Training for my September PRMC.

Kevend

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Last year I applied and I didnt follow through, But this year once it hit Jan 1st 2012, I decided to fully commit to my training in time for my September exams for it.
I've been avging 4-5 days a week since, besides the 1 week i was ill with a viral infection and another week where I took a rest week (around the 9th consecutive week i had been in the gym)

My routine is pretty much based on this
http://www.bsnonline.net/training/scott_herman.html
Some additional notes are my height is 5'6'' and my weight is as of this morning 12stone2lbs. (last week I avged 12stone8lbs)
My pushups are not too bad, I can do 30 within 20secounds give or take with ease, and I could possibly push myself to 80 within a minute and a half (I'll test that this week the day before my arms workout) but sit ups and pull ups I dont feel confident with.
In Jan I couldnt do a single pull-up due to the 1stone weight I gained from quitting smoking but as of now I can pump out around 5 with a wide grip.

Any advice, suggestions or help is much appriciated, I was originally told to go for strength training *text deleted* until I feel stable enough to do what physical work I have to do to pass, then work on my cardio.

-Kev
 

GingerjoeRM

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Hello Kev and welcome to the site.

I personally would sack weight lifting off, until you're confident you're hitting max P/S/P's. You'll need to gauge where you're at. Find a route (mapmyrun.com, or a track) and time yourself doing a 1.5miler, in 12.30, and then a return 1.5miler, best effort. You can do this on a treadmill if it's easier, but it's harder for most.

Then, time yourself best effort for good form pressups, situps and pullups. All can be found on the RM facebook page if you have it, if not they should be lurking around on google, they've just released really good new videos. You may want to time yourself over longer runs too.

When you know these times, you will know what you need to improve on. You can then add weight lifting into to aid training.

And as for your last little bit, you can work cardio and bodyweight stuff together, and infact, do it together, search on this forum for the fintan circuit. Cardio is a very very big factor and you need to top of your game.

More advice; lose fat, you don't need it. I'm currently cutting, reading up on Nutrition will help you loads.

This website can help you forum, as can this; http://exrx.net/
 

Kevend

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I was told doing cardio after a weight lifting session will reduce gains but it improves your cardio endurance, so I thinking I'll start doing that in a few weeks
 

Red Bull

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Not really any benefits in weights. It's all about bodyweight circuits and cardio work.

Google - British Military Fitness.

If they do classes near you I HIGHLY recommend you give it a try. Its exactly what you need, I only wish I found it earlier.

Other than that. Smash out bodyweight circuits (as mentioned fintan circuit is brilliant), cycling, swimming and running.
 

Kevend

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Thanks for the quick reply guys, much appreciated.

I've just found out they do BMF in Birkenhead park so I'm *text deleted**text deleted** start going this saturday if I can.

As for the body weight exercises, my gyms pretty naff and they dont even have a barbell let alone any benchpressing equipment for anything like that or squats.
I'll round this week off *text deleted* in my naff gym and I'll have to go to one a few miles away, not lookin forward to the walk back though haha.
 

Kevend

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I think you're getting confused between bodyweight exercises (push ups etc) and lifting your body weight.
Well i've told told different things all the time and one of the common ones was to do bench pressing and squats, something I dont have the equipment to do. Thats all I meant.
 

Kevend

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So far I've been trying to start my cardio and I dont know why, but my calves are just making it impossible.
It's been 2-3 weeks and I physically cant run on the treadmill, they tighten up instantly almost. It's starting to worry me.

Anyone had this issue before?
 

Kevend

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I dont stretch na, but I build it up some walking and fast paced walking for around 5-15mins, is that not enough?
 

jable1066

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If you're getting pains and the 5-15 minute walks do little to lessen these pains then I'd say... No, it clearly isn't enough.

If I don't spend a decent 30 minutes doing vigorous warm ups, dynamic stretches, mobility work, foam rolling etc. before a run there will undoubtedly be some part of my body that doesn't feel 100%. I think the best run I've had, with regard to tightness etc. was at my PRMC and that is because the staff give you a rather strenuous warm up by most peoples standards.

