Trail running shoes

ALDL9RM

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Going to start making my longer runs trail runs rather than road runs - I'm after a bit of advice on a decent pair of trail runners that dont cost a bomb? Cheers
 

Caversham

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All the big names do trail running shoes. The thing to be aware of is that the cushioning will not be as good as road shoes, purely because if you're running on trails and off road then the ground will be softer.

The problems come when you have a mixture of the two in one outing. I found that if I was running on Dartmoor then I put a pair of normal trainers in my day sack if I had to go on metalled roads for any length of time, as with the lack of cushioning my feet felt like raw meat after a few miles.

Alan
 

Chelonian

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I'm after a bit of advice on a decent pair of trail runners that dont cost a bomb?
Echo what @Caversham said.

If you are happy with the fit of your current brand of road shoe I'd take a look at that brand's range of trail shoes first because fit is what matters most. There is no such thing as a 'standard' fit.
For example, Adidas are comparatively narrowly shaped shoes while New Balance sizes seem to be one whole size smaller than others.
Try a shoe on first even if you then look for a better price elsewhere.

Consider last year's model and style. Such shoes are often sold cheaper.

My trails are almost always coastal paths which are a mixture of terrain: sand, shingle, mud, foliage, woodland, etc. Because I am a skinflint I often use my worn out road runners for trails. They do the job and I don't care if they get trashed.
Once they are too wänked out even for that I give 'em a good clean and wear them indoors at home as slippers.

2015 Brooks Ghost runners. Now retired. :)

Photo0644.jpg
 

deerhunter909

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If I were you I would go to your local shoe store (apart from sports direct) because those people know more about shoes than anyone else, and its always better to try a pair on. But you could check out the Altura lone peak, they have a zero-drop heel which means your feet sit completely flat, It can take some time to get used to, and if you beast yourself on the first couple runs I would imagine that you would get injured, so take it slow. This zero drop is advantageous because if you get used to it it will strengthen all the tendons and stabilizer muscles because you are using your feet as they are meant to be used, which means your less likely to get injured during your RM training. Another zero drop shoe is Vibram five fingers, never tried them and they are pretty expensive, (basically a piece of rubber with a sock on top). As I said go to your local store and try a pair on, and do keep in mind you can't really get a cheap trail shoe. but for now, during this corona crisis, regular road shoes should be fine for some light trail use, and there is no reason why you couldn't run barefoot, remember that its the way we are meant to run and how our ancestors did it!
 

Mattys

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I’m currently in need of a new pair of running trainers now that im doing it more frequent.

Over the last few years I’ve always had new balance running trail trainers similar to the ones in the link but of course there new and improved versions!.
Now I’m not sure but never thought anything of it or even questioned it but is using trail running trainers on just a normal flat grass field or a road not what there ment for!?

https://www.mandmdirect.com/01/deta...-Mens-MT590-V4-Trail-Running-Shoes-Rosin-Blue

https://www.mandmdirect.com/01/deta...-Mens-Nitrel-V3-Trail-Running-Shoes-Red-Black

I’ve been looking at these as it’s what I’m used to but as I’ll eventually be doing longer runs are these the wrong sort of footwear to have for this?
Or any suggestions of ones that are great to have?

Much appreciated
 

Chelonian

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Now I’m not sure but never thought anything of it or even questioned it but is using trail running trainers on just a normal flat grass field or a road not what there ment for!?
Trail running shoes often have a different tread pattern to shoes which will more often be used on roads or paths. Both shoes in your links have the classic trail shoe 'nuggets' which presumably grip wet, muddy surfaces and also shed the mud.

In winter wet weather a 'trail pattern tread' might offer more than a marginal improvement in traction off road. In current dry weather where trails are as compacted and hard as a road the difference is possibly difficult to notice.

I wear standard 'road pattern tread' running shoes for just about every running terrain. Sometimes I fall over or trip over my own feet.
Just my viewpoint. Hopefully others will chip in with their own experience and opinions.
 

Mattys

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Trail running shoes often have a different tread pattern to shoes which will more often be used on roads or paths. Both shoes in your links have the classic trail shoe 'nuggets' which presumably grip wet, muddy surfaces and also shed the mud.

In winter wet weather a 'trail pattern tread' might offer more than a marginal improvement in traction off road. In current dry weather where trails are as compacted and hard as a road the difference is possibly difficult to notice.

I wear standard 'road pattern tread' running shoes for just about every running terrain. Sometimes I fall over or trip over my own feet.
Just my viewpoint. Hopefully others will chip in with their own experience and opinions.
Cheer for that detailed response!

As the field I run on is currently rock solid just got me thinking is trail trainers the best for these and as I’m very light footed always running in my toes and rarely ever the heel touches the ground I’m just not sure what the difference is between £170 Nike running trainers or £35 random make ones are!
 

Caversham

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Trail shoes take into account that the ground you are running on will be forgiving and therefore the cushioning will be less, whereas road shoes are made exactly for that and have plenty of cushioning, but less tread. I found that if I was on a long run across somewhere like Dartmoor and had to use a tarmac road or lane for a period, my feet became incredibly sore and I felt everyone of the studs in trail shoes. Think about where you will be running and choose wisely.

Pricewise I have never paid more that £70 for a pair of Nike Air Pegasus. Always last year's colours as my days of making fashion statements have long passed!

Alan
 

Mattys

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Trail shoes take into account that the ground you are running on will be forgiving and therefore the cushioning will be less, whereas road shoes are made exactly for that and have plenty of cushioning, but less tread. I found that if I was on a long run across somewhere like Dartmoor and had to use a tarmac road or lane for a period, my feet became incredibly sore and I felt everyone of the studs in trail shoes. Think about where you will be running and choose wisely.

Pricewise I have never paid more that £70 for a pair of Nike Air Pegasus. Always last year's colours as my days of making fashion statements have long passed!

Alan
That’s makes sense didn’t think of it like that guess that’s probably why mine don’t feel to comfortable (spongy) as there trail trainers and on a hard service!
I can see why all the trainers I’m looking at now all have this sponge base to them so makes sense!

I just came across these and have no words to explain the look of these what a state! *text deleted*
https://www.runnersneed.com/p/nike-...o-shield-waterproof-L1114279.html?colour=4510
 

Chelonian

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I just came across these...
Yeah, I've seen similar in cycling shoes.
It's easy to get into a vortex of indecision about 'optimum' shoes for every possible, variable climate and underfoot situation. I'd suggest focusing on a well-fitting shoe; accepting that everything in life (including love) requires compromise and adaptability; and just belting out the miles. :)
 

Mattys

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Yeah, I've seen similar in cycling shoes.
It's easy to get into a vortex of indecision about 'optimum' shoes for every possible, variable climate and underfoot situation. I'd suggest focusing on a well-fitting shoe; accepting that everything in life (including love) requires compromise and adaptability; and just belting out the miles. :)
Yeah your right there I think the cost doesn’t really make that much difference think it’s just down to your own training and effort you put in urself.
I guess I was jut eyeing up the £180 pairs hoping that for that price they’d do the running for me when I needed a breather!
 
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