The Stitch Thread...

Jay22

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Right, we all know this anoying one. I know there are lots of theorys as to what a stitch really is. But what really matters is how to prevent them.
Post your experiences with stitches and how you have delt with with them, whats the best method of decreasing the likleyhood of getting one etc...

I find that if i don't eat for a long time before I run I won't get one. Although there has been one or two occations where I have. When I've had a stitch I slow my pace down a tiny bit until it subsides, then i bring my pace back up once its at tolerable level.

Jay
 

MasoN

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I never drink 30 minutes before a run or i get a killer stitch!
 

Watson

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Well halfway through my run last night, i got a stitch :cry:
I carried on for 5 mins, got slightly pissed off so went flat out as far as i could.
When i brought it back into a jog the stitch was gone :shock:
Only tried it once but Hopefully it will work again
 

Plummy

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i used to have a coach who never let me stop running as i was the tubby one in my team i was only 14 i used to get a stich and he always told me to push it in as hard as you can with one or two hands your be surprised it actually gets rid of it, put pressure on the area and hold it there dig deep and it will go
 

james1432

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you might already now this but just thaught id add..... the reason you get a stitch while running/exerciseing is because blood that is in the digestive system,'helping to digest food' is drawn away to be used by the muscles which need it while exercising this causes your digestive system to 'lock up' so to speak causing pain around that area-stitch. so obviously if you can dont eat too soon before exerciseing and if you do, eat foods that dont take long to digest eg low fat as this takes the longest to digest. :) hope this is of use.
 

Jay22

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Did a 10k run route around my area today. I didnt time myself with a stop watch but when i got in and looking at the clock i etimated i had done it in about 43 minutes. I got a stitch at about 7k and i tryed the digging your fingers in technique and found it to work as long as you control your breathing with deep breaths. Cheers for the tip.

6 weeks till PRMC.

Jay.
 

james1432

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i also tried the digging fingers in technique it seemed to work fine until i stopped pressing then a couple of minutes later came back? i then got told by a running partner to crouch down and hug my knee tightly on the same side as the stitch for about 30sec, again seemed to work for a while but i just ended up having to ignore it while i finishd my run.
 

Rob

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lord_carl said:
MasoN said:
I never drink 30 minutes before a run or i get a killer stitch!

your going to hate RT then
What a nasty little comment to make lord carl. And what did it accomplish? let the lad find out for himself and leave some 'helpful' feedback for a change.
 

alan wilson

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Rob said:
lord_carl said:
MasoN said:
I never drink 30 minutes before a run or i get a killer stitch!

your going to hate RT then
What a nasty little comment to make lord carl. And what did it accomplish? let the lad find out for himself and leave some 'helpful' feedback for a change.
agreed!
 

lord_carl

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I simply say it because you are ALWAYS Drinking down there evan moments before you go for runs, In the gym and after Fizz
On average you should be drinking 8 field bottles of water a day or u simply fall by the wayside

You may question my methods of adressing situations but is this because i ranted at your whining back in the other thread or because i didend put a :*text deleted*: to make the comments more socialy acceptable

C
 

Rob

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actually lord carl i called you pathetic with a cheeky little smile but the admin moved it :*text deleted*:
 

gleneagles

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OK, I signed up to this site (usually use mfat.co.uk) just to tell you guys exactly what a stitch is and how to prevent/stop one.

What a Stitch is!!

When we run the impact on our organs causes them to bounce around inside us. The heart and lungs are held in place by the ribs therefore we don't get a stitch in our chest. However, the Liver and Stomach are not protected by bone but are held in place by our abs (stomach muscles). This allows them to move around more as no matter how perfect you may think your abs are they are never as solid as bone. They are in turn connected to the diaphragm (the strange device that makes us breathe) by tendons. A stitch is actually the strain felt on the continual pulling of these tendons as the organs bounce up and down with each stride. The worst stitch you can get is always on the right hand side right fellas. Well this is because the Liver is the heaviest organ in the midsection of our bodies therefore putting the most strain on the right hand tendons.

Theories on how to stop it!

