Training questions

Touchstone

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Just a few questions

Is there a families day in YO training?

Someone mentioned you can wear your families medals on parade/pass out, is this true? In mind are my grandfathers service medals from the Navy.

Is there any medical training or instruction during YO training? What type?

Are you acquainted with any other assault rifles than the SA80?

Physical aspects aside, someone mentioned that YO training is the equivalent of doing a first class degree? Is this true, how mentally taxing is it in this respect?

What is the longest march you will do other than the ones in the commando tests (load weight?)?

Are the commando tests the hardest part, or at least, is it easier after this? How progressive is the fizz after the commando tests?

I hope you can answer them, thanks.
 
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Sotiris

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I know you certainly get aquainted with weapons you'll encounter in the East. Ak47, RPG 7....that sort of stuff.
 

Mack15

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Are the commando tests the hardest part, or at least, is it easier after this? How progressive is the fizz after the commando tests?
I have heard that when you go for officer training you have to do the commandoi tests in a quicker time than the other ranks so for the 30 miler you have to do in 7 hours instead of 8 which the other ranks will do it in, dunno the other times for officers but the times arnt extremely lowered.
 
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Sotiris

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Yea all the YO requirements are harder..you also have to navigate your way on the 30 miler.

They have to be. A YO has to be more physically capable then the men he's leading so he can lead from the front.
 
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Just a few questions

Is there a families day in YO training?

Yes, just before your first long weekend in about week 10.

Someone mentioned you can wear your families medals on parade/pass out, is this true? In mind are my grandfathers service medals from the Navy.

No you cannot wear them. The only exception I can think of is a mate of mine who died in Afghan this year. His brother will wear his Afghan medal when he passes out this year.
Of course, if you have earned the medals yourself ie with the TA/RMR, you can wear them.

Is there any medical training or instruction during YO training? What type?
There is a bit, but it's very basic. A Troop Commander is not going to be giving first aid in a battle situation, he'll be controlling the Sections and fighting the Troop. The Troop Sgt will deal with the casualty.

Are you acquainted with any other assault rifles than the SA80?
Not assault rifles but all the infantry weapons ranging from Browning 9mm to GPMG. Look at the RM website for the different infantry weapons.

Physical aspects aside, someone mentioned that YO training is the equivalent of doing a first class degree? Is this true, how mentally taxing is it in this respect?
It's pretty tough but if you get into training, you should be bright enough to get through it. It's not about being book smart but practically intelligent. You need to be able to think when you are very tired and all hell is breaking loose.

What is the longest march you will do other than the ones in the commando tests (load weight?)?
I am not going to tell you...partly because I can't remember and also because they change the Commando Course for the YOs every year. It's a very well kept secret.

Are the commando tests the hardest part, or at least, is it easier after this? How progressive is the fizz after the commando tests?
It depends upon the individual. The 30 Miler is absolutely nails but I think that the exercise is more difficult than all of the tests put together. After the Commando tests you lead the phys sessions in the form of circuits. It's still tough but there is much less pressure.

I hope these answers were helpful. Let me know if you want me to develop these answers even further. I am tight lipped about the Commando Course because they change it every year and not knowing what's ahead of you is an important part of Commando Training. It develops mental strength.
RMRO

Ps. You do not get much instruction on the AK or the RPG as you won't be using them. You will know their capabilities but that's about it.
 

Touchstone

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Thanks, some good answers there. I would like a little more information on the academic side. How will you be tested? Will you have to sit any examinations/tests (non physical), with things such as tactics and doctrine? Would you say it has helped develop your mind?

I was under the impression the Officers did the same training routine as recruits, and once they had completed the commando tests they began the officer section of training. But looking at the officer training course it seems to be incorporated from the start. Is this the case?

I notice there are various exercises (for Officers). Will any of these exercises allow you test your leadership, as in take control of a unit on an exercise?

In the training programme it says there is a tour of Sandhurst. What was this like? Did you meet with any Officer Cadets? (Where they awed? :praise:).

What is the likeliness of being deployed to a combat zone after passing out, such as Afghanistan? Could I put a preference to be deployed to whichever unit is serving there? Will you immediately go on operations when you pass out or will you get any continuation training?
 
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Thanks, some good answers there. I would like a little more information on the academic side. How will you be tested? Will you have to sit any examinations/tests (non physical), with things such as tactics and doctrine? Would you say it has helped develop your mind?

