The Common Sense Guide to Diet

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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There's so much technical detail on nutrition these days, it can get confusing for people who are new to health/fitness or who just want to see the facts as they stand. This is a simple 11-point list which isn't meant for dieting/bodybuilding/etc extremists but is designed for someone who wants to be in a healthy BMI or BF% range without too much fuss:

1. No matter what you end up eating, if you eat more calories than you burn you will gain weight and if you eat less than you burn you will lose weight.

2. It's important to have a balanced diet and not go to extremes for extended periods of time - change your lifestyle in general, rather than on/off crash dieting.

3. Aim to have roughly 1 handful of wholemeal carbs with each meal.

4. Aim to have a serving of green veggies with each meal, or at least with lunch and tea.

5. Stick between 2-3 portions of fruit per day. This should cover most of your vitamins, fiber and the right amount of 'good' sugars without having too much. Even when it's 'good', too much sugar is a bad thing.

6. Aim to have a serving of protein with each meal. This could be 2 boiled eggs for breakfast, chicken in your sandwiches at lunch and some mince on your pasta at tea.

7. There is always debate about how many meals per day is best but people have been in good shape for many years by having 3 square meals a day, maybe 4 if you lead a particularly demanding lifestyle. Aim to make breakfast big and lunch your smallest meal. If you want to eat several small meals, go for it, but don't be scared of the tradition 3-meals-a-day idea.

8. Fat is not the enemy. Too much of anything is bad but it's important to get a mixture of fats in your diet. Don't shy away from butter or olive oil and enjoy the odd bit of fat on a piece of meat. Continued #9 below:

9. Have some common sense when you cheat. Going for a few drinks and a kebab with the lads on a Friday won't kill you. Doing it 7 days a week will. It's actually a good idea to let go every now and again - it spikes the metabolism and keeps you sane, but doing it every day is daft.

10. Stay hydrated. Drink enough water throughout the day that your urine stays clear and barely smells at all.

11. Just enjoy food. Follow the above points but do it to your own recipes & your own tastes. Changing your body and fitness shouldn't be a chore, it should be a pleasure.



Hope this helps. There's bound to be someone who'll reply saying I'm talking nonsense but as a general guide it should keep you out of hospital and give you a pleasurable experience with food.
 

Grimmey

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So true about number 9 haha, you get people that try and be sensible for ever and go insane one day and eat their own body weight in junk food, when in reality once a week or fortnight keeps you satisfied(well should).
 

Utopia

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This was pretty much my conclusion from the health seminar I mentioned in the other thread. If you really want to live a perfect lifestyle with perfect nutrition, then the summary is that living is actually quite unhealthy and maybe being dead would be better for you!

Life's too short for anal nutrition plans and being difficult at restaurants and not enjoying yourself when (WHEN) you do go out. Eat sensible, nothing in excess. Doing as you mentioned in the above 11 points people who be happier, healthier, and a whole lot more sane!
 
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stokey_14

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I agree with keeping it simple, I agree with pretty much everything in this thread. However I think there is a number of folk, my self included who enjoy the intricacies of nutrition. Sort of using my body as a science project and seeing what I can get out of it.

Also if elite performance is what you want and your not a genetic freek your going to need all the help you can get.

If you have no desire to follow the more complex dietary plans, fine you can achieve a very good level of fitness and health with a solid simple diet. I wouldn?t however knock those who wish to put more time and effort into it due to necessity or for enjoyment.

Those with a wish to look there best with out there kit on would also be wise to nerd up nutritionally?more than one way to skin a banana!

Stokey
 

Utopia

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I agree with keeping it simple, I agree with pretty much everything in this thread. However I think there is a number of folk, my self included who enjoy the intricacies of nutrition. Sort of using my body as a science project and seeing what I can get out of it.

Also if elite performance is what you want and your not a genetic freek your going to need all the help you can get.

If you have no desire to follow the more complex dietary plans, fine you can achieve a very good level of fitness and health with a solid simple diet. I wouldn?t however knock those who wish to put more time and effort into it due to necessity or for enjoyment.

Those with a wish to look there best with out there kit on would also be wise to nerd up nutritionally?more than one way to skin a banana!Stokey
You'll appreciate this then...

Vitamin C. We are one of four species that cannot produce it naturally within our bodies.

IF you supplement you can probably hit about 100mg a day.

A goat for example can produce upto 100,000mg in 24hrs from it's diet.

Vitamin C in high dosages has been linked to leaner body composition and a reduction in fat. There have been cases whereby atheletes have been put on a Vit C drip at around 10,000mg an hour while they sleep. Within a week there was a significant reduction in body fat and an improvement in performance, but the major improvement was recovery periods after prolonged intense exercise, far exceeding their training upto this point.

Vit C has a halflife of around 30mins in the body therefore it is necessary to take supplements more often that once or twice a day. Preferably between meals and with additional magnesium and zinc to allow efficient useage of it.

