Struggling with motivation and change of service

Hershey

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Hi all, many of you know me as an aspiring royal marine with alot of enthusiasm and someone who improved alot over the last year. Unfortunately a month ago, I took my vpjft and failed. After being told an incorrect time and waiting for an hour for the Sgt to come on the call and being given instruction to perform burpees in the wrong form, I was in a dispute which my CA backed me on as I had not practiced burpees to the standard the Sgt requested I do, turns out he asked me to do them incorrectly in the first place. Long story short I got very frustrated and quit. After long and hard thought about it, I decided I wasn't ready for the royal marines, I've had constant trouble throughout my application with medical standards and fitness up and down I decided enough was enough. I've opted to join the raf and I'm already on 2nd to last stage of my application. I currently have a medical in 2 weeks and I'm confident I will pass. Issue is I have my fitness test potentially 6 weeks after medical and I've lost all motivation to train. I've just moved into a flat with the Mrs and its been a stressful 2 weeks. I've started smoking again and I'm trying to give it up and I haven't trainined since 23rd November. Has anybody got any tips that can help me ease into training again. I know as soon as I train I'll be back on the band wagon. I was really fit 2 weeks ago but I struggling to get out of bed in the mornings at the moment. I think it's mixed emotions. I'm obviously gutted about my rm application but I am geared up for the raf. I think I just need some of you fellas advice to perk me up abit!

*text deleted*if anyone was wondering why I'm staying on this forum, the egoat (raf forum) is rubbish and the support I've had on here is surreal.

Hey buddy,

I hope this finds you and the Mrs in a better place than when you wrote it. I've had a similar experience in the past. The first time I applied for Royal Marines Selection was in 2014. I applied for the officer role and had trouble with my medical and loads of friends who basically discouraged me. I got found TMU, the appeal took ages and eventually I injured myself and found it hard to bounce back. One minute I had been in the best shape of my life, living in Scotland with an ex-RM mate of mine running up hills and feeling really positive. The next minute I was hearing all my other friends telling me I wasn't cut out for it, that it wasn't for me, that I was making a terrible decision. Then I got swine flu, and in the space of two weeks I lost an alarming amount of weight - it was possibly about 6 kilos if I remember correctly. Suffice to say, I was gutted - I had turned down a very prestigious University to pursue this dream and was back living at home with my parents, in a town with a bad reputation, and I was back to washing dishes and waiting tables. Worst of all, I believed all the crap my internal tape-player was playing, so I eventually withdrew my application.

After that experience I felt hugely discouraged and went back to drinking, smoking, and playing music in dive bars to about 4 disinterested scaffolders - I didn't get back into my phys until 2019. I'm just letting you know this stuff so you know that I can empathize with you. It's hard to bounce back when things have been challenging.

For the past three years I've worked as a support worker with homeless people facing complex issues (mental health, substance misuse, offending behaviour, institutionalization etc). I'm not an expert by any means but there are few things I've seen that can really help people when they're looking for that anchor point in their lives. I hope some of these are useful:

  1. Talking about it - you've already done this, so you're on the road already. Honesty is the start of all good things. A friend once told me "real honesty leads to real courage". No matter what the issue is, it's tiring to carry this stuff around. When you're truly honest with yourself, God (if that's your jam), and others, then there is often a sense of release and you'll often be surprised by how may people put their hands up and go, "Yep! I've been there mate!" It makes us feel less alone.
  2. Being kind to yourself - You've had a hard time buddy. Sometimes the most healthy thing is giving yourself permission to say, "well... That was a bit *text deleted*ed up wasn't it?" Sometimes, we spend a lot of time telling ourselves that loads of people have it harder, that we're just weak, and there must be something wrong with us. That's the negative inner-tape playing. The truth is that the negative inner-tape is bollocks and it doesn't do anything to help us on our journey. Reject the inner tape, be as kind to yourself as you are to the people you love. Ironically, we can often love other people better than ourselves and tell ourselves things that we would never say to our worst enemies. Positivity, as long as it's not delusional, is 99% of the time more pragmatic than negativity. Negativity gives a good impression of being rational, but it's more or less useless.
  3. Ask yourself "What are the facts?" and list them - When you're lying in bed, feeling like crap, get a piece of paper and ask yourself, "Okay, what are the facts?". Start with basics: Can I control my breathing? Do all my limbs work? Am I in a bed? Is there a roof above me? Can I name three people who love me? What can I smell? What can I taste? What can I touch? etc. These exercises aren't meant to make you feel guilty about how you're feeling right now, they're meant to ground you in reality and interrupt the loop. You'll be surprised how quickly this can take you out of your head and back into the present.
  4. Reflecting - Sometimes, the best way to interrupt that loop is to get it out of your head and on to paper. It might well be that you reflect on what your RM application meant to you and you realize that it might have become a bit of an idol, or perhaps your identity and self-value had become a bit too tangled up in it. Who knows? It's your journey - I have faith that you'll find out whatever you need to find out. I suggest you give it a go and try unpicking this type of stuff. The other thing that's quite helpful for building a solid foundation is thinking about what your principles are in life - I highly recommend having that written and pinned up somewhere so you can look at it and go, "Okay, so I don't feel like going for a run this morning... but one of my principles is _________ and that means I should probably get moving."
  5. Preparation - I find that if someone says "Oh it's fine... I'll just go for a run tomorrow..." They don't often do it. However, if they spend the end of the day laying out and prepping their trainers, socks, shorts, T-shirt, water bottle, post-run meal etc. ready for the morning then their mindset is geared towards starting the next day with a run. You've spent the time doing the prep, you're invested. You're mind has done the decision-making by that point. Give it a go.
  6. Make a list of the people on your "Team" - We all need a team in life. You need people who are going to encourage you and cut through the discouraging *text deleted* that occasionally climbs on top of us. Take some time to think about the people who have had this impact on you - the people who have looked at you and have not only seen the best of you, but they have called out the best of you. These are the people who you never need to wear a mask with, the people who will not make you feel small by reaching out to them when you're not 100%. These people are your "Team" - and doing this will be good for all sorts of situations in life, not just this one. When I did this exercise, I went to the extent of giving each of them each a call and told them this so that A) they knew how much they meant to me, but also B) they knew what the score was. When you get to a place of low moral, "break the glass" and get them around you.
  7. Taking things further - If you give it a bit of time, and things only feel more challenging then remember that there are plenty of people out there that you can talk to. If you are able to, there might be a independent charity that could offer you counselling that, by being non-NHS based, won't come up on your GP records and effect future service options. You can also speak informally to a mental health phone line such Mindline, Samaritans or the NHS 111 service and ask for their perspective. They'll never try and pressure you into anything and, again, giving them a ring won't come up on your medical. Furthermore, feel free to ping me direct message if that feels right. No pressure.
Anyway - enough of my *text deleted*. You're clearly a bit of a legend because unlike me, you went and applied for the RAF after your RM situation and cracked on with it! I honestly think you've got this mate. And whatever you do, wherever you go in life, you can take the wisdom and the learning from this time and use those Commando values to be the best version of yourself that you can be. My ex-RM mates told me that although it may take a Green Beret to make a Royal Marine, you don't need one to be a warrior.

All the best buddy,

Hersh
 

Rob20

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My personal view is, if I can do a few years in the raf find out whether I like it and if its not satisfactory enough for me then I'll transfer to the corps. I think with everything going on and my ups and downs at the moment I think the regiment at the very least will give me some quality military skills that I could carry over to the corps if the time came about and not only that but my fitness levels will be pretty ace meaning training for the corps should come with alot more ease than my current status. Yes Im abit disappointed in myself for not persuing the marines however JTAC and 2 sqn personally are 2 things I'm looking forward to cracking, if I'm not getting the edge after that then the corps it is! I've got 10 years to change my mind so I'm going for RAF for now. I think Pgsc will give me a good insight into the regiment and that's when I'll make my final decision. I honestly appreciate the advice though and totally agree with what your saying.

Fair enough mate im not going to try to pursuade you either way. Although don't assume that transferring is as easy as that. I'd say join a unit under the impression that you'll never be able to transfer, so get it right first time.

