too old/ young for officer training?

South Shields SAFC

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For the past six months or so i have been thinking of apply for officers training after I complete my degree in 2010, I'll be 23 years old and if all goes to plan would like to begin training in september 2010. Just wondering if this is a young/ old age for a new recruit officer? Also I have never had any experience with the military or the marines before, will this matter?

Does it matter what subject im studying at degree level too? Or is it simply a measure of if your capable of studying at that level?

I appreciate any advice that you lads can give.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Welcome the site. As the age range for Officer is 17~26, being 23 is neither too old or young, and at risk of repeating Goldilocks: "Just right".

A degree isn't required, but just about doubles your starting income. As it isn't required, you are advised to consider a degree which will be of use to you in the civilian job market when you leave.

Officer training is around 14 months & no previous experience is required, but the URNU or OTC may help give you an insight.
 

FromtheGlos

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OTC is definately a good shout, as it builds up leadership skills, fitness and a general understanding of how military life works. Good luck with it.
 

South Shields SAFC

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Welcome the site. As the age range for Officer is 17~26, being 23 is neither too old or young, and at risk of repeating Goldilocks: "Just right".

A degree isn't required, but just about doubles your starting income. As it isn't required, you are advised to consider a degree which will be of use to you in the civilian job market when you leave.

Officer training is around 14 months & no previous experience is required, but the URNU or OTC may help give you an insight.

Just another thing mate, what would the starting income be with and without a completed degree? Why does a completed degree effect your wage?
 

a flying dodo

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Just another thing mate, what would the starting income be with and without a completed degree? Why does a completed degree effect your wage?

14k with no degree, 28k with one.

Not too sure on that second one. Might be something to do with learning abilities, or maybe they want you to join and with a degree under your belt 14k is poor?
 

Ninja_Stoker

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The differing wage scales used to be based on age and qualifications. nowadays it's based on qualifications alone.

The Royal Navy/Royal Marines are 7th on the list of top UK employers offering the best graduate starting salaries.

The idea is that if you join after year 11 as an Other Rank having finished GCSE's, you start on £13,013 rising to £16, 227 after 26 weeks.

Alternatively join as an Officer after A Levels on £14,852 rising to £23,475 after you complete training.

Finally if you join with a Degree, you start on £28,216 (and possibly have £15-20K student debt)

If you join with the minimum qualifications at the earliest opportunity, you are financially better off but the later you leave it after reaching the peak of your academic achievement the less attractive the wage. The only way to entice graduates is to offer a wage competitive with the top civilian salaries.

The older people get, the more financial burden they take on & the less likely they are able to afford a drop in income. Many people over 26 cannot afford to start on £13,013 & choose instead to join the RMR so as they can continue to earn a civilian wage. If however, you join the Marines early, you can easily be earning £30K+ before you reach 26, no matter what qualifications you join with.
 

Ninja_Stoker

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If you join as an Officer it depends what qualifications you have from the outset. Pay rises incrementally from the bottom scale to the passing-out top scale of the joining pay indicated on the (link): Rates of Pay leaflet.

Officer training is nearer 14 months than 18, unless you have setbacks along the way.
 
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