Success stories

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
I'd like to hear people's success stories; particularly those who had years of injury problems to finally overcome them and succeed. You don't need to have passed out yet, or even in training, but perhaps 6 months injury free?

Personally, I've had years of ankle injuries, and idiotically was reluctant to push my GP for Xrays/MRI's etc in the hope that it'd miraculously heal, and I'd be able to crack on. Several years later, I find myself in the same, if not worse state, and have just booked in an appointment to see the doc, and to get the ball rolling on finally getting it sorted out properly.

A friend of mine had a horrible time with his ankle around the same time my problems started, he got his sorted immediately, and is now a year back into football and is having absolutely no problems at all. It goes to show, no matter how much pain you're in, and if you think your future looks bleak with regards to sporting activity, modern medicine CAN treat some not very pleasant problems.

It's so frustrating, if I'd done this straight away, and surgery (or whatever treatment I will receive) worked, I'd most likely be well on my way through the selection process (if not already in training, or even passed out!).

Lads, if you have a problem, MAKE SURE YOU GO TO THE DOCTORS! Forget all this ''I don't want it on my medical records'', just go and get whatever's wrong sorted. If you leave or train on an existing injury, it will get worse. Rest and get it sorted before re-starting training. If it slows down your application, so what? It's better than never having the chance.

All the best, and may you live long and prosper.

Ninja_Stoker said:
Admin edit:

To clarify the service policy on custom insoles:

To minimise the risk of shin splints prevention is better than cure. The first & obvious issue is to ensure your trainers have adequately padded/cushioned heels. Avoid running with weight, avoid prolonged running in boots (ideally don't run in boots at all), avoid running for significant distances on metalled (tarmac/concrete) surfaces.

Whilst 'off the shelf' insoles (such as sorbothane - often integrally fitted to training shoes already) are acceptable, prescribed, custom-made insoles can be a bar to entry as they indicate a significant pre-existing issue which is highly likely to recur in training.

There appears to be confusion with regard Orthotic insoles as they are commonly prescribed to recruits who develop shin-splints during training, which suggests that they are acceptable for those yet to join - they aren't.

To re-iterate, the medical standards for entry differ to the medical standards within the service. Once you join, the service will do it's upmost to avoid discharging recruits and trained ranks - But prior to joining anything indicating a higher than average likelihood of recurrence could be viewed as an unacceptable risk.
 

Ross154

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Feb 17, 2009
Posts
3,558
Reaction score
22
I had an Officer app in from the start of 2009. Was a bit late for the 2009 entry batch so my medical, lasting 12 months, was booked for sometime around October or November 2009 I think. 3 days before it I was out on a run and my knee went. Was really painful. Couldn't even bend it properly. Limping home, I reluctantly decided the best thing to do now was to see how it is in the morning and then, if no better, call the AFCO and delay the medical. This I did, then I went to my GP. Several months of diagnostics later, they decided I need a small operation. This I got in summer 2010. I had another medical, no longer for an Officer app as I had now switched to OR, in November 2010 but during certain tests the Navy doc did there was still some slight pain and discomfort. I got TMU'd for 9 months "from when I'm completely symptom free". As it is, I was almost there at the medical. Only during deep squats and when he bent my leg and tried to push my knee as far to my chest as it would go was there any discomfort. A few weeks later I could do all of that pain free. Gave a 3 mile run a go to see if there was any issues and there wasn't. Took me a long time, but I didn't push it or aim for a PB. Just wanted to know if I could do a 3 miler with no pain. And I did it! So from there I started counting down from 9 months. This ended last month, but rather annoyingly, I've been really busy with work and am on holiday next week so I haven't called the AFCO back yet. Thought it wouldn't look too good if I've been trying and waiting for 3 years, to call the AFCO, say "I'm ready", them to say "Ok, interview next week" and me to say "Sorry I can't make it". So I'm leaving it for 2 more weeks then I'll be able to carry on my app. Cannot bloody wait!!
 