The Corps also does not require any experience taken from other branches of armed forces otherwise they'd request it.

Dammit, maybe I am trying to pursuade you. Na jokes aside, the military is a strange beast and you need to join a unit which suits your needs.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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Set yourself a routine.
Set a bedtime, don’t spend it on your phone. Read a book. Set an alarm at a normal time the next morning (don’t kick the arse out of it, sensible) and force yourself to get out of bed.
Make your bed and take little steps.

Even if you end up sitting on the sofa, at least have your morning routine done. Take little steps everyday.

Everyone thinks organising the sh1t out of your days will motivate you, it won’t. Make small changes each day. If you are on fire you don’t make plans for 3 days away, you worry about the next 3 seconds.
If you don’t feel like going for run, then go for a walk. Get out and get that fresh air and the blood pumping.

Set a weekly goal of Km to walk or run. Don’t thrash yourself, just build up the routines and the habits.


As an example, I’m sure it was Terry Crews who described dragging himself out of depression by forcing himself to go to the gym. But he would make himself go and touch the door. Then go home. After a few days of this, he would go to the gym and walk into the reception and walk out.
After a few days of this he would walk in and touch one of the bikes. Then walk out and go home.
After a few days of this he would just sit on the bike and peddle for a while, then head home.
Understand where this is going?
Eventually he was smashing workouts and 'extra phys' it.
The hardest part is dragging yourself to do it, once you are in the flow and habit, it’s easier.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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My personal view is, if I can do a few years in the raf find out whether I like it and if its not satisfactory enough for me then I'll transfer to the corps. I think with everything going on and my ups and downs at the moment I think the regiment at the very least will give me some quality military skills that I could carry over to the corps if the time came about and not only that but my fitness levels will be pretty ace meaning training for the corps should come with alot more ease than my current status. Yes Im abit disappointed in myself for not persuing the marines however JTAC and 2 sqn personally are 2 things I'm looking forward to cracking, if I'm not getting the edge after that then the corps it is! I've got 10 years to change my mind so I'm going for RAF for now. I think Pgsc will give me a good insight into the regiment and that's when I'll make my final decision. I honestly appreciate the advice though and totally agree with what your saying.

I’m telling you now. That won’t happen.

If you want to join the Marines then do it now. I’ve had a few mates give me that exact speech and you know what? They never transferred out and they either left the forces or are stuck in the RAF. And all of them regret it.

I don’t know if the RAF recruiters just make up fantasy stories or whatever, but everyone I know that’s been spoken too about the RAF Regt come out thinking it’s “just like the Marines”.

Having worked with them a few times and got mates in them, do not do it unless you actually want to join them. Do not join them as a “stop gap” or to “get experience”.

They are a glorified army infantry unit, the only “Gucci” thing they do is MERT. They don’t even cover Air Defence anymore, the Royal Artillery took over the Rapier Air defence system. The Royal Marines have a greater Air Defence capability than the RAF Regt.
They are the butt of every joke, and there isn’t much good said about their SFSG drafts either.

That being said, they have a job to do and don’t appreciate time wasters “doing a few years” then transferring. And as much as we all slag off 2 sqn because they cut about saying they are the “real 2 para”, P Company and Beat up is not to be thought of as a given. It’s a competitive draft.

And as for “transferable skills”? All you will get is bad habits and have to relearn old tricks. I did RM training with previous experience and it just caused me grief trying to relearn bad habits, and as for the ex RAF regt lads in the troop, they weren’t anything special. It’s recruit training, it’s designed to take civilians with no training and train them. The clue is in the name. I don’t know where this idea keeps coming from about needing experience to join the Marines.
And I don’t think the RAF Regiment would appreciate everyone thinking their careers is a work experience to “see if people like it” they have the same contracts, do a similar job

If you want to join the Corps and be a Commando, like you username. Then reach into your trousers, take a grip of your plums and be a man.

If you want to join the RAF Regiment as a Gunner, it’s not a total bad job, could be worse, you could be RLC... but fair enough crack on and have pride in your choice but don’t kid yourself or make excuses about transferring.