Anywhere between 5000mg-10000mg is a good place to start and work from there.

Best thing is that it's dirt cheap, and seeing as we cannot produce is anyway, there is no danger of suppressing a natural function..

*Thread jack over...
 
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stokey_14

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You'll appreciate this then...

Vitamin C. We are one of four species that cannot produce it naturally within our bodies.

IF you supplement you can probably hit about 100mg a day.

A goat for example can produce upto 100,000mg in 24hrs from it's diet.

Vitamin C in high dosages has been linked to leaner body composition and a reduction in fat. There have been cases whereby atheletes have been put on a Vit C drip at around 10,000mg an hour while they sleep. Within a week there was a significant reduction in body fat and an improvement in performance, but the major improvement was recovery periods after prolonged intense exercise, far exceeding their training upto this point.

Vit C has a halflife of around 30mins in the body therefore it is necessary to take supplements more often that once or twice a day. Preferably between meals and with additional magnesium and zinc to allow efficient useage of it.

Anywhere between 5000mg-10000mg is a good place to start and work from there.

Best thing is that it's dirt cheap, and seeing as we cannot produce is anyway, there is no danger of suppressing a natural function..

*Thread jack over...

Very interesting. I?ve only really ever supplemented it when ill or training through the winter months but that sounds quite promising? Thanks!

I also take vit D3 (in the winter) and Zinc (year round) to help with the old immune system. Barring a stomach bug I got only a few weeks ago I can?t remember the last time I was ill?

Please note I may take these vitamins along with fish oil but it is on top of what I believe is a solid diet getting plate full?s of Greens and plenty of fruit/ organic produce.

Stokey
 

VTomasi

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The simple principles are good to have in mind and as a starting point.

Nutrition is, however, the most fundamental aspect of performance and training. As Stokey said, for those seeking high level performance, seeking to cut weight and build lean muscle + tone up, it is necessary to develop a more complex, targeted diet plan.

On vitamins, I take Alpha Men from myprotein.com which has the following shopping list of elements :

Amount per 2 tablet serving:
346mg Calcium, 140mg Phosphorus, 80mg Vitamin C, 100iu Vitamin E, 36mg Fatty acids, 24mg Magnesium (from magnesium oxide), 25mg Choline, 50mg Pantothenic acid, 10mg Ginsennosides, 25mg Potassium, 26mg Magnesium (from magnesium oxide), 25mg Vitamin B3, 25.5mg Alpha Lipoic Acid, 25.5mg Royal Jelly, 8.75mg Herperidin, 50?g Vanadium, 80?g Selenium, 20mg Kelp, 4.8mg Ginkgoflavoglycosides, 1.2mg Terpene lactones, 15mg Zinc, 12.5mg Vitamin B1, 12.5mg Vitamin B6, 3mg Beta carotene (Equivalent to 500?g Vitamin A), 1500?g Manganese, 12.5mg Vitamin B2, 11.88mg Polyphenols, 12.5mg Inositol, 12.5mg Bromelain, 12.5mg Lipase, 12.5mg Papain, 500?g Boron, 250?g Copper, 2.5mg Amylase, 2.5mg Co Q10, 5?g(100iu) Vitamin D, 250?g Lutein 100?g Chromium, 25?g Vitamin K, 25?g Molybdenum, 400?g Folic acid, 150?g Biotin, 125?g Vitamin B12.

Pretty comprehensive!
 

MacheteMeetsBiscuit

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VTomasi

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Essentially, the simple good diet, is a not-so-strict Paleo diet. Basic principles of good food, just not so anal about everything.
 
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stokey_14

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The utter thief! :laugh:

But yeah it's certainly a good one to follow as a long-term plan. Carb cycling is brilliant as a rapid fat-loss tool but would be difficult to maintain over several years whereas this "Simple Diet" is more like a lifestyle.


Agree and disagree, once you get used to carb cycling, reach you desired weight or wish to maintain it?s actually very simple to follow. For example after my holiday (a short term motivational goal to help me diet down) I?ll maybe introduce 1 extra moderate carb day + the odd extra spoon full of nut butter and that should on top of what I eat now lead me to level out. Maintaining my desired weight and body fat.

I truly do not suffer any lack of energy or negative side effect from carb cycling.

But I do agree a simple diet is easier to cope with than carb cycling or other such types of diet. Just for me the results aren?t quite as drastic? personal preference I guess

Stokey
 

Utopia

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I personally find carb-cycling (back-loading) one of the easiest 'diets' to live with. I'd much rather have strict principles that I know I can adhere to for most of the day, then in the evening, enjoy my carbs.

It gets results, it certainly 'clicks' with me, and I get to live a normal life rather than one stressed to the max by anal diets, supplement timing and when I want to go out and enjoy myself (drinking) I can get away with it.
 
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