Stoo2k

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Apr 13, 2010
Posts
783
Reaction score
3
I will keep mine brief. I have been in the process for about 3 years now. fractured both my shins on pjft. tried to get on with it and caused many more problems as i just didnt want to stop. I have had my doctor who is ex booty to give up, my physio said the same, my orthopedic surgeon said dont bother. I had enough with people giving up on me when i have never showed a thought of it. It all came to ahead when the wife even suggested i try looking at the army or navy.
Since then (November) i have created my own gradual training program to get back on track with my running and its going really will. My legs at first were difficult to get under control nut my thoughts were, i need to train my legs into thinking there running legs again. Little and often to start with and now i am at 2.5mile distances now and can run 1.5 miles in 9 minutes 40. Just keeping it steady till i can hit 3 miles often (3-4 times a week) whilst keeping my shin in check. I used to take ibuprofen + the gel which worked to start with and now i am just stretching to keep things at bay. Think i have cracked it and aiming to give my CO a call come the end of march. Fingers crossed.
 

Illustrious

Royal Marines Commando - Moderator
Joined
May 13, 2008
Posts
2,332
Reaction score
2,415
I've temporarily stickied this thread (awaiting perm. approval from an unnamed matelot :wink:) as I believe this to be a box of morale for those disheartened individuals who feel down in the dumps due to injury. I've got my own story on injury but I've got pins and needles in my hand right now and need to stop typing sharpish.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
Good stories lads!

That's sort of my plan Ross. Should I have surgery (My physio reckons that's the only way my ankle will ever be fixed), and should it go well, I don't plan on rushing it at all. I'l start off with the old 2 mins job/2mins walk, and try and add a 2 minutes 'run' a week, up to around 30 minutes (15 on/off) - Then start going on 20 minute 'jogs'. All in all, I will give myself a good year post rehab before even thinking of applying again, and thus 'pushing it'.

I just hope I can get it fixed! Even if it means no military for me, then at least I can go on a few more ultra-marathons/adventure races around the world.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
Not really amazing news, but news nonetheless. Just got back from the doctors (a new GP, finally) and they have actually gone ahead and taken me seriously this time. I've been referred to a specialist at my local hospital. Now, if it's the same one my mate was treated by, I'm quite confident! My friend's ankle was in bits 18-24 months ago, and now he's playing football 2-3 times a week. This doctor is very highly regarded, so I'm hoping it's him! I find out the date of my appointment on Thursday*, so fingers crossed.



* This annoyed me. When I rang to book it, she said they had to wait until Thursday (despite already having all my information), as my GP had to tell them which part of the body it was. When the lady on the phone said this, I explained where it was, but she said I'd have to wait until The GP told her. Bit frustrating, but regardless, it's still progress!
 

Red Bull

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jun 10, 2010
Posts
2,020
Reaction score
8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?nomobile=1&v=HRpWQk5Tncw

this girl was paralysed from the arms down in a car crash
Thats pretty amazing. Imagine the depression and frustration she must have felt and still feel going through all that.

I see all of the commando qualities right there in that video.

Baron - I don't understand. Didn't you go to the doctors, and have your tendon tore and rebuilt? I thought you were on the way to recovery. Or am I thinking of someone else? Im sure I spoke to you about this when I was suffering my achilles troubles.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
Thats pretty amazing. Imagine the depression and frustration she must have felt and still feel going through all that.

I see all of the commando qualities right there in that video.

Baron - I don't understand. Didn't you go to the doctors, and have your tendon tore and rebuilt? I thought you were on the way to recovery. Or am I thinking of someone else? Im sure I spoke to you about this when I was suffering my achilles troubles.
Messaged you fella.
 
S

Sotiris

Guest
I'm not even sure whether to call this success or not.

In 2007 I started experiencing constant pain in my left knee. After five months I'd had enough, saw a specialist, got some orthotics. They worked well and fixed that problem.

Three weeks later, during a particularly grueling BMF session I tore the cartilage in my left knee. I refused to accept my circumstances and participated in a race up the highest mountain in South East Asia in Borneo. Ten days through the jungle then up a mountain at the end. I came second but paid quite a heavy price. The knee was absolutely wrecked and a diet of pain killers wasn't keeping the pain at bay anymore.