Either way you need to be content with your choice and hold your head high with whatever decision you make.
 
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Grimey Arches

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I'm going to be honest but it sounds like you're just looking for people to make you feel better for changing your mind and justifying it, at the end of the day it's your life and the choices you make nobody can judge you for them and you shouldn't be worried of other people opinion.

It also sounds you aren't really settled and have your head in the right place to train, I moved myself and partner out after she had a stroke in to a new place. It took me 2 days of non stop van trips of loading/unloading by myself and then came to the part of unpacking and building our new furniture, I know how stressful it can be and what toll it takes on you mentally and physically.

As others have pointed out and are in a place to comment you may is it regret your decision or change your mind at any point, nobody wants to be stuck in a job they dislike or around people they don't fit in with so think wisely about just doing for a possible few years.

My personal opinion is you aren't really in the right frame of mind to be joining either of them if you're struggling with motivation or actually improving your fitness, you need to have the right attitude and frame of mind to succeed in both roles. Get your home life sorted and quit the smoking, enjoy Christmas but come back with a plan of action even if it means starting of with small steps.

It may sound heartless but everyone has their own stories and lads have failed tests, lost family members or overcome adversity and still have passed out from CTCRM, and so many more who can't join and would give anything for just a chance.
 

Grimey Arches

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"I will persist until I succeed. Always will I take another step. If that is of no avail I will take another, and yet another. In truth, one step at a time is not too difficult.... I know that small attempts, repeated, will complete any undertaking." - OG Mandin

10 points if anyone has heard this before?
 

Blades1889

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"I will persist until I succeed. Always will I take another step. If that is of no avail I will take another, and yet another. In truth, one step at a time is not too difficult.... I know that small attempts, repeated, will complete any undertaking." - OG Mandin

10 points if anyone has heard this before?
Commando: On the Front Line: Episode 4 - Tears and Fears at 21:50
Can’t post the link :(
 

future-commando

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Hey buddy,

I hope this finds you and the Mrs in a better place than when you wrote it. I've had a similar experience in the past. The first time I applied for Royal Marines Selection was in 2014. I applied for the officer role and had trouble with my medical and loads of friends who basically discouraged me. I got found TMU, the appeal took ages and eventually I injured myself and found it hard to bounce back. One minute I had been in the best shape of my life, living in Scotland with an ex-RM mate of mine running up hills and feeling really positive. The next minute I was hearing all my other friends telling me I wasn't cut out for it, that it wasn't for me, that I was making a terrible decision. Then I got swine flu, and in the space of two weeks I lost an alarming amount of weight - it was possibly about 6 kilos if I remember correctly. Suffice to say, I was gutted - I had turned down a very prestigious University to pursue this dream and was back living at home with my parents, in a town with a bad reputation, and I was back to washing dishes and waiting tables. Worst of all, I believed all the crap my internal tape-player was playing, so I eventually withdrew my application.

After that experience I felt hugely discouraged and went back to drinking, smoking, and playing music in dive bars to about 4 disinterested scaffolders - I didn't get back into my phys until 2019. I'm just letting you know this stuff so you know that I can empathize with you. It's hard to bounce back when things have been challenging.

For the past three years I've worked as a support worker with homeless people facing complex issues (mental health, substance misuse, offending behaviour, institutionalization etc). I'm not an expert by any means but there are few things I've seen that can really help people when they're looking for that anchor point in their lives. I hope some of these are useful:

  1. Talking about it - you've already done this, so you're on the road already. Honesty is the start of all good things. A friend once told me "real honesty leads to real courage". No matter what the issue is, it's tiring to carry this stuff around. When you're truly honest with yourself, God (if that's your jam), and others, then there is often a sense of release and you'll often be surprised by how may people put their hands up and go, "Yep! I've been there mate!" It makes us feel less alone.
  2. Being kind to yourself - You've had a hard time buddy. Sometimes the most healthy thing is giving yourself permission to say, "well... That was a bit *text deleted*ed up wasn't it?" Sometimes, we spend a lot of time telling ourselves that loads of people have it harder, that we're just weak, and there must be something wrong with us. That's the negative inner-tape playing. The truth is that the negative inner-tape is bollocks and it doesn't do anything to help us on our journey. Reject the inner tape, be as kind to yourself as you are to the people you love. Ironically, we can often love other people better than ourselves and tell ourselves things that we would never say to our worst enemies. Positivity, as long as it's not delusional, is 99% of the time more pragmatic than negativity. Negativity gives a good impression of being rational, but it's more or less useless.
  3. Ask yourself "What are the facts?" and list them - When you're lying in bed, feeling like crap, get a piece of paper and ask yourself, "Okay, what are the facts?". Start with basics: Can I control my breathing? Do all my limbs work? Am I in a bed? Is there a roof above me? Can I name three people who love me? What can I smell? What can I taste? What can I touch? etc. These exercises aren't meant to make you feel guilty about how you're feeling right now, they're meant to ground you in reality and interrupt the loop. You'll be surprised how quickly this can take you out of your head and back into the present.
  4. Reflecting - Sometimes, the best way to interrupt that loop is to get it out of your head and on to paper. It might well be that you reflect on what your RM application meant to you and you realize that it might have become a bit of an idol, or perhaps your identity and self-value had become a bit too tangled up in it. Who knows? It's your journey - I have faith that you'll find out whatever you need to find out. I suggest you give it a go and try unpicking this type of stuff. The other thing that's quite helpful for building a solid foundation is thinking about what your principles are in life - I highly recommend having that written and pinned up somewhere so you can look at it and go, "Okay, so I don't feel like going for a run this morning... but one of my principles is _________ and that means I should probably get moving."
  5. Preparation - I find that if someone says "Oh it's fine... I'll just go for a run tomorrow..." They don't often do it. However, if they spend the end of the day laying out and prepping their trainers, socks, shorts, T-shirt, water bottle, post-run meal etc. ready for the morning then their mindset is geared towards starting the next day with a run. You've spent the time doing the prep, you're invested. You're mind has done the decision-making by that point. Give it a go.
  6. Make a list of the people on your "Team" - We all need a team in life. You need people who are going to encourage you and cut through the discouraging *text deleted* that occasionally climbs on top of us. Take some time to think about the people who have had this impact on you - the people who have looked at you and have not only seen the best of you, but they have called out the best of you. These are the people who you never need to wear a mask with, the people who will not make you feel small by reaching out to them when you're not 100%. These people are your "Team" - and doing this will be good for all sorts of situations in life, not just this one. When I did this exercise, I went to the extent of giving each of them each a call and told them this so that A) they knew how much they meant to me, but also B) they knew what the score was. When you get to a place of low moral, "break the glass" and get them around you.
  7. Taking things further - If you give it a bit of time, and things only feel more challenging then remember that there are plenty of people out there that you can talk to. If you are able to, there might be a independent charity that could offer you counselling that, by being non-NHS based, won't come up on your GP records and effect future service options. You can also speak informally to a mental health phone line such Mindline, Samaritans or the NHS 111 service and ask for their perspective. They'll never try and pressure you into anything and, again, giving them a ring won't come up on your medical. Furthermore, feel free to ping me direct message if that feels right. No pressure.
Anyway - enough of my *text deleted*. You're clearly a bit of a legend because unlike me, you went and applied for the RAF after your RM situation and cracked on with it! I honestly think you've got this mate. And whatever you do, wherever you go in life, you can take the wisdom and the learning from this time and use those Commando values to be the best version of yourself that you can be. My ex-RM mates told me that although it may take a Green Beret to make a Royal Marine, you don't need one to be a warrior.

