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Starting training early

Discussion in 'General Royal Marines Joining Chit Chat' started by Slackkers, Oct 10, 2019.

  1. Slackkers

    Slackkers New Member

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    Hi all

    I posted a while ago before I did my GCSEs, I ended up doing well in them, much to families shock, and now that I'm in lower 6th and have started having more free time on my hands I reckon I should start getting my fitness in order for application in the future. (although joining regular forces is still at least 5 years in the future for me).
    I want to get to a state where I can excel as well as possible in the PJFT and the POC, however, I realize 5 years is a long time to maintain a level of fitness like that.

    I'm 75kg *text deleted* at 5ft9 in height, 16 years old
    I couldn't give you a number on body fat percentage but I ain't fat, but certainly have a layer of insulation on me
    I have a leg press of 175kg
    I can deadlift around 100kg for 5 reps fairly comfortably
    I can do 50 press-ups in the space of two minutes (not tricep pushups mind)
    I can do 50 sit-ups in the same amount of time
    my cardio is decent (nothing impressive tho), I came 150th out of 500 in school cross country
    I'm a fairly strong swimmer but more form is *text deleted*

    based on this how should I approach my training for the next 5-6 years?

    cheers for reading my bollocks, much appreciated if you respond

    p.s (something that fairly important for me is not to be to time invasive to allow for things like studying and work, I'm aware thats a bit of a stupid expectation given the difficulty of the fitness assessments but grades and education are priorities for me as well)
     
  2. Aerial

    Aerial New Member

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    At this stage all you need to concentrate on is building a good base level of fitness and forming positive habits towards exercise and nutrition (i.e. build it into your routine and keep it up rain or shine). Whether that's running, playing team sports, or getting to the gym a couple of times a week just try to keep active and consistent.

    At this stage if you want to train in a specific way, make your default push-up/pull-up/sit-up form the RM standard.

    Once you are ready to start your application you can then transfer over to a more intense and tailored programme (i.e. Arny's plan or the offical Get Fit to Join one) for a few months in the build up to PRMC/POC etc. Having those good habits and solid base level of fitness will pay dividends at this stage.

    One thing I would say is that you don't need to get too caught up on things like your body fat percentage or what your weightlifting stats are like. Focus on eating right and training well and your body will adjust as needed.

    Your focus for training should be on stamina and muscular endurance so how much you can lift isn't really relevant. Hill sprints for example will probably be the best form of lower body conditioning you can doin preparation for RT. Weightlifting can play it's part in training if done in the right way (with the priority being compound lifts at higher reps rather than how much you heavy you can go), but bodyweight exercises should be the foundation of your strength training.
     
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    Last edited: Oct 11, 2019
  3. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    In short, run don't lift.
     
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  4. ThatCrazyCat

    ThatCrazyCat New Member

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    Train full body 2-3x a week for the same protein synthesis (mon/wed/fri or mon/fri), that is if you're currently running a split 4-6x a week. That would free up more time for you to do cardio. You'd probably like HIIT hill sprints since time is a concern for you, so these two would get you the most bang for your buck. Then whatever time you have left should be spent low intensity cardio.

    If it was me, I'd drop the leg press in favour of the barbell back squat, or preferably the box squat (posterior chain emphasis + explosiveness) because it's more functional.

    I'd also prioritise deadlifts and squats because they tend to have the most athletic carryover, but upper body compounds shouldn't be ignored. Train without gear like belts/wraps otherwise your core and grip won't develop as effectively (if you do use them).
     
  5. Slackkers

    Slackkers New Member

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    thanks guys ill start training like that more

    *text deleted* Ninja_stoker, i heard you were a warfare officer, thats a role I'm concidering in the future as well, could you tell me about it?
     
  6. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    Not quite, a Warrant Officer. My former branch was Marine Engineering (Stoker) before I moved into recruiting fifteen years ago. I'm now doing PR stuff, since last December, so may not be 100% up to speed.

    What I can tell you is Warfare Officers probably spend more time serving afloat than any other Commissioned branch of the Royal Navy. They are the branch, more than any other, who go on to command Warships. The first couple of years or so is spent keeping watches on the bridge, learning the ropes and basics of navigation & seamanship, but as the name implies, they also work toward becoming the Principal Warfare Officer (PWO), the subject matter expert, who fights the ship and is responsible to the commanding officer for fighting the offensive and defensive battlespace.

    Truth is, although highly trained to exacting standards, the bulk of the work involves navigating the ship - simply because we ain't fighting anyone in particular at present, but no-one has a scooby what's around the corner.
     
  7. Slackkers

    Slackkers New Member

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  8. Ninja_Stoker

    Ninja_Stoker Admin

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    There's always stuff going on somewhere, operationally.

    The service does indeed engage those undertaking piracy by various means, be it RM boarding parties, helicopter air to surface engagement or by using ship-borne close-in weapons systems.

    You may well encounter this type of operational tasking, if deployed to an area where piracy is prevalent but it's seldom six months-worth of daily combat ops.