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UKSF Reserve

Discussion in 'RMR Section and RMR Selection' started by GreenNugget, Oct 21, 2019.

  1. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Great gen, thanks @Chelonian

    The differing age requirements between SBS (R) and SAS (R) is interesting. The two units clearly have two very different roles.
    SBS (R) sit within the UKSF directorate which provides a joint special operations task force headquarters, and is commanded by the Director Special Forces.
    SAS (R) sit within the 1st Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance Brigade. 1 ISR bde has responsibility for all British Army ISR capabilities.

    It’s worth acknowledging that, statistically, there will be members of this forum who are capable of joining one of these units.
     
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  2. GreenNugget

    GreenNugget Guest

    Do SAS (R) still qualify for SF pay now they are out of the group?
     
  3. ThatCrazyCat

    ThatCrazyCat Member

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    @TheRubberDagger What's the situation regarding locations of the detachments, is Poole the only one? I'd imagine there can't be too many units dotted around the country.
     
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  4. Reserve

    Reserve Royal Marines Commando

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    See PM.
     
  5. GreenNugget

    GreenNugget Guest

    Pretty sure it’s just Poole.

    @Ninja_Stoker @TheRubberDagger may know
     
  6. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    A 'colourised' image of a famous black-and-white photograph dated 18 Jan 1943.
    L detachment SAS "somewhere in the desert".
    Image pinched from a FB group.

    In a 2019 civilian scenario who would want to engage in a 'parking rage' dispute with these blokes? :eek:

    SAS_L_Det.jpg
     
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  7. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Amazing photograph, the colour really does add a new dimension to that image. It is mad how a splash of colour can turn a photograph into an accurate representation of the actual snapshot in time.

    Saying that, as I’m sure you will attest to with some of your former airborne brethren who undoubtedly went 22, the Sqns of H maintained the “Silly hair brigade” vibe. :D
     
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  8. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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    Agreed. There was some debate about the accuracy of the image enhancement. It was suggested that after about three months (!) on patrol the blokes would have had a hint of sun tan. Someone else then drily observed that the patrol's exposure to sunlight would have been minimal as all their movements would have been made in the dead of night. :)
     
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  9. sharpe

    sharpe Veteran Contributor

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    Great photo, you really can’t help but be in awe! Tom Hardy is apparently lined up to play paddy mayne in a tv program about them
     
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  10. GreenNugget

    GreenNugget Guest

    UKSF has retained reserve units (SBS and Sigs)that are deemed relevant to their needs and have provided both historic and ongoing operational effect for the group in recent operations, 21 & 23 have not. If they can adapt to their new role and position I'm sure that they could have a future, I'd hazard a guess that they will loose some establishment in the next round of cuts though. If they can't make HERA/HTR fly (and it is a bit of a lashup) I'm not sure that just providing the reserve to a bunch of Regular Gunners has quite the same recruiting pull as UKSF.
    @Rover @TheRubberDagger
     
  11. GreenNugget

    GreenNugget Guest

    Let’s face it, RM’s & PARAs still provide the majority of successful SF candidates. So good recruiting will, eventually, feed into SF selection. But I think a good discussion to have on here, especially for the benefit of our regular serving lads is the career implications and professional incentive to apply for selection. Whilst we may think of them as uber-gods it’s still important to explain to young Commando’s why they should apply. Times have changed, it isn’t the era where UKSF is the only way to “see action”. A 21 year spotty faced GD mne who has been a tour in Afghan might and probably has fired more rounds in anger than an SF bloke in the 80s/90s. Those who want to join for prestige and ego aren’t the sort that would pass. When I attended a UKSF reg recruitment brief in 2012 they stated the ideal candidate is mid to late 20s with half a dozen years of good quality soldiering behind him. More often than not Cpls who have section commander experience. Do people still see this as a course worth doing in today’s changing MoD! With the changes to
    RM being planned there are now plenty of other opportunities for the adrenalin buzz of high intensity training and combat. Also SFSG have a very intense cycle of ops/trg to satisfy the keenest of keen. There’s definitely been a shift and it’s clear more and more UKSF tasks are being picked by other units. Do you really need to be fully trained and badged to do LRRP type stuff, or covert observation. A commando unit/airborne can very easily pick these up. 42 Cdo fast roped onto a tanker not long ago and police conduct HE breached entries & throw flashbangs during CT jobs now! Point being if you are a trained bod, sitting at the NCO point is it worth it? Worth the time, effort and personal investment when you can achieve the same type of roles outside the group with no drop/change in rank? I’m playing devils advocate here, I’m currently in the process of enlisting as an ex reg into the reserve forces. But thought it was worth a chat and get some nods involved. Do nods still see this as a viable career option or is it becoming old hat?
     
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  12. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    There is a pull for service without bullśhít I think.

    Unlike much of the armed forces- Ideas are judged based on their quality, not on who expresses them. Everyone’s ideas for how to improve a plan are given serious consideration and insights from any member can be used to rethink and redefine work practices.