All the best buddy,

Hersh
I really appreciate that mate. Thank you for taking the time to give me that advice.
 

future-commando

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I appreciate everyone's input on here whether it's harsh or not. Yes I will take more time to think about everything but the reason I've got my mind set on the raf is because I've had the best experience with them out of all recruitment processes I've been through. Originally I tried joining the army and was told no as I wasn't medically fit been waiting 3 years for an NHS appointment to appeal. So that's out the question. Then I discovered the marines and was so geared up to do it but had medical issues with them they kept finding new issues which I had to appeal. And then came the Vpjft which I could complete as required, had an awful experience although the pti was polite got told the incorrect form god knows how and got into a rut about that. Was told to retake on feb but after a long hard think decided I felt like I was going in circles. I probably should have bit the bullet and waited to retake but I just felt like I'd lost all motivation and ruined my opportunity. It might be a decision I live to regret but only time will tell. Ive thought about the raf reg time and time again and I know it's now all guns Blazing and I might hate it but its what I'm going to do and it's what I'm going to join. Like I said I might get to pgsc and hate it or love it. That's when I'll make the big decision. Yes transfer might never happen and leave and rejoin might never happen either but who knows I might decide I just enjoy military life as a whole no matter the job and I may even decide to change trades in the raf and go that route. I feel alot more confident in my ability to join the raf then I do to join the marines. That could be down to doubting myself and my ability but it is what it is. I haven't had the best of luck with joining a service and I probably haven't been as committed as I should have been at times. Having worked with ex raf (women) in 2 different jobs and having 2 friends in the raf I've had their input on their experiences and they have told me it's the best thing they ever done. Like I said it might be the wrong decision but it might be the right one. I'm going to go for it and I'm going to decide after pgsc or even training whether it's right for me or not. Regardless of what service I'm in.... I'm staying on this forum as its by far the best forum I've ever endured. Honest opinions is the best advice you can get. Much better than the sugar coated crap you get on arsse or egoat.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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I appreciate everyone's input on here whether it's harsh or not. Yes I will take more time to think about everything but the reason I've got my mind set on the raf is because I've had the best experience with them out of all recruitment processes I've been through. Originally I tried joining the army and was told no as I wasn't medically fit been waiting 3 years for an NHS appointment to appeal. So that's out the question. Then I discovered the marines and was so geared up to do it but had medical issues with them they kept finding new issues which I had to appeal. And then came the Vpjft which I could complete as required, had an awful experience although the pti was polite got told the incorrect form god knows how and got into a rut about that. Was told to retake on feb but after a long hard think decided I felt like I was going in circles. I probably should have bit the bullet and waited to retake but I just felt like I'd lost all motivation and ruined my opportunity. It might be a decision I live to regret but only time will tell. Ive thought about the raf reg time and time again and I know it's now all guns Blazing and I might hate it but its what I'm going to do and it's what I'm going to join. Like I said I might get to pgsc and hate it or love it. That's when I'll make the big decision. Yes transfer might never happen and leave and rejoin might never happen either but who knows I might decide I just enjoy military life as a whole no matter the job and I may even decide to change trades in the raf and go that route. I feel alot more confident in my ability to join the raf then I do to join the marines. That could be down to doubting myself and my ability but it is what it is. I haven't had the best of luck with joining a service and I probably haven't been as committed as I should have been at times. Having worked with ex raf (women) in 2 different jobs and having 2 friends in the raf I've had their input on their experiences and they have told me it's the best thing they ever done. Like I said it might be the wrong decision but it might be the right one. I'm going to go for it and I'm going to decide after pgsc or even training whether it's right for me or not. Regardless of what service I'm in.... I'm staying on this forum as its by far the best forum I've ever endured. Honest opinions is the best advice you can get. Much better than the sugar coated crap you get on arsse or egoat.
RAF is just being a civvie, in a uniform
;)
Whichever path you take, you need to be at peace with it and throw yourself at it 100%.
Have pride in what you work hard for, there’s some good soldiers in the RAF Regt, just please don’t fall into the bad attitude some of the young ones have and no one except them uses the term “big 3” so never get drawn into it.

All the best and keep us updated. It would be good for another perspective.
 

future-commando

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RAF is just being a civvie, in a uniform
;)
Whichever path you take, you need to be at peace with it and throw yourself at it 100%.
Have pride in what you work hard for, there’s some good soldiers in the RAF Regt, just please don’t fall into the bad attitude some of the young ones have and no one except them uses the term “big 3” so never get drawn into it.

