Upper shoulder pain from push ups.

PROIR114

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Hi all, just wondering if anyone would be able to help me out with this, basically been doing push-ups each day for the past three weeks as well as upper body workouts with weights twice a week in order to prepare for the v-pjft. However recently starting to get pain in my upper left shoulder after the first 10 or so push-ups which I cannot continue with or the pain gets more serious. I gave myself a weeks rest and tried again but the pain quickly came back. Would anyone have any advice on any good shoulder stretches or therapy? I understand that I must have either strained it with a dumbbell or incorrect form in the push up but any stretch I attempt doesn’t seem to hit the area. Any help appreciated.
 

Corona

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Hi all, just wondering if anyone would be able to help me out with this, basically been doing push-ups each day for the past three weeks as well as upper body workouts with weights twice a week in order to prepare for the v-pjft. However recently starting to get pain in my upper left shoulder after the first 10 or so push-ups which I cannot continue with or the pain gets more serious. I gave myself a weeks rest and tried again but the pain quickly came back. Would anyone have any advice on any good shoulder stretches or therapy? I understand that I must have either strained it with a dumbbell or incorrect form in the push up but any stretch I attempt doesn’t seem to hit the area. Any help appreciated.

I'm by no means a medical professional but are you sure a weeks rest was enough? I've always been told to do 2 weeks rest for shoulder pain before continuing. None the less, I would recommend seeing a physio so you can get precise, correct therapy tailored to you as some exercises may aggravate it instead of help it.

Stretch wise, maybe these could help?
https://i.pinimg.com/originals/b3/01/79/b301790e2f18466df53a349eaab87cb7.jpg - move your arms as if you were making a snow angel. I put the foam roller on a piano stall so that I can get a proper stretch, but making a tower of sorts of sofa cushions also works.

I've always found a stretch that helped is interlinking your fingers behind your back, face your palms down and then straighten your arms downwards. You can also interlink your fingers in front of you, palms facing down and then move your arms to above your head with arms straight if that makes sense, with this as the end product https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4IWxPGqX...PuoTseyXAHACKgB/s1600/Arms-Overhead-Bound.jpg

Is there any chance you could provide a bit more detail as to where the pain is as it might be the same as me. But for sure, I'd see a physio if you can and it continues, the mistake I made was leaving it too late.
 

PROIR114

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Cheers for the info, really appreciate it. As for the direct location of the pain it’s hard to describe, I still have full rotation and movement in the shoulder it’s just when I go to attempt push ups now the pain begins to progressively get worse by the 4-5 push-up. The pain seems to be just in front of the the middle of shoulder, up towards the end of my collarbone if that makes sense. Thanks again for the help.
 

Corona

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Cheers for the info, really appreciate it. As for the direct location of the pain it’s hard to describe, I still have full rotation and movement in the shoulder it’s just when I go to attempt push ups now the pain begins to progressively get worse by the 4-5 push-up. The pain seems to be just in front of the the middle of shoulder, up towards the end of my collarbone if that makes sense. Thanks again for the help.
It does sound a lot like what I struggle with. This was what the physio had to say about my problem:
" I think still the main issue is that you developed a tendinopathy of your rotator cuff tendons, and they can take a long time to settle, and rehab of the rotator cuff and muscles which provide good muscle control around the shoulder and shoulder girdle is essential. "
The advice at first was to stop push ups and let the pain settle (hence the 2-4weeks rest). One good exercise for helping alleviate the pain was to have your upper arm down by your side, have your forearm point out in front of you at a 90 degree angle and then push your hands outwards against an object, at about 5/10 effort. The diagram should hopefully make some sense as I don't feel I've explained very well. This exercise is just to help alleviate pain and won't contribute to strengthening the shoulder girdle.
1603887909630.png
With regards to strengthening the shoulder girdle she gave me 2 main physio exercises for that:
1) Control Gelno-Humeral +Rotation Abducted 90 degrees
Start Position: Lie face down with the forehead supported by a folded towel and the pelvis and upper position relaxed. The upper arm is positioned 90 degrees out to the side with the elbow bent andhand hanging towards the floor. Make sure the front of the shoulder does not hang forwards to touch the bed.

Monitor/Control: Be aware of the position of the front of the shoulder. It must not move forwards, up or down during the exercise.

Action: Keeping the front of the shoulder off the bed, slowly rotate the arm so that the hand rotates up towards the head. Only move as far as the front of the shoulder stays controlled. Return to start position. Do NOT let the shoulder move up, back or forwards or let the elbow move at all. Move slow and do not stretch.

Start with 8 reps X2 gradually increase to 15 reps x 2 making sure to only do the exercise every other day. When you can do 15 reps, start to do with a 0.5kg weight in your hand but be careful not to over do it.
Unfortunately couldn't find a diagram online but hopefully this should help:
1603888686183.png
2) Control Scapula + Rotation Abducted 90
Start position : Lie face down with the forehead supported by a folded towel and the pelvis and upper position relaxed. The upper arm is positioned 90 degrees out to the side with the elbow bent andhand hanging towards the floor. Bring the shoulder blade up 2 centimetres and back 1 centimetre and hold this position. Make sure front shoulder does not touch bed.

Monitor/Control: Be aware of the position of the front of the shoulder. It must not move forwards, up or down during the exercise.

Action: Keeping front of shoulder off bed, slowly rotate the arm so that the hand rotates back towards the pelvis. Only move as far as the shoulder blade and front of the shoulder stay controlled. Then return to start position. Do not let shoulder blade or elbow move at all. Slow and do not stretch. Reps as above.

Hopefully these exercises help. Another thing to keep in mind is to ensure you are doing exercises for all muscles that make up the shoulder so the front of your shoulder isnt taking all the strain, all the time as I found my upper back and rear delts to be very weak so the front of my shoulder was putting in massive overtime.

Again, best bet would be to see a physio incase its serious and to make sure you get exercises tailored to what you have to be safe.
 

physiomum

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Hi @PROIR114

Just check that when you are doing your press ups and indeed all your weight training that you are keeping your cervical spine (neck) in a good position. We often poke our chins forward when exerting ourselves and this can cause compression within the spine which can lead to referred pain, especially to the shoulder.

So, make sure you keep your chin tucked and neck in a straight line throughout the repetitions. Also check your upper trapezius muscles and shoulder blades when doing the exercises. Are they elevated or are they relaxed and in contact with the ribcage? ie switch on your lats and serratus anterior. This helps to stabilise the spine and scapula and maintain a good position for optimal execution of the exercise.

To determine the origin of your symptoms I recommend an assessment by a good musculoskeletal physio but, following the above advice is definitely worth a try in the meantime
 
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