Surgery to fix the knee in 2009.

Since then I've been battling a maltracking patella, water on the knee, illiotibial band syndrome and tendinitis between both knees. I've fluctuated between completing a three miler return in sub nine minutes to days where I need to use a support to walk.

I will probably never serve in any Armed Forces again but I have managed to land myself a job as a manager and PTI in BMF.

It sounds cheesy but I get a lot of satisfaction from helping other lads achieve their goals in becoming soldiers or Marines. Even with the members who have no ambition to serve, you see a lot of heart, guts and determination which makes my job extremely rewarding. I never got there in the end but I think I have what it takes, mentally.

I know what it's like to live, breath and think of nothing else but the Corps. I also know what it's like to have to finally admit it's not going to work. I laugh to myself when I think it really isn't so different from being in a serious relationship.

My message would be this; The Marines aren't the be all and end all. Some of us just ain't meant to serve. But their message rings true in all walks of life. Courage, Determination, Unselfishness, Humility and Cheerfulness. Apply their ethos to whatever you are doing and you will find some success.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
One day Sotty, we shall both do it...one day.
 

DPS

Venerated Contributor
Joined
Jan 6, 2011
Posts
1,195
Reaction score
8
I just remembered a story I saw whilst on a plane back from a recent holiday. A man named Sean O'Neill was paralysed after jumping from a bridge over the River Misissippi. His brother Timmy is a rock climber and promised Sean that one day he would climb to the top of El Cap with him.

15 Years later in 2006 they made it, it meant Sean had to perform 1700 pull-ups on his specialist climbing gear. That's sheer grit and determination right there. They then decided to do some insane climb in Alaska somewhere meaning he had to perform 3000 pull-ups to the summit and make some monumental trek to the base of the climb in the first place.

I know there's a programme on it knocking around somewhere but here's a link to the story of El Cap...

El Cap

If I find the video I'll edit this post.

EDIT - Found it fairly quick but this isn't the full video with the Alaska climb in it unfortunately. You'll gather pretty quick that Timmy has an aquired taste of personality but still the achievment they made is inspiring.

El Cap Video
 

mike123

Member
Joined
Aug 7, 2010
Posts
22
Reaction score
0
over my 2 years of training for the marines i have came across alot of *text deleted* haha. shin splints was one of them which had me off running for a few months, affter i recovered from that i then had an ingrowing toenail so i had to get my two big toenails permanently removed which involved acid, which stopped me running for a few months. *text deleted** always had really stiff legs aswell which pulls at my back causing me back pain, i then damaged my hip from whatever and it hurt like hell when running, daily stretches got rid of that. then im now currently waiting for a colourblind test to be taken which *text deleted** been waiting for for 10-11 months. and theres been many more smaller *text deleted* in there along the way, i can remember when i first told people i was going to join and remembered them laughing syaing id never be able to join. well its time to prove them wrong, nothing in life worth having never came easy. hit your *text deleted* with will power and determination and nothing will stop you.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
Well lads, seeing the specialist on the 16th Feb. Given that I've already had 2 Xrays over the last couple of years on it and nothing has come up, it looks like he'll refer me straight for an MRI.

Hopefully I'll have the money at the time (?200 for private MRI and ?50 return train to London) to pay for it privately, and possibly knock 8-12 weeks off waiting times!

All going well, and if they can fix it via surgery, I'll be having an operation on it July at the latest (given The NHS 16 or 18 week rule on surgery).

I just regret not doing this when I realised 18 months ago that it really wasn't going to get better. I could have been in the application process now!

TAKE HEED OF MY WARNINGS!
 

Master_Sayer

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Posts
491
Reaction score
2
Did you go with Medical Alliance? That's who I went with and had it in Colchester which cost me ?200.
 