Try really, really stretching it out before and after runs. Work on your lower limbs for 15-20 minutes... get your hips, hamstrings, quads and calves warmed up, loosened off and stretched. If you don't have time to warm up, you don't have time to train! Sometimes, yes, if time is tight, then a lighter warm up has to be done but this is training. In training you take measures to ensure you don't injure yourself and all that stuff.

If the problem has been going on for a while though you really should see someone ASAP. The quicker you get the problem addressed and seen to by a pro, the quicker they can recommend you a course of action that will get you back on the road to recovery and onto training.
 

rmrnod

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I find the best way to warm up is a mile jog at the beginning of the run, I tend to aim for a 815-830 first mile then up the pace for the rest (bear in mind I don't run less than 6 miles so this probably wouldn't work if you only do little runs)
 

Kevend

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Any advice on pre-run warm ups? I never really bothered warming up, well not a 30min warm up
 

jarhead

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Warming up is all in the name,

warming the body up and muscles for the exercise you about to do.

To be honest you can get away with a pretty simple warm-up if you doing for example 4 miles steady pace as you will warm yourself up as you move along the miles, BUT you need to do some dynamic stretching NOT STATIC.

also a good stretch afterwoods is a must(static)

For anything though which is pushing your body ie intervals ie 3 mile hard tempo or longer distances ie 10k then a good warmup is vital as your body wont be ready for the effort you looking to put into the run.

This means jogging for around 5-10mins, then dynamic stretching on all the major muscle groups.

best suggestion is google dynamic stretching or looking on "running times" website and their training area, as it VERY good information.
 

Luke2504

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I'm a fan of skipping for a decent warm up. Gets the blood pumping to everywhere around your body. I'd do 3 x 3 minutes with stretching in between sets, that or a slow jog to wherever I was to start my run and then a quick stretch off.

With respect, you seem to be 'misguided' and new to training methods so I'll right up a few basic things I think you'd need to know:

Bodyweight: Using your own bodyweight for exercises, no additional weights. This may include push ups, sit ups, squats, burpees...you name it. There is no need for a gym at all. When training for the Royal Marines, this is the most important thing to do (other than running). Performing these in circuits is ideal as that's what you'll expect in the RM and will improve overall fitness. Go on Royal Marines Training Tool and start off with theres. I'd also advise looking at the proper technique for push ups, pull ups and sit ups. They're probably different and more difficult to what your used to.

Bodybuilding: Probably what you're doing at the moment. It is most likely the worst thing you can do in preparation for the RM, that or sitting around doing nothing. The results may look good but you are putting on unneeded weight which will hinder your running and potentially bodyweight exercises. I'd say anything with 7 - 14 reps would be put into this category (breaks up more muscle fibres). Besides, there is a better and more efficient ways of getting strong, without putting on bulky useless muscle.

Strength training: Alot of people will tell you to stay away from weights when applying to join the RM, but personally I think they're good (if you use them right). I myself take 2 days out of the week to do this. Legs and back on one day; chest, arms and shoulders the other day. The reason why this is better than bodybuilding is because you will get strong without getting as bulky (you'll still put on muscle ofcourse) but you'll be mainly be focussing on strengthening your CNS (central nervous system). This allows you to recruit more muscle fibres, more efficiently. You might not think it but it gets you stronger than you would solely focusing on gaining muscle. You'd want to be focusing on 5 or less reps and doing compound movements (using more than one muscle) like deadlifts (legs and back), squats, benchpress, rows etc. This is because you are training your muscles to work together, therefore making it more practical to use in real life.

Cardio: Last but not least. This is what you want to be focusing on the most. If you haven't ran much before, get out and do about three 30 minute runs a week. After 2 or 3 weeks do a mock PJFT (look it up if you don't know what it is (which you should) so you know where you're at. Now your base fitness is up, I'd advise doing hill sprints and interval runs once a week. Hill sprints will build your leg power, running speed and recovery time (in your PRMC you'll be doing alot of sprinting :wondering:). You only really need to do 10 sprints at 50+ metres at maximal effort, easier said than done. Interval training will get you use to a faster speed than you're use to. It goes like this if you don't know: Run 500 - 800m as fast as possible, take an active rest for 2 - 3 minutes, repeat 5 - 8 times (along those lines). And try and add in a long distance run now and again, 6+ miles would do good.

Sorry for the essay pal, or telling you things you already know. Got carried away. :bud:
 
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