Trainers and you

Mackie

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I just got a book in written by two ex marines that helps you with your circuit training and the best ways to achieve an all over level of fitness.

Upon reading the introduction, it says I must NOT use running shoes when doing circuits. Unfortunately, they didn't explain why, and I was wondering if anyone knew if I would cause myself some harm by doing circuits in running trainers.

Thanks in advance.
 

Phoenix

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Ive no idea why they'd suggest that. Whats the book called I'd like to give that a once over. Im assuming amazon/waterstones etc would stock it?
 

Mackie

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It's actually pretty hard to get a hold of nowadays, no longer in print. This is it though:

http://www.books.co.uk/robin_eggar_...oyal_marines_circuit_training/9780091813291/#

As far as I can tell it's a bit of a holy grail of RM fitness books as it gives you pretty much all you need to achieve and maintain the level of fitness needed.

What they say, is this:

Do NOT wear running shoes during circuit training. Wear cross trainers, aerobic shoes with a low cut hell, tennis or squash shoes - anything that provides a bit of uppers support when you turn and jump.

My bad, found some more information late in the book:

When doing circuits do not wear running shoes. Modern running shoes are designed purely for running in a straight line - they have tremendous shock absorption properties but the uppers are very light and flimsy. When your foot turns suddenly, it finds no support which puts extra unexpected pressure on the lower leg. If your circuit training involves regular and heavy weight lifting activity, you should consider a shoe that gives extra ankle support - Robin uses Nike Air Trainer Max.

I'm not sure if this information will be useful to anyone, but reading this a little more it seems this kind of thing can come in very important for training your feet for the RM 30 miler.
 

Mackie

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By uppers does he mean the tongue and area around the laces of the shoe?

If so my running shoes are pretty supportive in this area, much more than any other trainer I've had before. I don't know if there are exceptions to this rule, but it could be possible.
 

Shiloh79

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Hi Mackie, Just wondering mate, have you actually recieved your copy off this book or is this what you've came across online??? Its extremely hard to get hold off, nice one if you have mate!
 

Phoenix

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Hi,

Thanks for the info, as for uppers im sure thats the area around the tongue and laces basically that part that covers the top of your feet, in mu opinion.
 

Mackie

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Yeah I got my copy this morning. I decided the pretty high cost would be worth it in the long run as it gives you all the best circuits to do and a great 8+ weeks program.

I don't mind typing up some of the information if anyone wants it, but the majority of the book is made up of picture demonstrations of the circuits to be using. Really good read so far, and when I'm done with it I'll probably sell it on for a reduced price on here if I get as far as RT.
 

Shiloh79

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Mate tell me you didnt pay £60/£70 for that book ???? :? :shock: the other book seller in that link you posted is only charging £11 ...
 

sjuggins

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The book is good, I had a copy I bought years ago but think the wife "lost" it when we moved house this year.

Shiloh - If you look at the link for Blackwells bookshop it is out of stock. Think you can only buy these second hand now?
 

Shiloh79

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*text deleted*... just noticed that dude - cheers :D
 

Lshort1988

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yeah thats right apparently its no longer being published so the only way to get your mits on it is to buy it second hand and pay silly money :( ah well id rather work off my own initiative and research than spend £70 on a book which was originally £10, i cant justify it!
 

Ninja_Stoker

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Just a word of advice with regard buying training books:

The authors of training books get them published to earn money, not to make you fit. Without doubt there are some excellent books out there, but your time is far better (and cheaper) spent physically training, rather than reading. Keep a fitness diary from day one, it pays dividends. (Post it on here- it saves everyone lots of money).

There are some excellent training routines on this site & free careers publications to use as guidance from your AFCO, but it's no good just reading about it or "Giving the subject thorough, objective research" (as one grossly overweight person explained in an angry PM to me :roll:), you need to do the exercise.
 

Mackie

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Don't worry, I didn't spend £70 on it, I didn't even spend half that.

There are circuits in there I hadn't though of before, and I often find it easier to be given a regime than work one out myself. I'll be following the routine they have in the book, and I don't doubt that it'll benefit me, plus I won't need to spend £4 a circuit session at my local gym anymore.

I know it's cheaper to make up a routine yourself, but I personally find it easier to stick to a routine when I have something to physically follow.
 
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