All the best and keep us updated. It would be good for another perspective.
[/QUOTE
Yes heard that term before and not fond of it. End of the day it's a totally different role all together and I'll jump at every opportunity that comes my way. I'll keep you updated
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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I'd say join RAF regt, go RAF Regt > 2 sqnd > JTAC > BPC > SFSG > SAS/SBS.

That's a solid career path right there.

The competition for 2 sqn alone is fierce. It’s not a sure thing, it’s reserved for the top achievers in recruit training, or from high achieving ranks from other Squadrons.
And the smaller number of SFSG billets reserved for RAF Regiment, a platoon strength if I remember correctly, is even harder, with a lower turnover.
 

Rob20

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I'd say join RAF regt, go RAF Regt > 2 sqnd > JTAC > BPC > SFSG > SAS/SBS.

That's a solid career path right there.

So if SF is the end goal surely the RAF REG is not the best starting point?
For the record JTAC is available to GD Cpls and I have a good mate who does it and loves it.
 

future-commando

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So if SF is the end goal surely the RAF REG is not the best starting point?
For the record JTAC is available to GD Cpls and I have a good mate who does it and loves it.
For me personally SF is just an option, I don't know how far or where I want to go with my military career all I do know for sure is 2 sqn and JTAC are the 2 mains goals for me.
 

The guide

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@Periphery . are you aware how few RAF ranks join SF , and its for a reason , depsite claiming to be one of the big 3 , RAF Regt are a ground RAF airfield defence unit, nothing more - lost Rapier , lost thier light armour sqn - They have a sqn that marches a bit , and one the sets itself up as a para unit - yeah right.!.

Thier most recent achievments include totally failing at Khandahar- where Taliban manged to infiltrate and attack a camp that holds about 10,000 rnas and destroy aircraft - the sole job is to defend the flippin airfield and they failed - without question.! But they did manage to shoot thier own body armour so they looked nails.!!.

The vast amount of RAF ranks are professional guys and know their jobs including the Regiment lads who are one of the few RAF branches to hold much pride as a branch, but it is also not unfair to describe many within the RAF as a whole as civvies in uniform - this is where i will add i did ten years in the RAF.!

This is not aimed at the opening poster as everbody has to do what is right for them and JTAC is a decent job - but it is also true that the RAF Regiment is full of blokes that did not have to courage to go for it (Para,s or Marines) as they doubted thier own ability when for many there was no need.
 

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So if SF is the end goal surely the RAF REG is not the best starting point?
For the record JTAC is available to GD Cpls and I have a good mate who does it and loves it.
I concur.
@Periphery . are you aware how few RAF ranks join SF , and its for a reason , depsite claiming to be one of the big 3 , RAF Regt are a ground RAF airfield defence unit, nothing more - lost Rapier , lost thier light armour sqn - They have a sqn that marches a bit , and one the sets itself up as a para unit - yeah right.!.

Thier most recent achievments include totally failing at Khandahar- where Taliban manged to infiltrate and attack a camp that holds about 10,000 rnas and destroy aircraft - the sole job is to defend the flippin airfield and they failed - without question.! But they did manage to shoot thier own body armour so they looked nails.!!.

The vast amount of RAF ranks are professional guys and know their jobs including the Regiment lads who are one of the few RAF branches to hold much pride as a branch, but it is also not unfair to describe many within the RAF as a whole as civvies in uniform - this is where i will add i did ten years in the RAF.!

This is not aimed at the opening poster as everbody has to do what is right for them and JTAC is a decent job - but it is also true that the RAF Regiment is full of blokes that did not have to courage to go for it (Para,s or Marines) as they doubted thier own ability when for many there was no need.

To be fair to them, I know a few lads involved in that attack, and it wasn’t the RAF Regt’s sector that they attacked from, and had to race over from the other side to get stuck in.
But sadly yes a few choice individuals were silly boys and decided to shoot their body armour to look “nails”.

Agreed some of the RAF are a professional lot but with the majority of their specialisations stripped from them, they are nothing more than a glorified infantry unit.

They are mega Gucci at CBRN though, but that’s maybe because bootnecks made other interesting uses for their respirators....
 

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