I think training certainly helped develop my mind. I have increased my confidence to levels I never thought I had. You will get tested on your knowledge of military topics throughout the year ranging from Signals to Corps History. You will also be required to plan and research presentations on military related subjects and write various essays on military topics. You are told to keep a journal of your experiences but not that many keep it up.
I was under the impression the Officers did the same training routine as recruits, and once they had completed the commando tests they began the officer section of training. But looking at the officer training course it seems to be incorporated from the start. Is this the case?

Officer Training is completely seperate. They follow similar training syllabus's but the Batch tend to get through things at a faster pace.

I notice there are various exercises (for Officers). Will any of these exercises allow you test your leadership, as in take control of a unit on an exercise?

Of course they test your leadership. As it states, you need 'excellent leadership potential'. YO training is there to develop that potential. You will take Section and Troop Command appointments which you have to pass to get through the course.

In the training programme it says there is a tour of Sandhurst. What was this like? Did you meet with any Officer Cadets? (Where they awed? ).

I think we went there twice in training. The first time for a visit and the second time for a Rugby match (we drew) and a piss up. It was quite good fun but many people join the Army without knowing about the RM so some were impressed and others weren't bothered. There are plenty of good Army Officers out there, part of my current job is to speak to them before they join the Army and get them interested in the RM.

What is the likeliness of being deployed to a combat zone after passing out, such as Afghanistan? Could I put a preference to be deployed to whichever unit is serving there? Will you immediately go on operations when you pass out or will you get any continuation training?

It completely depends where the Units are. If they are in Afghanistan and you choose that specific unit then you will fly out straight after you pass out of training. You leave training ready in all respects to go on Operations. You should want to deploy as soon as possible and prove yourself on Ops. Of my batch that passed out on 7/12/06, 3/4 went and served in Afghanistan within a year.
 
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Sotiris

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Sir,

So how much control do you have when it comes to which unit you're deployed to?
 
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You can request a Unit and they will try and take those choices into consideration but ultimately you are placed where you are needed. The needs of the Corps always come first.
 
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I think so. The Corps will always try and give you a preferance draft but ultimately will send you where it needs you to go.
 

Touchstone

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I think training certainly helped develop my mind. I have increased my confidence to levels I never thought I had. You will get tested on your knowledge of military topics throughout the year ranging from Signals to Corps History. You will also be required to plan and research presentations on military related subjects and write various essays on military topics. You are told to keep a journal of your experiences but not that many keep it up.

Sounds good. That was one of the questions I was going to ask, in how much it builds up your confidence. To me that aspect is very important, I need as much as I can get! I guess that must be important if you are going to be commanding. What is the largest presentation you will give, to how many people? I read in the programme there is a 30 minute presentation given by YO's.

Officer Training is completely separate. They follow similar training syllabus's but the Batch tend to get through things at a faster pace.

So is the Officer training undertaken after the commando tests? Looking at it Recruits start them in month 8 while YO's start in month 11. Does the extra time allow you to build up your fitness (harder tests as well). Exactly how many weeks is it? I read somewhere YO training is 60 weeks, but somewhere else that it's 54 weeks.

Of course they test your leadership. As it states, you need 'excellent leadership potential'. YO training is there to develop that potential. You will take Section and Troop Command appointments which you have to pass to get through the course.

Obviously I knew they would test your leadership, I was really just looking for examples. How does the Section and Troop Command appointments work? Will you be in charge of passed out Marines or..?
 
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It is hard to say the number of people you will give a presentation to as that depends on your training team but it is probably in the region of 30. You should expect to give a lecture on a military subject to a Company (90-120) people within the first year of your Troop Command. Needless to say, you must be confident in speaking to large groups of people.

Officer training is undertaken throughout the course. Term One is broadly similar to the recruits but after that you will get taught the orders process. Then when you are in the field you will take turns to lead command appointments ranging from Section to Troop level. You will be leading your batchmates who will play the role of Marines in the Troop/Section. YO training is 60 weeks long, used to be 54.

It is hard to explain how it works unless you have been in a military training establishment. Believe me though, you are pushed to your limits throughout the exercises. Whilst on exercise, you will never know what is coming next so cannot prepare for it mentally. You just have to get through it. You will hear the phrase 'dislocation of expectation' a number of times in training. What it basically boils down to is being able to yomp a distance carrying all your kit because the helicopter you were waiting for, has not turned up. You cannot prepare for this, you just have to have the raw mental ability to crack on and that's what we are looking for.
 
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