Told my dad about my intentions to join

bigsprinter05

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I've been wanting to join for about 6 months now. At this point i'm certain i want to join, so i told my parents. My mum is fine with it (albeit a little apprehensive), but my dad's been chewing my ears off saying i'm just 'cannon fodder' etc. It doesn't change my mind but i'm 15 and i plan on joining at 17, so i don't really want a year and a half of this. Any thoughts on how to convince him?
 

03092014

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Wait until you are 18, get some A-levels and then you can apply without his permission anyway.

But in all honesty getting some decent education will gen pay dividends in the long run, trust me.
 

bigsprinter05

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Thanks for the quick reply. I'm studying 2 A-levels at the moment and will finish them by November next year. Do you need both parents permission to apply or just one ?
 

Massey

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Might sound abit daft, but would people recommend joining a local army reserve unit, before joining the marines?

Naturally I've looked at joining RMR, but the logistics of it are unfeasible. Due to this, I've thought about joining a local army reserve in catterick e.g. Until I finish my apprenticeship and join regular marines in 3 years time?

Just wondered people's thoughts on this.
 

Vine

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Might sound abit daft, but would people recommend joining a local army reserve unit, before joining the marines?

Naturally I've looked at joining RMR, but the logistics of it are unfeasible. Due to this, I've thought about joining a local army reserve in catterick e.g. Until I finish my apprenticeship and join regular marines in 3 years time?

Just wondered people's thoughts on this.
Army reserve and Royal marines RT as miles apart regards standards, would help with things like weapons handling tests etc but would give you bad habits that could hinder you in the long run it's a bit of a double edged sword not to mention a absolute admin nightmare regards passing information over if I'm honest I wouldn't bother as the actual transferable things you can use are minimal.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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If you are under 18 you need permission from the parent/guardian you live with.

If living with both, both signatures are required.

The tip is show your parents how much you want it by training regularly over the interim period and involve them at each stage. Many parents, if not all, have reservations but you very often find they turn out to be not only the most supportive, but also the proudest parents if you reach King's Squad.
 

Caversham

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Get your Dad to join the forum and we can add him to the Parents and Partners sub forum. He will be able to make a sound judgement call on your aspirations.

Alan
 

Chelonian

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Any thoughts on how to convince him?

Parents do worry; it's a big part of the job and understandable.

Issues such as educational opportunities, pay and promotion, career advancement, risk, welfare and pensions :eek: often whiz over the aspiring candidate's head.
Information about all the above and pointers to other credible sources are available in the P&P sub-forum as suggested by @Caversham
 

Duality

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I was onboard with my son joining and at the start of the process, my husband wasn't. He probably used some of the same statements your dad is using. If my son had went officer route, he would have been happier but he decided, after a lot of thought, other rank was for him.
Now that he's at Lympstone and my husband sees how much the training team puts into teaching and looking after the nods, he's happier with it. I don't think he'll ever be completely onboard but he knows it's what our boy has wanted for as long as we can remember.
I signed all my sons paperwork. His dad didn't sign any but it was never an issue or flagged up. My son was asked how both parents felt and he was honest. He had a careers officer that was happy to talk if we had questions.
You're a way off joining so as others have said, finish school - it will help. Also research everything you can about the corps. Your dad will be concerned you haven't fully thought through your path so if it's what you really want, you have to show as far as possible, you know what you're getting into.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Now that he's at Lympstone and my husband sees how much the training team puts into teaching and looking after the nods, he's happier with it. I don't think he'll ever be completely onboard but he knows it's what our boy has wanted for as long as we can remember.
I signed all my sons paperwork. His dad didn't sign any but it was never an issue or flagged up. My son was asked how both parents felt and he was honest. He had a careers officer that was happy to talk if we had questions.

Good to see all is going well. One thing worth bearing in mind is your husband later says he wants him to leave, then as long as they live(d) in the same household, it usually doable up to week 26.
 

Duality

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Good to see all is going well. One thing worth bearing in mind is your husband later says he wants him to leave, then as long as they live(d) in the same househol, it usually doable up to week 26

I didn't know that.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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I didn't know that.
I've never seen it actually done, but a legal parent or guardian of a minor should give written consent. It's written on the consent paper (MOD form 486).

If they didn't give consent, they could submit a legal challenge.
 

ThreadpigeonsAlpha

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Might sound abit daft, but would people recommend joining a local army reserve unit, before joining the marines?

Naturally I've looked at joining RMR, but the logistics of it are unfeasible. Due to this, I've thought about joining a local army reserve in catterick e.g. Until I finish my apprenticeship and join regular marines in 3 years time?

Just wondered people's thoughts on this.

No. They shouldn’t be recommending this. It really winds me up when people suggest this to impressionable young lads.

The Reserve forces have their own role to fill. They are not a stop gap, or a place for work experience.

The reserves don’t appreciate it, losing man power after spending time and money to train you. And when you start recruit training you will have bad habits, or even bad attitudes that will not help you. Not to mention you will he spotted by the training team.

There’s some negative encounters of lads in recruit training who have served before, with Bad attitudes and just causing grief for themselves. (Much the same with ex cadets). If you are, then it’s best to keep your mouth shut about it.

You don’t need “work experience” to join the Forces, that’s what “recruit training” is for.
 
B

Blackers

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What he said above! The TA, sorry AR, isn’t a stepping stone. What a waste of time it would be for all concerned. But if you are seeking experience and not able to comitt to full time then Infantry is the only way to go. What you need to be doing is to square away your basic drills; learn how to clean a rifle really well, platoon harbour drills, platoon attacks and your role in them, how to live from a Bergan as an infantryman, learn from the NCOs about how to conduct yourself as a soldier, map reading and importantly ..... learning that *text deleted* ups from the chain of command have a very real impact on soldiers.
So, "they" may be peeved when you leave for RM - so what ?? Do you think that RM staff are going to consider the opinion of some "peeved" NCO from XX Rifles for more than a nano second?
 

Royal2010

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'cannon fodder'

Is normally quoted by people with absolutely zero idea of how infantry work never mind 'elite' infantry.
The term, for those who don't know, the phrase came about around the Napoleonic wars when infantry was set into line formation and well-drilled and easy targets. Through the ages, the cannon was effective but less so as infantry weapons progressed.
In the year 2020, you are less susceptible to the ol' cannon. I've had a few things come my way, but not artillery, and if you join without WWIII kicking off the chances of you being "cannon fodder" is very
very
slim

You're a way off joining so as others have said, finish school - it will help. Also research everything you can about the corps. Your dad will be concerned you haven't fully thought through your path so if it's what you really want, you have to show as far as possible, you know what you're getting into.

This is a very good point. Finish school, go to college, explore the world, get a job. Live the beginning of your life before you join. Young teenagers that join up usually fall by the wayside and for the reason they are so immature. The number of times I have seen this in person would, if it were me, up the age limit to 20 years old to reduce the amount of wastage.
 
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