Master_Sayer

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Posts
491
Reaction score
2
I've dislocated my left patella like 3 times so failed my medical. I went to see a knee specialist to see the likelyhood of recurrence since my legs were much stronger. He said it looked good and referred me to have a MRI scan. Got results and been referred to a physio and got the thumbs up from them so thought it time to appeal. Handed it in to the AFCO 2 days ago and he said I should here back in about 2 or 3 weeks which is a lot quicker than I thought.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
I've dislocated my left patella like 3 times so failed my medical. I went to see a knee specialist to see the likelyhood of recurrence since my legs were much stronger. He said it looked good and referred me to have a MRI scan. Got results and been referred to a physio and got the thumbs up from them so thought it time to appeal. Handed it in to the AFCO 2 days ago and he said I should here back in about 2 or 3 weeks which is a lot quicker than I thought.
Excellent news mate, best of luck!

Out of interest, how quickly did you go back to see the specialist about your MRI?
 

Master_Sayer

Valuable Contributor
Joined
Sep 11, 2011
Posts
491
Reaction score
2
Excellent news mate, best of luck!

Out of interest, how quickly did you go back to see the specialist about your MRI?
Actually my consultant was on holiday so couldn't see him until he got back, obviously. So it was a month after the scan but it gets sent there by post I believe, so as long as that takes I guess. Ask him. I'd guess he'd probably say about a week to be safe.
My disk and report never actually got recieved by the consultant. So after a lot of hassling about and phone calls managed to get them to fax the report over. They was saying at first to the consultants secretary that they couldn't send it because she was speaking over the phone so weren't allowed to send it. I thought I haven't waited a month and paying ?100 for the appointment to not get my result so I phoned them myself and they faxed it. Never got the disc with the images though so I'm going to write a letter to get them to send it to me as that's what I was advised to do after I spoke to someone on the phone requesting the disc. I don't need it but want to see the inside of my knee out of interest for Gods sake, who wouldn't?
I strongly recommend that you double check that they have your details and your referred docs details correctly to avoid any unnecessary rubbish like I had. Also ask the doc that they're going to send it to, to write exactly how it should be written for him to definately recieve it, if you know what i mean.
 

Baron

Active Member
Joined
Jul 1, 2009
Posts
2,883
Reaction score
11
Sooooo. :) :)

Without wanting to get too ahead of myself, as I'm aware people have had diagnosis and physiotherapy before and not been successful, I got some good news today.

Saw a specialist who diagnosed it as Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction. He said that if I got that working properly again through physiotherapy and some good arch support, I should be running again in a few months time.

Now, I paid ?500 for my insoles (2 pairs of them) through a private company. According to the specialist, they are terrible..better than nothing, but still, terrible. He has booked me in for a mould and then getting some made by The NHS. There's a waiting list apparently, so may be waiting several weeks to a couple of months before I get them, but oh well.. better than surgery! (which was my initial fear).

The guy was ex-Grenadier Guards, and sympathised with my situation. I asked him straight up, would I be able to run again without pain, and would I be able to join the military. Both of which he seemed very optimistic about. He said if I nail the physiotherapy in the mean time, wear in my insoles.. then I should be running fine in a few months time.

So, some positive news at last! I'm hoping to be on the trails for Summer! :)
 

Utopia

Valuable Contributor
Joined
May 14, 2011
Posts
389
Reaction score
4
Sooooo. :) :)

Without wanting to get too ahead of myself, as I'm aware people have had diagnosis and physiotherapy before and not been successful, I got some good news today.

Saw a specialist who diagnosed it as Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction. He said that if I got that working properly again through physiotherapy and some good arch support, I should be running again in a few months time.

Now, I paid ?500 for my insoles (2 pairs of them) through a private company. According to the specialist, they are terrible..better than nothing, but still, terrible. He has booked me in for a mould and then getting some made by The NHS. There's a waiting list apparently, so may be waiting several weeks to a couple of months before I get them, but oh well.. better than surgery! (which was my initial fear).

The guy was ex-Grenadier Guards, and sympathised with my situation. I asked him straight up, would I be able to run again without pain, and would I be able to join the military. Both of which he seemed very optimistic about. He said if I nail the physiotherapy in the mean time, wear in my insoles.. then I should be running fine in a few months time.

So, some positive news at last! I'm hoping to be on the trails for Summer! :)
Congrats, thats good news! Sounds far more positive than you have been of late. Looking forward to cracking on once you've got the proper inserts I presume?
 
Top