Things that annoy you. Your rants.

J9R4W

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Bristol as a city at the moment.

From the ripping down of the Colston Statue, the anti-lockdown protests, the graffiti done to an NHS Nurse's car (saying "Don't call 999") to the recent riots with violence against police and burning of police vans in the 'Kill the bill' 'protests'. And that's only the last year. I don't know what's going on but it's like over the last 5 years in particular the city has been invaded by a bunch of militant leftists. Yeah you've always had a massive hippie/lefty culture in Bristol, but not with this violent edge. I hope the police get a grip of it soon and start to fight fire with fire. Rant over.
 

Chelonian

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Arguably, one of the biggest factors influencing the growth of Islam in northern Africa was the brutal cruelty associated with Christianity's determination to dominate.
 

Chelonian

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Religion and faith generally interests me. As does philosophy. They are powerful societal influences.

I was raised in a devout Roman Catholic community The one practical benefit is that if a Jehovah's Witness 'knocker' arrives on my doorstep they leave as soon as I mention this. :)

But even as a young child I never understood why any of the Gods would be so needy of worship.
 

Tetley

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@Chelonian Religion and philosophy, then we need a little 18th century French philosophy.
As Voltaire said ‘If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him.’ The idea being that existence of God (or the belief therein) helps establish social order. It’s a thought.

I don’t think there is a problem with the principals of organised religions but with the slavish devotions to arcane and self serving interpretations.
 

J9R4W

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Fair play I just assumed based on ancient cultural advancement in the Middle East, nothing fact based.
Yeah fair it’s obviously a massive/complex part of history. Lots of religious sites in the Middle East changed hands over the centuries e.g., from Jewish to Christian and Christian to Muslim. One example being the Hagia Sophia mosque in then Byzantium now Istanbul. It was a church but was sacked and converted to Islam. Similar things happened when the Romans arrived in Jerusalem.
 

J9R4W

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@Chelonian Religion and philosophy, then we need a little 18th century French philosophy.
As Voltaire said ‘If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him.’ The idea being that existence of God (or the belief therein) helps establish social order. It’s a thought.

I don’t think there is a problem with the principals of organised religions but with the slavish devotions to arcane and self serving interpretations.
I always liked the quote “A little philosophy inclineth man's mind to atheism, but depth in philosophy bringeth men's minds about to religion”. I think that’s how it’s gone for me - I’m certainly not an expert but the more I learn about it all the more it’s appealed to me and made sense.
 

CallMeLucifer

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Fair play I just assumed based on ancient cultural advancement in the Middle East, nothing fact based.
You'd be surprised how prevalent Christianity was/ is in the middle east. Up until the 1200s CE, Egypt was a Christian country. It's now 10% of the population, the largest by total numbers in the middle east. With Lebanon being the largest in percentage, something under 50%.
 

CallMeLucifer

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@Chelonian Religion and philosophy, then we need a little 18th century French philosophy.
As Voltaire said ‘If God did not exist, it would be necessary to invent him.’ The idea being that existence of God (or the belief therein) helps establish social order. It’s a thought.

I don’t think there is a problem with the principals of organised religions but with the slavish devotions to arcane and self serving interpretations.
The validity of deities existing has been around even during the time of the Greek states.

As Epicurus said:

Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?
 

Chelonian

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I don’t think there is a problem with the principals of organised religions...
Agreed. It's the flawed human interpretation of diverse religious scriptures which are problematic for me.

But I keep returning to the question 'Why are the Gods apparently so needy of worship?'
The narcissistic desperation of deities hardly inspires confidence.
 

thirdtry

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Agreed. It's the flawed human interpretation of diverse religious scriptures which are problematic for me.

But I keep returning to the question 'Why are the Gods apparently so needy of worship?'
The narcissistic desperation of deities hardly inspires confidence.

Agreed on this. Surely the whole idea of religion (or philosophy for that matter) is to inspire change and/or wisdom from within, so dramatic outwards worship has always baffled me.

I sound like I'm fully turning Buddhist here and lining myself up to be the Dalai Lama as a fallback haha but I'll use that again as an example of one I think gets a free pass for the whole worship thing. As my Thai colleague explained to me when I stayed in his village for a bit and visited his local temple - the reason they worship and idolise the Buddha (often with gold or gold-painted icons) is because they idolise him as a man, not a God, for what he achieved and the message he spread. An apt comparison for a military forum - consider it like a very inflated version of why one salutes an officer or addresses them as Sir, or why almost any of us hero-worship and idolise VC recipients, or even why as Recruits at CTC there's an almost-godlike worship of the Green Beret and those that wear it. Buddha gets 'saluted' with the Namaste hand signal and a bow of the head, and earned his respect for achieving 'enlightenment'. I.e. Buddhists believe he basically defined the perfect human character.


Absolutely wacky comparison I've just made there so forgive me, Friday night after a whiskey, but it made sense in my head!
 

Chelonian

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Another aspect of many monotheistic religions is that of eternal life when we have shuffled off this mortal coil.

My interpretation of the deal (and that's what it appears to be) is that belief and worship are exchanged for eternal existence in a better place. Which suggests that many faiths are truly transactional relationships. Terms and conditions certainly apply.

If the promise of eternal existence was withdrawn how many believers would continue to worship the Gods?
 

Ninja_Stoker

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As Epicurus said:

Is God willing to prevent evil, but not able? Then he is not omnipotent. Is he able, but not willing? Then he is malevolent. Is he both able and willing? Then whence cometh evil?
Is he neither able nor willing? Then why call him God?
I like that, not seen it before.

Then again I like this, too:

FB_IMG_1615762154788.jpg
But I keep returning to the question 'Why are the Gods apparently so needy of worship?'
The narcissistic desperation of deities hardly inspires confidence.
Agreed. Likewise the followers who wish to emulate their imaginary, mythological being.
 

J9R4W

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Bristol as a city at the moment. From the ripping down of the Colston Statue, the anti-lockdown protests, the graffiti done to an NHS Nurse's car (saying "Don't call 999") to the recent riots with violence against police and burning of police vans in the 'Kill the bill' 'protests'. And that's only the last year. I don't know what's going on but it's like over the last 5 years in particular the city has been invaded by a bunch of militant leftists. Yeah you've always had a massive hippie/lefty culture in Bristol, but not with this violent edge. I hope the police get a grip of it soon and start to fight fire with fire. Rant over.
Sorry not quite done here - what’s actually annoying is that the people who were there making a song and dance about ‘clapping for the NHS’ and criticising the government on how they handle the NHS are the same ones out rioting in the city centre and spreading the virus. They’re happy to just mug the NHS off when it suits them, like the hypocrites they are. Okay rant finally over.
 
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