Breathing techniques can prevent it. For example, for three strides breathe in and then for two strides breathe out! This distributes pressure on the organs and tendons.

Increase your abdominal muscle on the sides (the weakest part).

Increase Lower back muscles (look to perform some hyper-extensions).

When you have a stitch grasp the hurting side with the thumb on the back and fingers on the front then lean slightly to that side and take deep breaths and breath out quickly causing your diaphragm to stretch.

Prior to running you should practice breathing slowly and deeply as this will stretch the tendons and diaphragm and allow them to increase in strength.

Also, drinking water and staying hydrated (even during a run) will prevent the Lactic Acid to build up and allow a SHORT break to catch some o2.

You could slow the pace down (even to a fast walk if need be) untill the diaphragm has replenished its oxygen supply and loosened again. Then get straight back to it lads.

The reason I know all this fellas is that I was plagued by the worst stitches in the world and went to my doc for advice. This is what he told me and what I have researched! It worked immediately. Hope its helped.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Hello Gleneagles & Welcome to the site, good to see you here.

Many thanks for the advice- I'm sure many will find it usefull. Please join in as you see fit- all advice welcome.
 

Ashley

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Stiches?

When I run I often get a sharp sensation either in my shoulder or in my lower ribs. It's always my left side and it doesn't help when I'm trying to go for good times. I've tried stretching my shoulders and neck before I run but it always happens around the 1 mile mark and fades at 3 miles and continues very faintly for the remainder of my run.

Any suggestions? It's been happening ever since I remember and put it down to being unfit but I'm not exactly unfit anymore.

Ash
 

Zefan

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There are some organs attached to your diaphragm, which moves up and down when you inhale and exhale. As you run however, the organs (I think it's the stomach and liver) bounce around too. It's when the organs are pulling down and your diaphragm is pulling up that you et a "Stitch" or "Side stitch" as it is also known.

What you're getting doesn't sound like a stitch, it sounds like a lack of core strength. I have the same problem, I used to have pretty bad cramping in my upper back when running, but it has lessened over time and is now barely noticeable unless I'm 'extra phys' myself.

If you're sure it's a stitch, try inhaling and exhaling only when your left foot is impacting the floor.
 

Lloydy101

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i also found that my core was a bit out!! i did alot of prone bridges and of coarse sit ups!!

when i know its a stitch i hold my knee up on what every side the stitch is on and it goes in a about 5 6 seconds
 

MeridiaNx

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Just chipping in here with something lurking in my memory that I'm sure I read once.

From what I remember, it said that the 'traditional' stitch (as opposed to the one in your shoulder you mention) was caused by compression on the liver, and only the liver. It also said that because your liver is only on one side of your torso, it is caused when your breathing cycle coincides with your stride pattern in a certain way. As I say I can't remember the details, but it was something along the lines of when you land on your right foot it compresses the right hand side of the torso, if this happens as you breath in, with the lungs expanding and the diaphragm moving downwards, the liver gets squashed between the two.

This may be complete bull, and maybe it was the other way around and not the left foot, but I'm sure it said if you make sure you breath in on a certain foot landing all the time, you wouldn't get a stitch.

Kinda makes sense in that I can't think I've *ever* had a stitch while swimming or cycling, no matter how knackered, only running.
 

MeridiaNx

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Aha, having done some more reading, it seems Zefan was right about the organs pulling down on the diaphragm part but it *is* most commonly the liver. The most interesting bit though is this:

"Certain athletes also report a pain in the tip of their shoulder blade. This is believed to be because this is a referred site of pain for the diaphragm via the phrenic nerve."

So it seems like both your stitches are one and the same thing really. Also, the breathing/stride thing I mentioned apparently isn't quite as loony as I had feared. A possible cure for them is given as follows, among others:

"While running, exhale when your foot strikes on the side that the side stitch is located. For example, a side stitch on the right, exhale hard when your right foot strikes the ground." EDIT: As Zefan already mentioned but I completely overlooked ;-p

Check Wikipedia (fount of all knowledge) for more info.
 
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