATEST RM POTENTIAL OFFICERS COURSE (POC) BRIEF...
Essay and Interview

Next, the emphasis changes from physical to mental prowess, as you will write a short essay on a current affairs topic. You will be given a choice of at least 4 subjects, a time limit of 1 hour and a maximum of 2 sides of A4. What we are looking for ? apart from accurate grammar and spelling ? is your ability to reason, justify your arguments and communicate clearly on paper...


......You should remember that despite the early emphasis on physical prowess, a career as a Royal Marines Officer is very much about your effective intellect.
It always raises a smile when a future Officer aspirant remarks they don't care about this aspect, thinking that it's just about fitness.

It is interesting that in our changing environment, things evolve because of technology, language included.

The English language forever changes and I remember reading somewhere that Shakespeare was on record as having spelt his own name five different ways.

When I was at school, calculators were not permitted in any test or examination. Nowadays we rely on computers to check our spelling and grammar but it appears to be beyond the wit of man and computer to design infallible software for checking UK English.

It should perhaps come as no surprise to learn that the 2012 Oxford English Dictionary no longer contains the obsolete word 'gullible'.
 

Ross154

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To add to the above list:

Your - possessive. Is this your sock, Sir? It fell off your foot back there.
You're - You are. The apostrophe replaces the space and the letter 'a'.

To - Short for towards. I'm going to the brothel... er.. to the supermarket I mean.
Too - Too many / Too much
Two - 2

And it's encyclopedia, diarrhoea,.. thinking about it, they're not used that much.
Ones that I sometimes get wrong and it annoys me, are things like:
Practice / Practise. Practise, with the s, is a verb (football practise). Practice with a c is a noun (dental practice).
 

DhobiWanKenobi

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Loose - when something isn't tied down properly.

Lose - when something is no longer in your possession.


You were, I was.
 

Yossarian

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What a great thread. It's certainly something that does grind my gears.

Has anyone read 'Eats, Shoots & Leaves'?
 

VTomasi

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Indeed, my list was far from exhaustive, just a few things I noticed all too frequently.

Certainly for Officer candidates, spelling and grammar are an integral part of selection:



It always raises a smile when a future Officer aspirant remarks they don't care about this aspect, thinking that it's just about fitness.

It is interesting that in our changing environment, things evolve because of technology, language included.

The English language forever changes and I remember reading somewhere that Shakespeare was on record as having spelt his own name five different ways.

When I was at school, calculators were not permitted in any test or examination. Nowadays we rely on computers to check our spelling and grammar but it appears to be beyond the wit of man and computer to design infallible software for checking UK English.

It should perhaps come as no surprise to learn that the 2012 Oxford English Dictionary no longer contains the obsolete word 'gullible'.
While some believe that technology has led to an evolution of language, developing new terms and internet based language, I believe that technology has served only to degrade the quality of our communications skills.

All languages have a beauty of their own, English included. However this is lost through such limited vocabulary these days, fewer and fewer people being able to use words longer than 6 letters. High level, pure english is a rarity these days and our school systems treat education as though we have the brain function of algae. We are in fact capable of learning so much more from a younger age.

Anywho, a bit of correct grammar and an attempt to improve one's vocabulary goes a long way.
 

thejoshwest

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I love how the internet has improved people's grammar far more than any English teacher has.
If you write "your" instead of "you're" in English class all you get is a red mark. Mess up on the internet however, and may God have mercy on your soul...
 

Chelonian

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One fashionable theory in education (there are lots of them) is that grammatical rules are unnecessary as long as the message is understood. Nonsense!

What really pushes my clutch in is the contraction of
?I should have?? (and other similarities)
to ?I should of??
Rather than the correct colloquial
?I should?ve??.
 

VTomasi

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What really pushes my clutch in is the contraction of
?I should have?? (and other similarities)
to ?I should of??
Rather than the correct colloquial
?I should?ve??.
I very much dislike that one.
 

DD

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Also, the use of capital letters. Is it too much of an ask just to put a higher case letter on the first word of a sentence?
 

Old Man

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Just as long as no-one mentions that English has a capital 'E' and sentences end with a full stop.

'Innit?
 

Stoo2k

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I will be the first to admit that i a rubbish at this sort of thing as i could never remember which was used for which.
I shall read and read again as this is a great help for me.
:notes:
 

AVS

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Dont forget I V E (I-have) is not a word according to the forums, at least so it maintains...
 

Illustrious

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It is if you use the correct punctuation. For example; I've used the correct punctuation in this sentence.
 

TheGeek

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Dont forget I V E (I-have) is not a word according to the forums, at least so it maintains...
I V E isn't a word, it's actually I've.

Geek

Mod Edit; Just being a pain in the excrement passage by picking you up for your lacklustre use of a comma! Lusty
 

AVS

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I V E isn't a word it's actually I've.

Geek
I do know this part lads, it still makes me laugh it thinks its swearing thats all

edit: also just realised i didnt mention the swearing part, I HAZ PASSUD TEZT?
 

Grimmey

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I must admit i forget where to put apostrophes every now and then, the one that always gets me is i've...ironic seeing as my English grades were my best grades. :uglyhammer:

Although if in doubt just right click:toung:
 

Illustrious

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I must admit, I do enjoy seeing lads striving to improve themselves with regards to English. It is also a shameful indictment of the state of our education system when the internet is providing a better education that the educators. Long may the bar be raised.
 

Ross154

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Just as long as no-one mentions that English has a capital 'E' and sentences end with a full stop.

'Innit?
I have exceptions to both of the above rules.
"english" with a lower case e is a verb used in snooker. As in "To english the ball". Something to do with its spin.
And does every sentence end in a full stop?
 
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