    I suppose service in SF would offer a strong sense of purpose.
     
  13. Rover

    Rover Moderator

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    I would suggest that some consideration be given to the different roles.;)
     
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  14. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    I take the point he is making though @Rover.
    Taliban bullets are no different than IRA or Serb bullets. However SF skirmishes or not, we need to acknowledge that HERRICK was heaviest persistent combat the British Armed Forces had experienced since the Korea.
    After more than 12 years of bitter conflict and the loss of 448 British lives – not to mention the thousands who have suffered serious injury- we have been left with some very young and very experienced troops. I remember a 25 year old Sgt who had three very active operational tours under his belt.

    My callsign actually had a 18 year old rifleman attach to us. He passed out of training on a Friday. Started pre deployment two weeks later. Before he knew it, he’s out grizzing it with us. He turned 19 out there and he was suppressing enemy with an LMG on a near daily basis. I’m talking 1000s of link spent. An overt war fighting experience that couldn’t be matched by a late 90s blade/shaky. It’s more akin to the Oman days, in terms of the protracted exposure to daily contacts.

    I guess now, in today’s Corps the opportunities for ‘adventure’ are still there but the chance compared to 9-10 years ago of getting into a ‘two-way range’ are very, very limited at present. I think SF will always have a healthy talent pool of willing souls to dip into.
     
  15. Reserve

    Reserve Royal Marines Commando

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    Below is the updated and current criteria for service with SAS (R) only.

    21 & 23 SAS accepts male and female applicants, with no previous military service. Applicants must be at least 17 years and 9 months or no older than 42 years 364 days when commencing enlistment into the Army Reserves. They are required to complete basic military training courses Alpha (TSC(A) – 1 week) and Bravo (TSC(B) – 2 weeks) (Phase 1) and the Combat Infantry Course – 2 weeks (Phase 2) before attempting SAS Reserves Selection.

    Ex Regular SP must be no older than 50 years 364 days on weekend 1, the Selection Induction Weekend (SIW) of SAS(R) Selection. This is so they are able to offer a 3-year return of service if they successfully pass Selection.
    Applicants must be able to commit to intense and extended training demands and be willing to deploy overseas and commit to operations.

    The Selection Course runs twice a year. It is both physically and mentally demanding and comprises of three main components, Hills Preparation, Aptitude and the Standard Operating Procedures and Tactics Course (SOPTAC). These three phases are run back to back and place considerable demands on an applicant’s time. Training generally takes place every other weekend (20 weekends in total), with weekly attendance at drill nights for classroom-based training.

    Aptitude and SOPTAC assessment exercises are both two weeks in duration.

    This information is in the public domain.
     
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  16. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Some interesting age parameters now!
     
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  17. Reserve

    Reserve Royal Marines Commando

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    UKSF (R)


    Hills Prep Course

    Hills Prep Course is a progressively arduous course of drill nights and weekends over several months, requiring a candidate to demonstrate mental and physical robustness. It is designed to prepare applicants for the rigours of the Aptitude phase.

    Aptitude
    Aptitude consists of a series of progressive marches against the clock, which culminates with a testing endurance march over arduous terrain.

    Standard Operating Procedures and Tactics Course
    On passing Aptitude, applicants will undertake a further six months training, over drill nights and weekends. This is an intensive period of instruction and assessment on Special Forces tactics, techniques and procedures, military skills form a major part of the programme. This is progressive, with the emphasis on individuals assimilating new skills, while under physical and mental pressure. On successful completion of the two-week final assessment exercise, applicants will be badged.

    Progressive training
    Following the completion of UKSF(R) Selection course, soldiers will enter a 24-month period of probation which will require the completion of a basic parachute course, a communication course and a Survive, Escape, Resist and Evade (SERE) course. On completion of the probationary period, ORs will be eligible to be mobilised and deployed on operations. Training and skill development will be continuous throughout the career, reflecting the requirement to maintain a high level of proficiency in a diverse range of skills.

    Salary
    On successful completion of basic training the starting daily rate for an SAS/SBS (R) rank is over £110 per day plus all the usual Reserve service incentives. Which includes an annual tax-free bounty, paid leave and SF pension.

    SBS (R)

    Special Boat Service (Reserve) requires you to have previously served or are currently serving within the Armed Forces. SBS (R) does not accept Direct Civilian Entrants.
     
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  18. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Hi,

    Let’s keep the contribution to this thread civil and useful for all those who read it.

    If the post is not helpful or related to the topic of the thread, then it doesn’t belong here.

    Play the ball, not the man.

    Thanks.
     
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  19. Johnny_Anonie

    Johnny_Anonie Moderator

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    Moving on, the age parameters are very interesting. I know that as recently as this summer three blokes in their 40s successfully passed P Coy. Appreciate this is an entirely different kettle of fish though.
     
  20. Chelonian

    Chelonian Moderator

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