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Stypidity and shin splints

Discussion in 'Common Training Injuries' started by AngryArgie, May 6, 2019.

  1. AngryArgie

    AngryArgie Member

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    Well lads I’ve truly gone and *text deleted*ed myself, decided to switch things up a bit two weeks ago and do two weeks on Arnys plan with an emphasis on intervals and hill sprints had no real problems other than having a little fret about whether my shoes might be causing me to heel strike but carried on anyway, so I took the weekend off to recover planning to do a BF and an RMFA today to see if I could shave half a minute or so off my return 1.5. Did the first 1.5 today coming in at around 10:30 at a steady pace took a minute then set out on my last mile and a half doing it at what I believe to be the fastest I’ve done it yet, however me being a massive *text deleted*ing mong I forgot to start my watch again when I reset it so I guess I’ll have to wait till next week to see my progress, it’s annoying but not much I can really do about that now anyway more to the point I limped home after that and my left shin/lower knee area aches quite a bit but not my right, going to foam roll and stretch then put some ice on it and see how it is after some kip tomorrow, was planning on doing a steady 5 miler tomorrow but wondering if that’s the best idea now.

    Anyone have any suggestions or ideas on if this is actually a sign of shin splints and what to do tomorrow if it’s still playing up or even if it’s not. Apologies about the wall of text, seen many posts on here about lads putting themselves out of action via shin splints after pressing too hard and don’t want to end up in the same boat to be honest.
     
  2. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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  3. AngryArgie

    AngryArgie Member

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    Will do, thank you!
     
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    Last edited: May 6, 2019
  4. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Two brufen and a bit of tubi-grip- Next!


    But seriously, this very avoidable by training sensibly.


    • rest – stop the activity that causes your shin splints for at least two weeks.
    • ice – hold an ice pack against your shins for around 10 minutes every few hours for the first few days; this helps with pain and swelling
    • pain relief – ibuprofen, to help relieve the pain & inflammation.
    • switch to low-impact activities – using a cross-trainer, cycling, swimming etc are good ways to keep phys ticking along without putting too much pressure on your shins while they heal


    The current theories for treating and preventing medial tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) revolve around reducing the relative amount of stress on the tibia.

    In time you need to look at strengthening the supporting muscles.
     
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  5. AngryArgie

    AngryArgie Member

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    That’s one thing I’ve never been able to do in any part of my life haha, but I’ll take your advice mate *text deleted* strap up and go for a slow 2 mile tomorrow and see how my leg feels after a 5 minute break and if it’s alright I’ll carry on, but I’m going to Ice up tonight and have the Ibuprofen at the ready tomorrow anyway. Thank you!
     
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  6. kirbymorgan17

    kirbymorgan17 New Member

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    as suggested i have to agree two complete weeks lock down from the pounding if you have access to a swimming pool river or seaway nice and easy does it if not have a cold bath you sound very enthusiastic as it should be if you could find yourself able to refrain and allow the shins to repair themselves you may find that you will never suffer a recurrence of this condition.
     
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  7. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Be aware, the importance of adequate rest & treatment cannot be over stated.

    Sometimes shin pain can have other causes and you should also seek a professional diagnosis.

    For example
    • Stress fractures. These are small breaks in your tibia, caused by repeated stress on the bone.
    • Strain- This is where you’re prone to overstretching certain muscles in the front of your leg, damaging some of the muscle fibres.
    • Chronic exertional compartment syndrome. When you exercise, the extra blood flow to your muscles makes them swell up. Your muscles sit inside an enclosed compartment of stiff tissue, so they don’t have much room to expand. If this tissue can’t expand well enough, the pressure inside increases and blood can’t flow into your muscle. This reduces the amount of oxygen reaching your muscle, leading to pain. Chronic exertional compartment syndrome isn’t very common.
    • Tendon problems (tendinopathy). Overloading or overusing a tendon can cause pain and swelling.
     
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  8. AngryArgie

    AngryArgie Member

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    Woke up this morning and it felt alright so I thought I’d try a slow 2 miles and see how it was after that, finished those and there was a bit of an ache, went home iced up and foam rolled a bit. I’m going to take until Friday off and see how it feels then and if there’s still an ache after some running then I’ll book myself in for a Physiotherapy session and see if there’s any problems that are in danger of doing me lasting damage.

    Thanks for your replies guys, really helpful I’ll let you know how things progress. Cheers!
     
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  9. Cheezy hammy eggy

    Cheezy hammy eggy Active Member

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    My son suffered with shin splints prior to joining RT and up until gym pass out.
    He bought orthotic insoles which helped the condition, stretching prior to and after training helped him also, he did this by placing the balls of his feet on a stair/step facing upwards, sets of 10 x heel raises four times a day, support your weight by means of a banister etc.
    The symptoms subsided until now he is pain free and in week 20.
    See the other threads on here and keep the ice and brufen going.
    Best of luck shippers.
     
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  10. AngryArgie

    AngryArgie Member

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    My running trainers have quite a large heel, so I think that may be causing some of the pain, those heel raises sound like they will definitely help though, thank you and good luck to your son!
     
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  11. The guide

    The guide Ex RAF, Ex Royal Marines, now RN.! go figure

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    DT said you never did Phys.-banghead-...!..:D:D
     
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  12. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Exactly, that was why I never picked up any of these silly injuries.
     
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